Thursday, March 08, 2007

Slow But Sure - Carlo Vinci

Wow, before the censorship code happened in the mid 1930s cartoons were full of erotica!

Terrytoons had some hilarious titles:
Busted Blossoms
In My Lady's Garden

and this baby...



"Slow But Sure" (1934), Terrytoons
This is some very early Carlo Vinci animation. Carlo is one of the most unique animation stylists in history. He moved things like no one else. His specialties were sexy girls and dance animation.


clip 1:



Carlo was way ahead of his time. His animation is much more advanced than his contemporaries. He was doing squash and stretch, overlapping action, follow through and animation techniques before they were officially invented at Disney's.

In these same cartoons, there are animators moving almost stick figure like characters, while Carlo's animation of the same characters is very much alive.

In "Slow But Sure", the hare races the tortoise, but stops midway for some action from a sexy bunny who eagerly complies.













clip 2:

That's some pretty detailed anatomy for a kiddie cartoon!

































I'm gonna have pizza with Carlo's granson John Vinci tomorrow, so I'll try to get some good stories about his talented Grandpa for you...




clip 3:

Carlo was a dancer himself and you can certainly tell from his animation that he knew how to shake booty.












CLICK HERE TO WATCH THESE THREE CLIPS ALL TOGETHER!

The scene after this sure looks suspicious, like they did something more thrilling than skating and dancing!

Terrytoons and a lot of lost cartoons are full of funanimation styles that have disappeared, but thanks to Jerry Beck and Mark Kausler and a few other folks, the cartoons are being rediscovered. I hope we can revive some of the techniques that have been lost to time. Wait'll you see some great Bill Tytla animation from Terrytoons. I like it even more than his Disney animation!

If you are interested in getting some of these long lost cartoons, write to world renowned animation archaeologist Jerry Beck at CartoonBrew.

Marc Duckwalk Deckter procured these great images and clips for you, so give him a big thank you!

32 comments:

Kali Fontecchio said...

I love this cartoon! Carlo is probably one of my favorite animators, because of his amazing appeal, among other things.

Thanks for the clips and pictures MAAARRRRRCCCCCCC!!!!!!

Cayen said...

I heard that some of the REALLY old Betty Boop cartoons had nudity. However as far as I know this is only a rumor.

There's an interesting channel on the internet that has a bunch of the really OLD cartoons. After reading your thoughts on the expansion of animation and seeing it in action. it's enrichening..

CaveMatt said...

Wow! Thanks John k!! When I asked you for more Vinci and more Terrytoons I wasn't sure when we'd see it but it was worth the wait. What year did these come out? The animation is really sophisticated compared to alot of the other black and white cartoons I've seen. Thanks again!

toonamir said...

I love how the oldest stuff is almost always the best. thanks to folks like Jerry, Steve and yourself, animators won't have to keep re-inventing the wheel.

Tim said...

Wow, maybe I'm underexposed to dancing in animation, but the last clip was INCREDIBLE! So alive!

Stephen Worth said...

Read more about Carlo Vinci at the ASIFA-Hollywood Animation Archive!

See ya
Steve

Mitch K said...

Whoa, that dance animation is fantastic! It makes me want to dance!

Speaking of old dirty cartoons, have you ever seen "Eveready Harton in Buried Treasure", John?

J. J. Hunsecker said...

Hi John,

You stated that Carlo Vinci was putting in stretch and squash in his animation before Disney. Do you have an example of this before 1934 (the release year of the Terrytoon cartoon in your example)? Not to call your judgement into question, but stretch and squash did show up in Disney's The Three Little Pigs and Mickey's Mechanical Man in 1933.

Jorge Garrido said...

Holy, I've usually ignored 30s cartoons, thinking them primitive, but this blows my mind!

Thanks!

BTW, Duck Dodgers has lots of Vinci and Tylta Terrytoons images on his blog!

Tom said...

