Friday, April 14, 2006

Design 3a - Ed B article from Animation Blast

Amid Amidi was kind enough to let me put up an interview with me about Ed from his world renowned cartoon magazine Animation Blast. (the only animation magazine that's actually about animators!)

Clarke scanned these for you.
The Boo Boo drawings above are not actually by Ed. It's someone at Spumco trying to inbetween Boo Boo's front and side view. Did you ever notice that the views of him look totally different? Does anybody have a copy of the original Ed Boo Boo model that I can put up here?







Go order back issues of Animation Blast. They are loaded with great artwork and articles.
http://www.animationblast.com/inprint/backissues/

105 comments:

RoboTaeKwon-Z said...

John!!! so much knowledge!!! My head feels like it wants to bust open! Thanks so much for this wealth of information!

jorge garrido said...

I can't believe you had the huevos to call him up. That's like a audio clip of a young Bob Bergen calling Mel Blanc's house to get voice acting tips.

"Dick Bichenbach? You call that a Bing Crsoby impression?"

79 bucks if someone gets the reference.*


*Really**





**Not really.

Brett W. Thompson said...

I love this blog. Seriously. So educational.

Danne8a said...

Thanks for all the College level eduacation for free!
That is, IF college still taught all the important fundamentals of animation.

jorge garrido needed to vent and apologizes for off-topic said...

DARN i just found out my mom threw out all my archie comics! Boxes and boxes of them! There goes my SAmm Schwartz blog... I was gonna scan his stories and analayze them... It's a cryin' shame that if you google his name you don't get any good sites....

David Germain said...

"Dick Bichenbach? You call that a Bing Crsoby impression?"

79 bucks if someone gets the reference.*


You're referring to the fact that animator Dick Bickenbach was the voice of the Bing Crosby rooster in Swooner Crooner (by Frank Tashlin c. 1944), correct?

Gabriel said...

I never thought I'd find myself thinking about positive aspects of the Flintstones. Living and learning...

S.G.A said...

I would love to see a post on tools of the trade as far as inking.
I am sure lots of people would like more info on that!

Robert Hume said...

Wow...this is such an amazing site...animation history 101 with John K! Seriously, all this is more helpful than everything I learned at MY crappy old college college(animation history wise anyways). Do you teach all your emploies this stuff at Spumco, or do they come prepackaged with this knowledge?
If so please direct me to the art schools you prefer to hire from. Might be too late for me, but perhaps such direction will inspire other young animators on this blog to get it right the first time around. ;)

S.G.A said...

When I was a kid I loved Flintstones backrounds and all the hb backrounds , then I would read the Dell comics and couldn't understand why the backrounds weren't as good. And this was before we had a vcr, So I read those golden books and little elf books , cause the bkgnds were so great.
Anyway , I lost track, ever notice how weird the comic book characters were compared to how they acted on tv.
I was always real fussy, and if al fago drew it I wouldn't even read it.... Now as feeble minded grown up I love Al fago drawings.

S.G.A said...

For guys who like spumco artists.
I grew up hooked on crack-ed magazine.
back issues from the 1980's have tons of FUNNY Bil Wray comics, lots of funny ahnold swartzenagger drawings.
Bil also did alot of INCREDIBLE, two man comics in Cracked with Bob Fingerman. I used to copy bils celebritys and give them to my family members on christmas every year till I was 13.

demi said...

Wow, this blog is seriously like a dream come true! Master classes in animation by John K.?

Since I was a little kid, I always wanted to be an animator, but never had the talent. I guess this is as close as I'll ever come to it. One thing is certain, though: I will NEVER look at Droopy the same way, ever again. Cheers.

David Germain said...

Ren & Stimpy: Lost Episodes

According to this link, the lost episodes of Ren & Stimpy come out July 18. Or has that been revealed here already?

Anonymous said...

Why were the two Boo Boo drawings by a Spumco artist put in the article with no mention or credit? From the article it seems that all the drawings shown are Ed's. They're beside the part where you mention that the front and side views of BooBoo don't make conventional sense, so it seems that they're supposed to show that...right?
Ed's stuff is sure nice.

