Thursday, October 26, 2006

Color Theory - does cost equal quality?

One of these " 'toons" costs 50 dollars to make, the other hundreds of millions.

http://www.crayolastore.com/index.asp
Here's everything you need to color style a cartoon, no matter what the budget!

24 comments:

Art F. said...

very succinctly put John. and oh so true.

Kitty said...

I love my little ponies. <33 The colours are pretty.

Raff said...

Now how am I supposed to combine and blend colors with Crayola Markers? I suppose I can crosshatch...

P.S. Enough eyesore purples and greens already. How about discussing light sources and shadows and such?

Freckled Derelict said...

Yikes! Toy driven cartoons.
How did you ever survive that crap!

Fire Exit said...

freckled derelict:

They used to have a Mighty Max cartoon series based on the 'pocket sets' which were usually in the shape of a snake or something.

The cartoons tryed so desperately to be hip and live up to the coolness of the name Max.

the plummer said...

as good as monsters inc was, i was dissapointed when i saw art from pre production on the movie that the film didn't follow them more closely. big dramatic change. you could see the change of hands from real artists to morons.

i think all your posts about color have saved my thesis film. so a big thank you in advanced!

Jorge Garrido said...

Eww.

Anonymous said...

And that genius Bill Plympton makes whole features with color he pulls right out of his ass!

Laura said...

I absolutely love my little pony! The picture brought back so many memories of when I used to make my GI Joes ride them into battle!

-jabajaw- said...

Why dont these issues get adressed in th epipeline?Or do they just not care enough?

Jordan said...

Hey i used to like Mighty Max! It had some good stories and characters. Haven't seen it in quite some time though.



Jordan

Anonymous said...

I actually enjoyed the two "Toy Story" movies and completely loved "The Incredibles," but "Monsters Inc." never appealed to me. Neither did "Finding Nemo."

Didn't John Lasseter reinstate Disney's traditional animation unit after they decided the big bucks could only be made from CG flicks?

All of which seem to be about smart-ass animals encroached upon by the human world...

Mitch K said...

I'm a cartoon artist John, and I love these background paintings and designs. When I was a kid, I used to think stuff like this, and Chuck Jone's stylings were mistakes, or done badly. Of course,this was when I was REALLY young. In my later pre-teen years though, I started to realize the beauty of this stuff.

Thanks for sharing! Inspiring stuff -- I'll apply it!

Kali Fontecchio said...

That Monster Inc. poster reminds me of Lisa Frank cotton candy rainbow poop.

No, cost does not equal quality.

S.G.A said...

Hmmmm, "No sir ,I don't Like it!"

Shawn said...

Hurts my eyes.

Hurts my teeth too.

S.G.A said...

I wanted to comment again, Yeah it's just so ugly and in your face and demanding, and it's everywhere! Those yogi pics were just sdo nice to look at in the other post.

I don't want this garbage hammerin' my kid over the head everytime he turn s on the tv, opens a book or leaves the house.

Daniel Thomas MacInnes said...

I don't know how you'd use crayons on a computer-animated cartoon. You could try scribbling on your monitor, but I don't think that'll do any good.

CGI, of course, is a little bit trickier, because of all that high-end technology. You're paying a ton of money to create and perfect a new set of tools. At least, that's been the case for Pixar's early years. I don't know if you hit a ceiling or not, a certain point when you've invested in technology and software enough and just jump straight into the artwork.

Given the current glop of CGI pictures, I'd say that won't happen just yet. Too bad. It'd sure be nice to make an animation film without spending $100 or $150 million dollars.

The GagaMan(n) said...

That Monsters Inc poster is far too over saturated, although they didn't look THAT bad in the actual film. As for the Finding Nemo fish colours? Well, they were based directly on the real colours of the fish, which are rather bright a lot of the time to start with. There's a difference between the marketing art and the actual film, I think.

cemenTIMental said...

Urgh, people should go back to making black & white cartoons, since they clearly can't handle colour! :)

Seriously, there should be more black & white animation... especially CG, i really enjoy seeing it done in black and white for some reason.

Bill said...

"Yikes! Toy driven cartoons.
How did you ever survive that crap! "

...It's called a paycheck. (No matter how dirty it makes you feel inside.)

Anonymous said...

Silly, this is how you make a CGI animation with crayolons. First you melt them into the shape of DVD disc using a Playing Dough mold ($14.95). Then you play it in you home entertainment theater ($500,000). Sit back and relax as your very own home turns into a psychedelic disco of colors (acid tab $30).

Mega said...

too much sugar, i think i just turned diabetic

Anonymous said...

Daniel Thomas Macinnes: New York animation studios and independent animators worldwide have used crayons to color their films for years. There was the award-winning holiday special "The Year Santa Got Aids", for example. Money need not be a requirement to achieve true genius.