Thursday, June 15, 2006

Bugs Bunny Evolution - Egg shaped head, Robert Givens design

This model sheet is drawn by Robert Givens and it shows the early, fairly generic egg-shaped headed Bugs Bunny. This rabbit was underplayed and definitely mischievious- real cocksure. This is long before he became Smug Bunny and didn't have to do anything to win in his 50s cartoons. In the 40s Bugs Bunny cartoons Bugs Bunny had to act and work to win not only over his opponents but to win over the audience as well. By the 50s, people had so come to love the character that the directors didn't have to have the rabbit do much in the cartoons anymore. He won by default.

I think the early Bugs cartoons are the best and showed his personality at its richest and most entertaining.


Elmer's Candid Camera by Chuck Jones is the first cartoon where Bugs really seems like Bugs. He doesn't quite have the voice yet, but he is basically underplayed. This is almost the exact same cartoon as Tex Avery's A Wild Hare, except that Elmer has a camera instead of a gun.





To see more images from Elmer's Candid Camera, go visit Marc Deckter's "Cool, Calm and Confident" post at the legendary DUCK WALK.


A Wild Hare - Tex Avery 1940


The same situation as Porky's Rabbit Hunt, but now Bugs is less manic than when he was first born.

He has an early version of the familiar voice, he says "What's Up Doc" for the first time but he still doesn't have his name.
There are many routines that became staples of his act. Tons of variations were done of them in later cartoons-to the point where Bob Clampett told me that Bugs became a formula, and he started to feel trapped.
Bugs fakes dying. This is a new kind of humor for cartoons. It's funny because it's so serious. It's animated by Bob McKimson. Clampett later lampooned all the situations from the classic Bugs Bunny shorts that he helped gag for Tex.
(for more images, GO HERE.)


Bugs is a fag. Is everybody mad now???

83 comments:

max ward said...

Furious. I don't want queers in my cartoonies.

Shawn said...

Damn homo bunny!!! I'm PISSED!!

No, I like the early Bugs cartoons the best too. He actually moved in those cartoons, and had energy, and was fun to watch. Now he just stands around with his eyes halfway shut and says the same lines over and over again.

The "kissing as an insult" gag was first used by Charlie Chaplin in The Floorwalker, 1916.

Duck Dodgers said...

You can use my pics from the early Bugs in "Patient Porky" if you want, John!

john a said...

Bugs Bunny is no fag!

But he definitely thinks Elmer is--and he just thinks it's hysterical when he fills him with "confused feelings".

David Germain said...

Clampett later lampooned all the situations from the classic Bugs Bunny shorts that he helped gag for Tex.

Um....... that's been proven false. Bob Clampett was segregated into another building at that time. He couldn't have helped gag for Tex or anybody. Although, Bob did do some work on All This and Rabbit Stew after Tex was fired.
Another point: One thing Tex Avery liked to do was look at a cartoon (from WB or any other studio) that he felt was lacking and then try to redo it but with (he hoped) tremendous improvement. I do believe he did this very thing to Elmer's Candid Camera with his improved version A Wild Hare.
Yet another point: Bugs has proved his heterosexuality in cartoons like Bugs Bunny Rides Again, Hare Splitter, Bewitched Bunny, and A Lad In His Lamp. There's no need for hasty labelling.

Other than that, very informative post.

john a said...

Absolutely right David! Don't forget "The Greyhounded Hare" where Bugs fights off a pack of racing dogs in order to save what he thinks is a cute female bunny.

Marc Deckter said...

Shawn said... The "kissing as an insult" gag was first used by Charlie Chaplin in The Floorwalker, 1916.

Hey, thanks for this information Shawn! I hope you don't mind, I quoted you on my "A Wild Hare" post.

This is why the internet community is great - we can learn from each other!

Kali Fontecchio said...

That's what was so great about him- he could wear a ballerina outfit, or kiss a guy, and no one got angry- well except Elmer!