Jorge, I don't think it's so terrifying or crazy to have called him; he was a retired, obscure animation artist. If he'd been ex-CEO of Coca Cola or Mamie Eisnehower or Liberace, then it might be presumptuous...but I'm sure he enjoyed being sought out by fans and working cartoonists. What could be more flattering than to think you made a difference?

Mitch K said...

Wow! What a post! Ed's personality was unexpected!

It's really interesting reading how you met your idols... will there be more stories like that?

Thanks for the awesome education! You've got everything in that tickle trunk of yours!

Anonymous said...

John K.

Would you ever draw your version of the Rat Pack?

Jesse

Anonymous said...

Hey John K.

Correct me if I'm wrong but was "Mans Best Friend" based on a Bugs Bunny cartoon by Chuck Jones? Where Mel Blanc gave Bugs a mutch differant voice?

Jesse

val said...

Man, I used to like the old hanna-barbera cartoons as a kid, but always found them second rate to warner bros. stuff. Never realized how much actually went into them! Reading through this blog is a real treat, so much good stuff here. Cheers, John!

Pedro Vargas said...

Wow, John. your posts keep getting better and better! I haven't known about his design abilities until I read this post. I'm now inspired to research many cartoonists as much as I can.

Anonymous said...

i love that barney. *o*

Nico said...

John, do you own the new DVDs that are out, of Flintstones Season 1, Huckleberry and Yogi? if so, what do you think about the DVDs... are they pretty good and intact?

(i'm referring in opposition to the Looney Tunes DVDs, since apparently WB is going nuts with "color correcting" and "restoring" them)

Evan said...

That article helped me understand a lot better what you like about the design. One aspect I notice specifically is Fred's nose, that's a great shape. Thanks for posting this.

I also understand that basis you used for the Yogi cartoons you guys did now, and I appreciate them so much more.

Evan said...

PS- I wanted to mention I noticed you finally gave Ed some credit on your Yogi cartoons, I noticed he's credited for layout (well and its dedicated to him).

Jitterbug said...

I grew up watching horrible Flintstones cartoons, the hated them, I never could understand why it lasted so long.

If they looked as good as those drawing that you posted, I would had thought differently.

JohnK said...

>>PS- I wanted to mention I noticed you finally gave Ed some credit on your Yogi cartoons, I noticed he's credited for layout (well and its dedicated to him).

"Finally"?

When didn't I ever credit him? Or anyone else?

Ed drew most of the background layouts on both Ranger Smith cartoons.

After he saw the cartoons he gave me Hell for drawing everyone off model all the time, and I said "That was the point".

Then he threatened to sock me.

Anonymous said...

"When didn't I ever credit him? Or anyone else?"

Evan meant the exact opposite. You have actually given him credit for his work, in contrast to his time at H-B.

Anonymous said...

After he saw the cartoons he gave me Hell for drawing everyone off model all the time, and I said "That was the point".

Then he threatened to sock me.


lol is that true?

I can't tell when your joking anymore, you seem to know so many of these ubber-macho conservative types it almost sounds plausible!

Robert Hume said...

BTW Have you ever gotten a chance to meet Chuck Jones as well? He was with us till only a few years ago, and I know he was often open to being interviewed. You said in a past post that we will never know the reasons why Chuck would remake some of his better cartoon ideas over and over again. This implied to me that you never got that chance to interview the famous animator/director. Am I wrong?

Anonymous said...

The last two posts have been immensely useful. I feel sorry for any artist who missed them. Thanks for putting them up and thanks to Amid for publishing the article.

-Eddie Fitzgerald

JohnK said...

>>BTW Have you ever gotten a chance to meet Chuck Jones as well? He was with us till only a few years ago, and I know he was often open to being interviewed.<<

Yeah, I met him a few times.He was very hard to talk to. He couldn't carry on a conversatiobn. If you asked him a specific question, he would would avoid answering it and instead quote Mark Twain or Dorothy Parker.

Clampett, Freleng, Hanna and Barbera, on the other hand were all clear as a bell and completely candid when talking about their cartoons (and other people's cartoons!)They were also generous in sharing their techniques with me. Clampett and Hanna taught me to time to music. Joe taught me pitch techniques. Ed taught me design theories. Friz taught me to crab.

I have lots of interviews with the old guys on tape. Maybe some day I'll find someone to transcribe them, then put them up.

Robert Hume said...

That would be great!! I love hearing about how all the greats and there experiences makeing those amazing cartoons!

Anonymous said...

I'd love to hear or read those interviews!

While I liked them as a kid (not as much as I liked looney tunes) I never quite appreciated them... I can see now how complex and subtle those early designs really are. Wow.


-Jordan
www.timwarnermovie.com

val said...

Interviews with Chuck, Friz, and Bob? I don't know that anyone who even has a passing interest in cartoons could refuse something like that. Dang, you've really been able to talk to some amazing people, it would be really insightful to be able to read or listen to those interviews.

C. A. M. Thompson said...

I really want to hear these interviews too!

Danny said...

I'd transcribe them if you'd want me to. And I'd actually enjoy to do it.

Why not also make mp3's and post them somewhere online? Sometimes listening is better than reading...

greetings,
d.

Kevin said...

Is there going to be any commentary on the Ren and Stimpy Lost episodes DVDs? the commentary on the R+S season one and two were really informative and interesting.

Gabriel said...

Why not also make mp3's and post them somewhere online? Sometimes listening is better than reading...

That's a great idea, I bet a lot of people would love to those. And sure some cartoon fan would transcribe them for free, it's not that much work and its fairly straightforward. I'd do it myself if english was my first language.

Desiree said...

Thats a treasure of information! Thanks a bunch!

lol, I woulda loved to see that BooBoo inbetween.

It's funny all the old shows i grew up on (Popeye, Woody Woodpecker, Looney, Flintstones etc) i only realised a few years ago that they were made back in the days. I always thought they were new. Ignorance is bliss eh?

Ed is a Genius! His drawings are absolutely beautiful!

You always inspire me to try and become better!
Thanks for posting!

JohnK said...

>>Why not also make mp3's and post them somewhere online? Sometimes listening is better than reading...

If I even knew what an mp3 was...

Let alone how to take a cassette tape and turn it into one

jorge garrido said...

>>"Finally"?

When didn't I ever credit him? Or anyone else?

He was talking about the 60's.

>>Ed drew most of the background layouts on both Ranger Smith cartoons.

After he saw the cartoons he gave me Hell for drawing everyone off model all the time, and I said "That was the point".

Then he threatened to sock me.

HAHAHA!

>>>Clampett and Hanna taught me to time to music. Joe taught me pitch techniques. Ed taught me design theories. Friz taught me to crab.
That's mean! Friz should have taught you how to time to music. He was the best.

>>If I even knew what an mp3 was...

Let alone how to take a cassette tape and turn it into one

You old people and your pants up to your ears...

JohnK said...

>>Friz should have taught you how to time to music. He was the best.

Well no, he wasn't. He was the most pedestrian. Everyone was better at music and timing than Friz.

rex said...

Hey John, thanks for posting all this amazing Ed Benedict stuff!!
I really enjoy reading all your theories and tips on design.

Evan said...

>>"Finally"?

When didn't I ever credit him? Or anyone else?


Oh, John, you took that "finally" the wrong way, I was referencing the article where you said the Flintstones never credited Ed with the designs, so you couldn't find out who he was. Sorry about that. I know first hand you always give credit where credit is due.

Danne8a said...