Yay, that Shaen guy is right, about the chaplin thing- I think a lot of the gags come from vaudeville --> keaton, chaplin etc. --> looney tunes.

lulu said...

Both Bugs & Elmer look absolutely adorable in those pictures!

Anonymous said...

jesus christ for people who analyze humorous cartoons you guys sure have a stick up your ass and no idea of what a joke is.

daffy duck is a fag too.

john a said...

No No No--

At the very worst you could say Daffy has ISSUES, but deep down, he's all male. Not the most MASCULINE of males, but a male nontheless.

stainboy said...

Bugs Bunny aka "the Rabbit" at his finest. hyperactive. cwazy.

the character definitely got increasingly bland over time.

"All the world was gay
Swinging all the way
Things were growing brighter day by day
Nothing ever wrong
Life was just a song
Till that Loony Toony came along...OHHHHH...

I'm going cuckoo, woo woo!
Here comes the choo choo, woo woo!
I'm so gooney loony toony nuts in the head,
Please pass the ketchup, I think I'll go to bed! Hoo!

Am I a screwball, woo woo!
Show me the eightball, woo woo!
Once I knew a thing or two
But now I'm a fop-a-roo
Hinky dinky harley, woo woo!"

Spizzerinktum said...

>>jesus christ for people who analyze humorous cartoons you guys sure have a stick up your ass and no idea of what a joke is.<<

Um, I think you have that backwards, old chum. Try looking up the word "facetious" sometime.

Meanwhile, since we just happen to be studying Bugs today, I got my Looney Tunes Vol. 3 in yesterday's mail, and the DVD case art made me very upset. Not just because it's ugly, but because Bugs looks weird. Really weird.

WHERE ARE HIS TEETH?! He looks like Garfield!
I can't remember ever seeing Bugs without his choppers. Can anyone enlighten me?

RoboTaeKwon-Z said...

Hey John, what is the story on that cartoon where Elmer buys Bugs as a pet(I don't remember the title)? His voice is very underplayed and lacks the Bowery Boys accent. Do you know anything about the thinking behind this? It's actually a pretty good cartoon. He even says a line that reminds me of Mr Horse.
Elmer puts Bugs in his pen and asks him how he likes his new home. Bugs replies "Well sir, I don't like it. It stinks!".

The Butcher said...

ARRRRRG! FAAAAAGS! It's like Ogre from Revenge of the Nerds.

I wish you can go back in time and remake Onward and Upward, replace the blatant anal sex jokes with typical classic Ren and Stimpy humor so everyone would laugh through it thinking their beloved cat and dog still had their innocence after 10 years, then at the very end just throw in the most foul, over the top gay sex scene television would allow for absolutely no reason. Just to kill everyone's buzz. That would have been a funnier way to piss everyone off.

Or you can annonce you're doing another Ranger Smith cartoon, then just make a 10 minute episode of Boo Boo and the Ranger making out slowly and pasionately with lots of groping and whispering sweet nothings into eachother's ear. If people are that pissed that Ren and Stimpy turned out be lovers, imagine how they would feel about that.

I'm kidding though. You'd be ruined if you did any of that. Notorious, but ruined.

Taco Jack said...

Totally off-topic, but can anyone tell me the title of the cartoon in which a cat is constantly punished by a dog - with the dog selecting the punishment by spinning a wheel with various options on it. The key line I remember in the toon is the cat screaming 'NO! NOT HAPPY BIRTHDAY!'

Thanks in advance.

And I always thought the later Bugs model drew a bunch of inspiration from Clark Gable. Is that right or no?

Kevin Langley said...

I love the really early Bugs cartoons, especially A Wild Hare. The design may be a little generic but definelty appealing. Are you going to be posting about McKimson's classic design all the way through to his eventual ruin?

BTW, I put up some model sheets from some Clampett cartoons that you might enjoy. Though I'm sure you're very familiar with each one.

Anonymous said...