Sorry to get off topic here but I just want to say that I HATE Friz Frelengs cartoons.
I still to this day have No idea whatsoever as to why
Friz Freleng is so revered when it comes to the Synchronization of the music to his Cartoons.
The other Warner Bros. directors used music to a much better degree than Friz.
His cartoons were definately pedestrian but he always seemed to Emulate his style to whatever the house style was( I.e. whatever the other directors were molding the house style into at that time...)
And don't even get me started on how much wilder Warren Foster was as a writer with Clampett than Freleng.
All form and NO substance...THAT is Friz Freleng.

Anonymous said...

John K.

How mutch money did you half to pay to have Raymond Scott music in the Second season of Ren & Stimpy? I love that kind of old music. Especialy for cartoons.

Jesse

P.C. Unfunny said...

"He couldn't carry on a conversatiobn. If you asked him a specific question, he would would avoid answering it and instead quote Mark Twain or Dorothy Parker."

Iam not really surprised.Chuck didn't know how to make a funny cartoon if his life depended on it in his later years.

akira said...

mp3's are compressed audio files that are small enough to be easily and quickly transferred over the internet.. in the same way you are sharing these awesome images with us, you could be sharing audio files of your interviews...

by putting a tape into a player that has an audio out and connecting that to your computer's audio in, there are a number of software programs that can turn the interviews into .mp3s... i'm sure steve worth could help you with this, as he seems to be very involved in digital preservation of animation history...

or were you just joking about not knowing what an mp3 is?

akira said...

here you can find some great mp3s of interviews about animation...



i know the guy who runs this site would love to interview you on the site too, and i hope you do it! i'm sure he'd help you with converting tapes to mp3, too...

if you do want to post interviews in audio format on your site i'd definitely do anything to help you too.

akira said...

crap, sorry about that.. the html tag seemed to be working in the preview

the link is to:

Anonymous said...

pshhh I'll make the mp3s for you.

You just play it in a cassette, instead of putting headphones in the headphone jack but like an audio cable (like the red and white cables that plug in a dvd player or whatever)

Plug the other end into your computer's sound card input... then use a program (cubase? protools? garageband?) and press RECORD.

Then edit it with the program into mp3s. SOOO EASY!! I do it all the time with my music.


-Jordan
www.timwarnermovie.com

jorge garrido said...

>>>
Well no, he wasn't. He was the most pedestrian. Everyone was better at music and timing than Friz.

And who are you exactly? OH SNAP.
JohnK < ME

John, do you like Ed's designs for the Tex Avery cartoon Field and Scream? AT lest I think they're Ed's. They look so modern in 1955. He looks like "That Guy" crossed with George Jetson

Oh yeah, and it was a reference to Swooner Crooner. I'm a nerd. Dvid wins $10.

JohnK said...

>>
John, do you like Ed's designs for the Tex Avery cartoon Field and Scream? AT lest I think they're Ed's. They look so modern in 1955. He looks like "That Guy" crossed with George Jetson

Yeah I do. That character actually looks like Ed.

I talked to Ed last night on the phone. He's almost 94. Everyone say hi to him here.

He's gonna look at this today.

Robert Hume said...

Hey Ed, Just an Amazing body of work you've produced!! I really enjoyed hearing John's Break down of your history and credit to makeing all of those wounderful characters!!

Anonymous said...

Love your work Ed! Many thanks to John for enlightening us about your contributions to our favorite artform. You are one of the GREATS!Sincere best wishes to you and your loved ones.
John, I inadvertantly posted on the last thread that I would be happy to transcribe an interview or two:
cjboyle@comcast.net
Regards, Chris

Mish said...

John dude, no offense but your blog is a huge influence to a lot of kids trying to get out there. What you're doing is being really conservative. You're not really showing a variety of stuff, just your own influences that influenced you to finally come out with what you're doing right now. Dude, as much as I love your animation and as much as I think that "Ren seeks help" is one of the best animated things i've ever seen, something smells a little fishy to my little animator brain.

jorge garrido said...

Hi, Ed! You're one of my favourite cartoonists of all time! Your designs for those Hanna-Barbera cartoons were shaping my artistic nut when was but a wee child of 3 in Guatemala, and I had a Jetsons birthday party with pinatas of your characters! Thakns for everything, Ed!

Do you know who Craig Kellman is? He did designs on Flintstones on The Rocks.

Anonymous said...

I don't agree, Mish.
John has a superb critical eye, and if John thinks it's good and wortwhile to the budding artist/animator, I'm happy to go along for the ride. Many of the artists he's cited I've known about for years and wholheartedly agree with his reccomendations, others, like Don Martin I've had a second look at with renewed appreciation. And still others, Like Ed Benedict, I would never have known about were it not for this blog.
But anyway, you can't really expect John to write about any influences other than his own, can you?
Regards, Chris

JohnK said...

>>You're not really showing a variety of stuff,

Uh..what a strange comment. I don't know what you are looking at but there's a HUGE variety of stuff here and much more to come. I can only do about a post a day...

I'm not gonna show you crappy independant animation or anything like that, just cartoony stuff from mainly the 20s to the 50s.

That's a hell of a lot of ground to cover!

Anonymous said...

"You're not really showing a variety of stuff"


Man kids on here just make some of the stupidest and rudest of comments...but what ever.

I really appreciate the Variety of art your showing us here John, it's extremely refreshing!!

-Bob

JohnK said...

Just a reminder to say hi to Ed, who will be reading all your post today. Send him your love gift.

I've been trying to put up a new post with some of Ed's commercial designs today, but can't seem to get Blogger to work. Anyone else having problems?

Anonymous said...

Hi Ed! WOUNDERFUL work!! I really love your designs!! They've been a HUGE influence on me as an animtor and an artist growing up!! I'd love to see more of your charicter boards and layout designs in the future!! :D
Paul

Lee-Roy said...

Hey John, this is a great post. I appreciate the look into your own unique view of animation. You're lucky to have established a relationship with one of your major influences the way you did. I hope I can be so lucky. Keep up the good work, but don't let it kill ya.

Hi to Ed! Great designs! They are etched into our psyches! You are definitely smarter than the average bear.

Lee-Roy

R said...

Great work, Ed. So smooth!

If you give us some tips, tricks and techniques on the fundamentals of good design, they'll spread around soon enough and the animation world will look MUCH better.

Lots of eyes are watching.

Anonymous said...

Mr. Benedict,

You've got a huge following! Your work in cartoons was a springboard for so many people over the last fifty years. In fact, you are one of the most ripped-off men in cartoons today (but look at how few actually get "it" right like you did). Everybody ought to write you a royalty check right now.

We'd like to know your classical influences (i.e. non-cartooning inspirations) and also to look at your classical work.

Thanks for over fifty years of joy, Ed!

Best,
Brian O.

Kevin said...

John, I think somebody else asked this earlier: have you had a chance to check out the Season 1 Flinstones DVD, and if so what do you think of the remastering? have the cartoons lost any of their magic due to modern technology?

Thad K said...

Ed,

Thanks for creating some of the greatest designs in animation history. I had no idea you were still alive, and am glad that you have lived to see someone who passionately enjoys your work make sure you get credit for it.

-Thad Komorowski

Anonymous said...

Friz taught me to crab.

At least he taught you what you do best.

val said...

"What you're doing is being really conservative. You're not really showing a variety of stuff"

I think, if you're not conservative and show favoritism, you're only lying to others and yourself. I came here to look at John's stuff, and the kind of stuff that he's influenced by. Not that there isn't a big variety here, because there is! I've seen lots of amazing stuff on here.

val said...

Ed, you've been such a huge influence to the animation industry. Just like "anonymous" above said, everyone's trying to rip off you right now, except they don't even come close! It may have taken John's blog here to make me realize the genius behind your designs, but I sure as hell enjoyed them when I was a kid, and still do whenever I can catch them on TV. Cheers!

Ohjeepers said...

Mr. Ed Benedict!
I would indeed like to send you thanks sir, for all of the inspiration that you have provided me with over the years. Cellbound is one of my favorite cartoons ever, and when I was growing up it had a huge impact on me.