>>I wish you can go back in time and remake Onward and Upward...


hahahahahaha



I'd love to see a post where you get into the specifics on animating to music.

ToonBard said...

Hey, the wrong post to put this in but what can i do. I'm a latecomer to this drawing course and want some crits on my work.

http://toonbard.blogspot.com/2006/06/hi-all-welcome-to-my-little-blog.html

Thanks

Eric C. said...

Hey John,

Someone said this on one of the fourms that I'm on.

I heard that Bob Clampett fired someone he worked with just because he asked for a raise.

I
wish Clampett's ego wasn't as big as it was. He was a brilliant
animator and had a keen sense of humor, but he treated those who worked with
him very poorly. I just read "The Moose That Roared" which is a history
of Jay Ward studios , and Bill Scott,
head writer and voice of Bullwinkle, said how he asked Clampett for a
pay raise, and Clampett said they'd talk about it later. Then that
night, Clampett had his lawyer call up Scott to tell him he was fired. Now
that's just cold.

Is this true and if so, do agree of what he did or know why he would do such a thing?

I'm not trying to put Clampett down, he's one of the greatest cartoonists EVER!

_Eric

S.G.A said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

You guys do know that most of your questions won't be answered, right?

Gavin Freitas said...

I didnt like the old design of bugs during these times. The character was starting to form with Elmer and it developed into somehing fantastic later but the animation was great. Not until Clampett gave bugs a
better look. Hey John in your earlier post the "Falling Hare" cartoon, I think it's really the only Bugs Bunny cartoon where he gets his ass kicked through out the cartoon....

Eric C. said...

Hey John,

Can you make some Mp3s or music files of you singing a Beatles song with your gutiar?

I bet alot of us would like to hear that, RIGHT GUYS?

_Eric

Marc Deckter said...

Taco Jack said...can anyone tell me the title of the cartoon in which a cat is constantly punished by a dog - with the dog selecting the punishment by spinning a wheel with various options on it.

Hi Taco Jack, I think the cartoon you are describing might be Robert McKimson's EARLY TO BET (1951) - it's really funny!

Jorge Garrido said...

The early ones are the best, since his personality wasn't wel defined he could "break character" more. That is, he lost sometimes, but when Jones tried that in 1955 he was criticized for it. (But I always loved it when he lost) The combination of WWII and Tex Avery;s anti-Disney tendencies made the character what he was. In my opinion, the differences in Daffy and Bug's character are over hyped.

Guys, John was kidding about Bugs being a fag. Take a f***ing joke.

The Butcher said...

"You guys do know that most of your questions won't be answered, right?"

So?

C. A. M. Thompson said...

This scene always made me laugh because Bugs puts his elbow right up in there.

Jerry Beck said...

Taco Jack asked if anyone knew the title of the cartoon in which a cat is constantly punished by a dog - with the dog selecting the punishment by spinning a wheel with various options on it. The key line I remember in the toon is the cat screaming 'NO! NOT HAPPY BIRTHDAY!'

Mark, you were also correct about Robert McKimson's EARLY TO BET (1951).

But I think the specific cartoon Taco Jack had in mind was IT'S HUMMERTIME (1950) also by McKimson.

Taco Jack said...

Thanks Marc and Jerry - Now I've got a title to hunt with.

One of my favorite (if that's the right word) Bugs 'playing dead' moments is in "Hare Ribbin'" when Bugs causes the dog to get so depressed that the actually shoots himself - (there's a director's cut where Bugs does the shooting as well.) It was one of the most shocking, hilarious moments I ever experienced when watching a cartoon. Totally wrong, and totally right.

Here's one other lost toon title of mine to stump you with: What's the Tom & Jerry cartoon (1940's era?) where they fight a war in the basement (complete with Jerry flying around in an egg carton 'bombing' Tom)?

P.C. Unfunny said...

Nice post John but this did urk me a bit.


"By the 50s, people had so come to love the character that the directors didn't have to have the rabbit do much in the cartoons anymore."