I think that the first time that I ever read about your work by name was when I was about Nineteen years old, and there was an Article that had this great early rough of Huckleberry Hound in it. In this drawing Huck looked more like a bumpkin, AND his face was made up of the most appealing curves EVER.

I still have this drawing in a clip book of mine, and I look at it all the time for inspiration. It is a perfect example of communicating clearly with a drawing.

Thanks again!

James.

Kevin W. Martinez said...

Er, um, Hi Ed!

I apologize for the belated salutation, because I haven't been reading John's blog for a ocuple of days. But you truly are one of the greatest designers in Animation history. We're all in your debt.

And now to respond to one of my heroes, John K:

"I'm not gonna show you crappy independant animation or anything like that"

Why exactly do consider crappy about Independant Animation?

"I've been trying to put up a new post with some of Ed's commercial designs today, but can't seem to get Blogger to work. Anyone else having problems? "

Were you trying to post Images? Because when i tried post images (Original Character art, nothing objectionable) on my blog, The Pediatrist's Playground, they don't show up on my blog psots for some reason

Sam said...

ED ROCKS!!

Anonymous said...

Yoo-hoo, Mr. Benedict!

You, sir, are a true genius. I know you take for granted what you did as basic professionalism, but that's because you did your job(albeit I know you know you not only did it well, but fantastically--at least, I hope you know that!), like many other guys. But what you've accomplished is special--above and beyond what many of your peers(and also many of yur bosses)did: you've influenced for all time the look of the animated art. Now, some of what we have today isn't up to the tremedous standards you set, but we're trying...we've got another 94 years to try. I've only worked in the cartoon business for about 1/5 of your life, but from the beginning I heard about you from artists I admired, cited as a huge influence. Thanks for being nice enough to befriend John K and chat with him, even if he was a pest(just kidding); it's meant a lot to him and now to all of us he shares your insights with. And finally--don't ever underestimate just how much life and charm YOU gave characters like Fred Flintstone; as a 3-4 year old girl I loved a middle-aged caveman--in a show meant for adults--because he was funny, and he looked friendly and funny and just appealing. That goes for everything you did. You can't ever be paid back for it all, but I wish we could. Thanks so much for having done it. It'll live a long, long, long time.
Love,
a girl cartoonist.

Mitch K said...

Hi Ed! Your work is beautiful!

P.C. Unfunny said...

Hey Ed,thank you for the laughs.

Josh "Just What the Doctor Ordered" Heisie said...

Mr. Benedict, you are truly a genius.

I love the fact that people's stubble is pretty much a seperate part of their face.

Thank you for designing some of animation's most beloved characters.

Clarke (Csnyde) said...

Ed,

As a child who was in love with all sorts of cartoons and artistically inclined, I was in love with your incredible contributions to the world of animation long before I even knew what it meant to be influenced by something. It wasn't until about 6 years ago that I was finally able to put a name and a face to that magical something which played such a major role in who I am today as an artist and who I strive to be every time I put pencil to paper. Now the name Ed Benedict is often times the first to spring from my tounge whenever I am asked about my art heroes and influences. I can't thank you enough for all that you have given to me and so many other artists by just "doing your job".

If I could ask you one question, it would be this.

"Who are your influences and art heroes"

If there was any justice for animation designers in this crap world, there would be a statue of you in front of the Cartoon Network building that even piegons wouldn't dare crap on.

I wish you all the best that life has to offer Ed. Thanks again.

David Germain said...

I'm not gonna show you crappy independant animation or anything like that, just cartoony stuff from mainly the 20s to the 50s.

That's a hell of a lot of ground to cover!


I'll second that.

Too many people don't realize that there is a tremendous variety as well as quality within those years. Not only that but many of the styles seen today (including anime) have been attempts to recapture or incorporate a piece of the great works from the '20's to the '50's.

The most common and coincidentally the most inane assessment of that time period is "it's nothing but slapstick." It's best to try to associate with those people as little as possible.