To sya Bugs nothing in cartoons such as "Bully For Bugs" and The hunting season trilogy is nonsense,Bugs became smarter and always had some trick up his sleeve and his tricks were funny, if he truely did nothing in these shorts he would have been shot by Elmer Fudd.

Anonymous said...

I always thought that the best Bugs Bunny cartoons were done in the 1940's and directed by Tex Avery, Bob Clampett and Chuck Jones. The following is a list of my favorite Bugs Bunny cartoons.

1. Elmers Canned Camer (Jones)

2. The Wild Hare (Avery)

3. Elmers Pet Rabbit (Jones)

4. The Heckling Hare (Avery)

5. Tortoise Beats Hare (Avery)

6. All This And Rabbit Stew (Avery)

7. Tortoise Wins By A Hare (Clampett)

8. Falling Hare (Clampett)

9. Hare Ribbin (Clampett)

10. Bugs Bunny Bond Rally (Clampett)

"ALL TRUE CLASSICS!" "RIGHT JOHN?"

Jesse Oliver

P.C. Unfunny said...

"What's the Tom & Jerry cartoon (1940's era?) where they fight a war in the basement (complete with Jerry flying around in an egg carton 'bombing' Tom)?"


The Yankee Doodle Mouse (1943).

Taco Jack said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Taco Jack said...

Thanks much p.c. - and Jesse, that's a very good list.

Roberto González said...

I think The Big Snooze is one of the best Bugs Bunny's I have ever watched.

Also, John k. said in another topic that Chuck Jones' Barbary Coast Bunny was one of his faves...but that's not one of the oldies. I actually don't remember Barbary Coast Bunny to have especially amazing gags (though all Looney Tunes are ok for me). I mostly remember its great design.

One of my fave Bugs Bunny's by Jones is Eightball Bunny, I think the story and the gags are amazing in that one.

Falling Hare and Tortoise Wins By A Hare are pretty good too, but I'm not sure if I would go for such an statement as that one of Clampett being the one who understood Bugs better. I really like Bugs in the early Jones stuff, probably later he became "too cool" and less active and agressive (and active and agressive is funny).

However I think Clampett's version of Daffy Duck is the best one no doubt.

Anonymous said...

When John made that last sentance, I do honestly believe that he was really making fun of how people love to argue in replies.

It's been a joke he's made a few times now, and he's right. Why people get so out of hand on this blog is beyond me, and i'll bet it confuses him about as much as it confuses me.

Anonymous said...

Hi John

Bugs Bunny from "Elmers Canned Camera" and Tex Avery's Bugs Bunny look like the most fun to draw. I love Tex Avery's Bugs Bunny modle sheet. I'm gonna print that out and start drawing those cool poses. Do you have anything to put up from the cartoon "Elmers Pet Rabbit"? Thats another one of my favorite Bugs Bunny cartoons. Also I did not know that McKimson work for Chuck Jones too. If you watch the opening credits from "Elmers Pet Rabbit" you will find that it was written by (Tex Avery writer) Rich Hogan.

Jesse Oliver

Art F. said...

the egghead Bugs is the best. Bugs was the one who taught me that kissin' dudes pisses them off to no end. and that's funny!!!

Roberto González said...

Don't really belongs here but I've been rewatching some Friz Freleng early cartoons and they were great. I'm not a Freleng fan either, I'd rather take Jones, Avery or Clampett first (not cure about McKimson, I'm not really a fan of his later stuff), but anyway, Slick Hare, for example, is a wonderful cartoon. Also A Hare Grows In Manhattan. Or Bugs Bunny Rides Again. I'll repeat I also prefer the visuals in Jones or Clampett cartoons but the ones I mentioned above had great gags and stories and the drawings are not bad either. This is not a Bug's one, but Yankee Doodle Daffy is also pretty cool.

Anonymous said...

Disney cartoons>warner bros. cartoons

JohnK said...

>>Um....... that's been proven false. Bob Clampett was segregated into another building at that time. <<

How has that been "proven" false?
Tex Avery himself agreed that Clampett helped gag up many of those cartoons. Clampett even has it on taped interviews with Avery.

Per said...

Hey John great post. I was wondering if the "eyebrow wiggle" counts as genius subtle animation or not.

Also I was wondering what medium you used for the Wally man illustrations...If it's photoshop possible tutorial post?

JohnK said...

>>To sya Bugs nothing in cartoons such as "Bully For Bugs" and The hunting season trilogy is nonsense,Bugs became smarter and always had some trick up his sleeve <<

I agree that Buly For Bugs is a Great cartoon ande Bugs did some work to earn his victory, but in that trilogy he does nothing but hold up signs. The word play that he uses to defeat Daffy is too easy. Daffy's not a stupid character. He was defeated by the writer and director, not by Bugs.

People accept Bugs doing nothing in these cartoons because they ahve seen him earn his wins in earlier cartoons. He was even funny at one time. He's serious and smug by the 50s.

JohnK said...

>>Hey John great post. I was wondering if the "eyebrow wiggle" counts as genius subtle animation or not.<<

Not to me.

>>Also I was wondering what medium you used for the Wally man illustrations...If it's photoshop possible tutorial post? <<

Markers.

Anonymous said...

Hey John

Did Tex Avery directed his animators the same way Bob Clampett directed his animators?

Jesse Oliver

The Butcher said...

What is this...mar-kers you speak of? Is it an easy program to use?

JohnK said...

>>Did Tex Avery directed his animators the same way Bob Clampett directed his animators?<<

I didn't
t know Tex personally, although I met him once.

But I know Ed Benedict and I talked to other animators who worked for Tex. They said that he pretty much posed out the whole cartoon himself, and the animators would just draw their own style on top of Tex's expressions and poses. They also said that it was hard to keep the drawings as funny as Tex's originals.

It's really interesting to watch Tex' Lantz cartoons in the 50s. They look like Tex's actual drawings, not redrawn in another style by a designer. I love those cartoons.They are very pure.

Jesse Oliver said...

John K.

I never really saw any of Tex' Lantz cartoons before, but they sound cool. Heres a question for ya. Which is your favorite Screwball Squirrel modle and who designed which one?

Jesse Oliver

Jesse Oliver said...

I would love to see the original Tex Avery drawings of George & Junior.

Jesse

baby huey said...

Hey John, you should make a cartoon about two zombies, who while not terrorizing the living, bicker with each other. They should look distinctively different, and have almost opposite personalities, which should give them great chemistry with each other.

Thad K said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Thad K said...

Good post, John! Really informative!

Anonymous said...

How has that been "proven" false?
Tex Avery himself agreed that Clampett helped gag up many of those cartoons. Clampett even has it on taped interviews with Avery.


Suurrrrrre he did. "Here, Tex, have another bottle of scotch."

P.C. Unfunny said...

"The word play that he uses to defeat Daffy is too easy."

I guess the word play is a matter of personal preference, I thought it was pretty clever and very funny.

"Daffy's not a stupid character. He was defeated by the writer and director, not by Bugs."

I think Jones wanted to debut a new Daffy,a version that he would carry on in "Duck Dodgers in teh 24 1/2 Century" and "Duck Amuck".


"He's serious and smug by the 50s."

Are you serious ? How was he smug and serious in "Barbary-Coast Bunny" or "Bewitched Bunny" ? I can name several more examples.

J. J. Hunsecker said...

>>Um....... that's been proven false. Bob Clampett was segregated into another building at that time. <<

How has that been "proven" false?
Tex Avery himself agreed that Clampett helped gag up many of those cartoons. Clampett even has it on taped interviews with Avery.


Where can I find this taped interview?

sajdera said...