As for Ed Benedict. I already said he rules in a previous post, but there's no reason I can't say it again. Thank you, Ed, for all you've done. :)

Anonymous said...

Hey John,

Did Ed ever get any criticism for not following traditional designs and character construction (spheres, pears, sausages), or was it well received since the beginning of his career?


Max Ward

Matt Greenwood said...

Hi Ed,

Your work is amazing. You're a very influencial artist.

Anonymous said...

John K.

Did Ed Benedict do the drawings for Tex Avery's Dixieland Droopy?

Jesse

Mish said...

Didn't mean to offend you John, I mean dude, I'm influenced by Ed too.
All I'm saying is that you're insanely conservative.

Actually I got it a little wrong. Ed's stuff is a great example of design but I thought you were implying that it was great animation too. Hanna Barbera cartoons are actually very poorly animated, which is something you never mentioned.

And another thing - I like Ed's art, but it's not really that suitable for animation because the characters squeeze out two or three emotions for the most part. The first season of Flintstones had more than the rest of them, but expressions are just not very well covered in Flintstones. In that, the show always was sort of boring to the regular guy. It's refined taste, really, I like flintstones for their style, but how many people have you heard saying "Man, remember those awesome cartoons from when I was a kid? Flintstones? Man, that show was great!" Not really, cause it had the ingredients of a sitcom, not a cartoon.

Mish said...

Maybe I'm just bitter about the fact that you're badmouthing CalArts. Don't flame me too much man.

Mish said...

Or maybe it's because they made him water his style down.

JohnK said...

>>Hanna Barbera cartoons are actually very poorly animated, which is something you never mentioned.

Actually the early ones are very well animated. They're animated by some of the best animators from the Golden age. They're just limited, but very cleverly limited and with a lot of character.From 1958 - to about 1962.

I will post all about that period soon and back up my generalities.

BTW, I can't think of anything more conservative or lacking in invention or more inbred and ides than the Cal Arts style. I'll write about that soon too.

Wade said...

Hi John,this is off topic but I dont care, have you seen Eveready Harton In Buried Treasure?It was made in 1928 and shown at a dinner honouring Winsor Mc Cay creator of Gertie the dinosaur, apparently he was thoroughly digusted with it (tee hee).

Anonymous said...

How come Hanna Barbera went downhill later on with Scooby Doo and stuff like that?

Anonymous said...

There is no such thing as a "calarts style".
But talk about it anyway.

David Germain said...

Back to the topic. :P

John, this post of yours has given me an idea of a next sort of "drawing jam" we could all do. As a further tribute (or roast) to Ed Benedict, you could post a photograph of him, either one from him in his prime or from the present day, and we could all make funny caricatures of him. It would be great if we could try to do it in his style as well, but if some of us did it in our own style that would be great too.

Does that sound like a plan? Or is it just stupid?

TamalH said...

Hey John,

Found a link on Animation Blast with a few of Ed's works. Thought you might appreciate it if you haven't seen it already:

http://www.animationblast.com/issue8goodies/ed/

P.C. Unfunny said...

"BTW, I can't think of anything more conservative or lacking in invention or more inbred and ides than the Cal Arts style. I'll write about that soon too."


I would love to hear how you would run "Craptoon Network". I think they used to make funny cartoons and used to be called "Cartoon Network",Iam not really sure.

Eebs said...

John--
If you really do need someone to transcribe your interviews, I have plenty of free time. I don't have cable TV.

Hi Ed!

Duck Dodgers said...

Hi John,

there are some new Clampett-related posts on my blog...if you want to watch them.....

christopher said...

Everyone should go to the Animation Blast website and order the Ed Benedict issue. The interview is informative and entertaining. Ed mentions Russell Patterson and Roy Nelson as a few of his artistic influences in the interview. If anyone doesn't know who that is then they should go subscribe to Cartoon Retro and help Shane get his Roy Nelson book out faster! Fantagraphics is publishing a Russell Patterson book in June so look for it at your local comic shop!

Thanks for the posts about Mr. Benedict John! I'm looking forward to more!