Is the mundane, tabloid-esque, behind-the-scenes political system of 1950's Warner Bros. studios more interesting to you guys than free advice on solid techniques and nuggets of animation wisdom from a famous professional?

David Germain said...

Saj, learning the history of WB toons or anything at all is not as easy as opening a book. You don't always get the absolute truth that way.
Many of the original members of Termite Terrace granted many interviews to historians like John Canemaker and Michael Barrier some just afew short years before their deaths while others lingered on for decades before passing on. Unfortunately, not all of them gave an accurate account of what happened at the studio. In fact, one particular guy gave a highly embellished telling of his accomplishments, so much so that he actually gave himself most of the credit for everything. Thus, the others were quite upset and a huge brouhaha (that still lives on to this day in many of their fans) ensued. It's because of incidents like this that we have to search and search in order to find the absolute truth or at least as close as we can get.
John K. might be a great source of knowledge, but he's only one source. Some of the information he got and is now passing on to others needs corroboration (actually, some of it DEFINITELY does). That is why we ask and pry so much here and elsewhere, so that we may get a better sense of the entire picture, and proper credits won't get lost within the sands of time.

RoboTaeKwon-Z said...

I'm with David. There is so much misinformation out there that is perpetuated by in the "official accounts". Personally, whenever I find out the real story, I gain valuable insight into just what made these cartoons special, and often come away with something I can apply to my own work.
Trust me, it's not at all "mundane" to us.

Anonymous said...

"Is the mundane, tabloid-esque, behind-the-scenes political system of 1950's Warner Bros. studios more interesting to you guys than free advice on solid techniques and nuggets of animation wisdom from a famous professional?"

Not "more" interesting, but yes, definitely very very interesting--and whether you agree or not, important.
History is made up a thousand--a million--tiny litle details like the ones we like hearing, and these cartoons don't exist and weren't made in a vaccuum. They're all pieces of history, entertainment of their time and in fact, very personal films, having been made by an incredibly small group of people(even if they were shown to millions). What you're seeing in a Bugs Bunny cartoon is ONE guy's imagination or sense of humor, or another guy's skills as an artist/animator.
The more we know everything about these guys, the kinds of people they were and how they went about making these things, the better.

Anonymous said...

Btw, it's usually John who brings up these "mundane" details himself.
I also haven't noticed anyone asking him to quit with the "free advice" either. This is a blog, with bloggers' comments; you're going to get what you get(esp. if you don't moderate). That's the nature of it--it's fun & freeform.

If it's not technical enough for you, tough beans. ; )

jorge garrido said...

>It's really interesting to watch Tex' Lantz cartoons in the 50s. They look like Tex's actual drawings, not redrawn in another style by a designer. I love those cartoons.They are very pure.

It's so sad that Walter was so happy that he FINALLY got Tex Avery and he treated him like a god (yet gave him a shit contract) and when Tex quit after 4 cartoons it broke his heart! Poor Walter and poor Tex!

JohnK said...

>> In fact, one particular guy gave a highly embellished telling of his accomplishments, so much so that he actually gave himself most of the credit for everything.

I assume you are talking about Chuck Jones, who didn't even mention his mentor, Bob Clampett in his two autobiographies.

Of all the old guys I talked to, the only one that didn't badmouth the others was Clampett.

Keep reading the interviews with the old guys that Steve puts up at the animation archive. You'l be amazed at what those guys say.

Everyone took credit for everything as they still do today.

God, read the Disney books-you'd think no one else ever made a cartoon worth a damn.

P.C. Unfunny said...

"Everyone took credit for everything as they still do today."

I think the only character that any one would DENY creating was Gabby Goat. LOL

David Germain said...

I assume you are talking about Chuck Jones, who didn't even mention his mentor, Bob Clampett in his two autobiographies.

Of all the old guys I talked to, the only one that didn't badmouth the others was Clampett.