Ed, thanks for all of your amazing contributions to the legacy of animation! You're the greatest!

Danny said...

As said john, feel free to contact me for any transcriptions needed. I could also help you on getting your tapes to mp3's which then anybody could then listen to via his computer.

sincire apologies for my rambling in previous mails and many greetings,
d.

Eric C. said...

Hey John,

What do you think about Ed Edd N Eddy ?

I think it's pretty original and you should hang out with the shows creator sometime.

_Eric

akira said...

wow, ed, you're reading this? well i don't have anything insightful to say, just THANK YOU! THANK YOU VERY MUCH! i have the animation blast issue highlighting your work and i wish there was more.. any chance you'll put together a whole book with your design work and maybe some advice/lessons as well?

thanks!

Morly said...

Hey Ed! Thanks so much for the amazing work you've done over the years. I can truly say my life is markedly better for having been exposed to your great work!

greg oakes said...

HELLO ED!!! you snuck into my head as a child without me even realizing it and planted some crazy seeds! much thank you sir!

dear john...

i'm doing my best to suck up everything you've been posting here and i really appreciate it! i never got into the world of animation (career wise) except for a few mini flip books over the years, but learning about the artists behind the scenes from classic cartoons i grew up watching is awesome! i don't have time in the day with trying to keep my own career goin and raising a family to even research all this stuff. so once again, thanks for posting, for simply having a blog and sharing the knowledge and your experiences. great stories, fun images! i'm learning names now, and that makes me happy cuz i really didn't have a clue about others except for what seemed to be mainstream names like chuck and tex. live and learn and i'm not ashamed to say that i was naive or ignorant of certain aspects of the animation world. one day i'd love to see my cartoons move, but that involves me moving first by getting off my fat ass. lol...

take care,...

go

static said...

John, I haven't been to your blog in a while but I'm glad I stopped in to see the Ed stuff. I'm right there with you - sat in front of the TV with my drawing pads my whole childhood. I too used to recognize the artists change through the episodes too and when I tried pointing it out to "regular" people, they'd be like, oh your imagination.

Anyway, here's an interesting EB drawing trying to nail down Betty. The most interesting part of this drawing is the little doodle on the upper center!

http://www.cartoongallery.com/sql2.php?imageid=24930

I'm a huge fan of the Mel Crawford GB stuff also. I had the first Golden Book with Fred Jr. (still do) I drew on every page. I've looked for an original painting from that with no luck. Nothing beats Ed's original stuff. BTW, I read your interview with him in the magazine in your laserdisc set - pretty funny. Both of you, I'd have to say.

Speaking of Ed's original designs, have you seen or what do you think of Warner Bros. new Flintstones designs based on Ed's original models. If you haven't seen them, I'll post a page or two from the style guide. It's nice to see Ed's influence back in the designs but it's not quite the same.

Jake said...

You see this? The Flintstones for Winston Cigarettes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_O5pA1k0JBI

Pretty funny stuff!

Alex S said...

I made this uh little animation about the Ren and Stimpy merchendise I hope you like mr K http://www.deviantart.com/view/32157308/

Sea_creature said...

Holy shit! I just stumbled upon this blog and I can't believe it! Is it really YOU??? WOW! AWESOME! I am completely blown away. I'm sure you hear this constantly, but I am a HUGE fan of Ren & Stimpy. The funniest cartoon ever made. What an influence you've been. I'm also an artist and cartoons are my thing. Yes, another one... I couldn't stop drawing these guys back in the day!
I am so glad I found this, it's fascinating! Thank you for all the wonderful info. You are a genious!

***end of fan butt kissing***

Take care,

Julie

rodineisilveira said...

These Boo Boo drawings were made by Dick "Bick" Bickenbach.

TedM said...

Thanks for doing these posts on Ed Benedict. I have been a fan of Yogi Bear,Huckleberry Hound and Fred Flintstone for years and years. He's right up there with Chuck Jones and Tex Avery.Do you have anymore stories or articles about Ed Benedict?