Actually, I was referring to Bob Clampett as per his imfamous 1969 interview with Michael Barrier. Bob didn't bad mouth anyone so much as he took credit for much more than he did, like the creation of Yosemite Sam as just one example. The only famous characters Clampett truly created at Warner Bros. were Tweety and Beaky Buzzard. At best he contributed significantly to the four big ones [Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd, Bugs Bunny] but that's about where it ends. He merely used Sylvester for his cartoon Kitty Kornered.
Yes, I know that Jones countered immediately with "Clampett actually stole from me." which is too silly a staement to even dignify. Yeah, Chuck Jones could be a mean S.O.B. If you got on his "bad list" he made sure your life was miserable. He could hold grudges for decades on end. (And really, Clampett was more of a comrade to Jones rather than mentor. Jones moreso mentored under Tex Avery, Friz Freleng and Frank Tashlin as Clampett did).

Anonymous said...

I assume you are talking about Chuck Jones, who didn't even mention his mentor, Bob Clampett in his two autobiographies.

Thanks for the best laugh I've had all month.

sajdera said...

I never met these directors, much less personally interview them, so I have reservations about second-guessing John K.'s account with the tidbits I've read in the "controversy" sections at Wikipedia, you know?

All in all, this is the same damn thing that happens between Beatles fans that dwell on the sordid details of their inter-personal relationship. Reading about it didn't enhance my appreciation for the music other than becoming a die-hard McCartney "defender." Then you step back and realize what a waste of time it all is!

That's just how I see it, anyway.

David Germain said...

Tex Avery himself agreed that Clampett helped gag up many of those cartoons. Clampett even has it on taped interviews with Avery.

Hey, John, when were these taped interviews made? Were these made around the 1969 interview or sometime after or before even? (Hee hee! I had a Snagglepuss moment back there :D )

Anonymous said...

"Disney cartoons>warner bros. cartoons"

You typoed that mark in the wrong direction. I just thought I would point out that obvious mistake to you. Heh.

JohnK said...

>>The only famous characters Clampett truly created at Warner Bros. were Tweety and Beaky Buzzard. At best he contributed significantly to the four big ones [Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd, Bugs Bunny] but that's about where it ends. He merely used Sylvester for his cartoon Kitty Kornered.

David, why should you know this? Do you have any evidence or have you talked personaly to any of the artists from the period?

Seems to me you are just repeating historian's opinions. You must have some secret evidence to support your beliefs?

P.C. Unfunny said...

"Of all the old guys I talked to, the only one that didn't badmouth the others was Clampett."


From what I have reda you are right taht Calmpett really didn't abd mouth anyone, but just like alot of the "old guys",Clampett did steal credit from others. As a matter of fact, I think Chuck Jones was the only director who gave credit to the creation of Bugs Bunny to Tex Avery.

P.C. Unfunny said...

EDIT:


"Of all the old guys I talked to, the only one that didn't badmouth the others was Clampett."


From what I have read you are right that Clampett really didn't bad mouth anyone, but just like alot of the "old guys",Clampett did steal credit from others for creating major characters. As a matter of fact,I think Chuck Jones was the only director who gave credit to the creation of Bugs Bunny to Tex Avery.

JohnK said...

>>the "old guys",Clampett did steal credit from others. As a matter of fact, I think Chuck Jones was the only director who gave credit to the creation of Bugs Bunny to Tex Avery. <<

Even though he didn't create Bugs Bunny. Jones was jealous of Clampett and hated him because he was always a few steps ahead of him throughout his career.

David Germain said...

You must have some secret evidence to support your beliefs?

Yep. Y'see, in a private letter to a friend (Fred Mintz) hand-written by Tex on his own stationary and dated 12-2-75 he said this about Clampett and Clampett's outlandish claim. [And no, this letter had NOTHING to do with Chuck Jones in any way, shape or form].

"I am now in the process of trying to stop an IMPOSTER, BOB CLAMPETT from spreading the word that he is the father of Bugs Bunny!---When I made "A Wild Hare" he was busy in another building knocking out Porky Pigs!---I was recently tricked into some film clips with Larry Jackson for his "Bugs Bunny Superstar"---[indecipherable word] "I told how I created Bugs Bunny, Elmer Fudd (1940) and Daffy Duck ("Porky's Duck Hunt") 1937---When the picture came out here I then found out he collaborated with Bob Clampett---! He cut the picture in Clampett's studio! Of course most of my comments were cut---"

I'd like to hear tapes of a Tex Avery interview that contradicts that.

Jones was jealous of Clampett and hated him because he was always a few steps ahead of him throughout his career.

That was moreso because Jones felt that Clampett had tricked him out of the directors chair when Ub Iwerks couldn't handle working at WB and took off. Personally, I think Clampett got the job fair and square. In any case, Jones was upset by this and held a grudge against Clampett for decades for that very reason. Really, both Jones and Clampett were doing quite well in the late '40's and early '50's. Noone was any steps ahead or behind the other at that time.

P.C. Unfunny said...

Hey Dave nice find.Can you tell me a bit about Chuck Jones' enemy's list ? Why was Carl Stalling on it ?

Anonymous said...

Three cheers for David Germain.

BrandonPierce said...

I didn't know, Clampett "mentored" Chuck Jones. Interesting. NOT!

David Germain said...

I don't think Chuck considered Stalling an "enemy" really. He just said Carl was a "strange little man". That's not necessarily a put-down. He also called Mike Maltese an "irritant extraordinaire". He meant both terms affectionately though because he admired both their work very much.
But, then again, animation history (and therefore history in general) is full of mysteries that one must keep investigating in order to find the truth. So often, the search for an answer only leads to more questions. We must take everything we read or hear with a grain of salt and keep up the search.

P.C. Unfunny said...

"I don't think Chuck considered Stalling an "enemy" really."

I mentioned Carl Stalling because Micheal Gray claimed that he was on the list in his article about Bob Clampett,I did doubt the validity of his article.

another str8 guy for gay rights said...

Cool! Bugs is gay! Just like Northstar from Alpha Flight ;-)

lastangelman said...

Why is any of this sniping about who stole what from who and deserves credit for what relevant to today's post? We're learning about how characters evolve, not how to stoke the flames between Jones fans and Clampett fans and Avery fans .
Hey maybe THAT'S why they're called fans - always fanning the flames of desire, jealousy and other two bit squandered emotions(I know it's short for FANATICS, same difference, doncha' think?).

PL said...

Does anyone know the name of the cartoon character that delivers a potted plant to an auditorium? He is antagonized by a small bird, I think. He shuffles his feet and occasionally stops looks at the camera and does this "ah-ha-ha" laugh. I think it is a cat and is in another cartoon.

Mattieshoe said...

your description of the 50's bugs couldn't be more true.

In fact, the plot of "Looney Tunes" Back in action" was based upon the concept that Bugs could just stand there Chomping his carrot and the masses would love him.


in every recent incarnation of Bugs, he seems like he's stuck in his, pretty boring, 50's phase.

It seems the executives behind these shows just picked up upon the most general and well known of his traits (Jones's 50s cartoons ), put them into a lame, mushy model, and expected it to be just as successful.


The problem is, People nowadays don't know the old, fun bugs from the 40's that everyone grew to love. This (and maybe a late Jones cartoon or two) is their only impression on the character. they don't know why he's acting smug. it doesn't seem like he's earned his right to act that way.

This is probably why no one cared much about Looney tunes: Back in action or any other Looney tunes market tie-ins; They haven't seen the cartoons that gave The Franchise it's place in history because no one ever shows Looney Tunes or Merrie Melodies on TV anymore. they're too bust bringing shows like The Smurfs and Scooby Doo to a new generation.

He's not Marketed because he can't be marketed right. and he can't be marketed right because no one knows what made his famous in the first place.

(Of course, that's not taking the general Lack of Artistic skill in today's cartoon business.