I had never posted here because I didn't want to make an account. However, I just got a gmail address and I guess that lets me post here too.

I am an animator myself. I just started college, and even though my school doesn't have a program, animation and filmmaking is what I want to do with my life, and always has been. Anyway, I just really wanted to thank you for doing this blog. I can look back at my old work and see everything that is wrong with it now, and I've been trying hard to use the techniques that you describe in your posts. This truly is a great resource for all animators trying to get their work out there, and it is amazing that you are doing this all for free, and just to help us out!

Thank you!

JohnK said...

>>You stated that Carlo Vinci was putting in stretch and squash in his animation before Disney. Do you have an example of this before 1934 (the release year of the Terrytoon cartoon in your example)?<<

I have lots of examples. You can get them too and check for yourself.

Trevour said...

I have never seen this before - thanks for the clips John!! That's some great interaction going on between the Miss and Mr. Hares.

Marc Deckter said...

Well I'm always happy to procure risqué Vinci rabbits for everyone!


I like that scene in the long clip too - where the worm and the bug stroll along past the singing turtle. It seems like a small detail, but that's the kind of action I miss in modern cartoons. It's fun and it's funny and it helps magnify how slow the turtle is.

drgrafik said...

Hello, John great posting as always.
I just started my own post. I've gotten fed up and tired of having to redo artwork supplied from 'agencies' who make tons o' money for useless artwork, that I decided to start my own blog about print produciton and design. I was hoping you could put a link in. I'm sure some of your readers and students could find helpful. Many of the principals are parallel. You can view my posting at:
http://ramblingsofthediureticmind.blogspot.com/
Thanks
Ethan

Roberto González said...

Man, in the second frame she really look like a prostitute.

Pretty cool, I love Carlo Vinci's stuff. I've discovered him via internet, thanks to you and Duck Dodgers.

I would like to have these cartoons in dvd.

The GagaMan(n) said...

Before this I've never really any Terrytoons work from the 30's, but has caught my interest. t seems every studio in that era of B&W sound toons had their great talent, even the Van Buren stuff (as crudely drawn as it was). Just behind the 40s (for the peek of character animation) and 50s (for the inspirational design) as my favorite decade of animation over all.

Jeff Read said...

Wow, that bunny is almost enough to make a man go furry.

One of the signs of good animation imho, is the capability to make sexy female characters appealing in the same way that real-life sexy women are. The Japanese used to be pretty good at this...

Jennifer said...

So it's true what they say about rabbits - hey hey!

I'm not really surprised at the cartoon content. I was always under the impression that the original intended audience for earlier, non-Disney cartoons were adults.

Did this cartoon come out before or after the Hays code? I don't remember when the Hays code was passed.

RoboTaeKwon-Z said...

It took a second to get over the character design (the furries have ruined everything!) but once I did, I couldn't get over how solid that girl rabbit is! What I love is that every pose is rock solid, clear, unique, and well observed! The dance is my favorite.
Thanks John!

abwinegar said...

A great example on showing that experimentation in cartoon animation pays off. The techniques used to produce cartoon animation in late 1920's - mid 1930's must have had an experimental stage before being produced.

I would have liked to have been there when they were in the process of developing some of these techniques. If the animators had been allowed to experiment more, instead of studios closing the doors to cartoon animation in mid-1960's, in my opinion would have only progressed. The studios would have only benefited. With newer talented animators they would have learned the production process from wise seasoned animators and directors and used it to produce classic style cartoons. Now that some of the seasoned animators and directors are gone, we have only their cartoons to look at and try to understand why this works and why that doesn't. We are stuck in a position of letting the classics collect dust or use them to understand the process and progress.

I want to progress. Hanging close to animators that have been in the industry is a good thing. John has the knowledge to let us see what the vision of the past is trying to show us. We are the ones that need to study this information and try to go further by using it.

If we go the road most traveled then we will only produce cartoons like on t.v. now. We need to go the road that is not traveled enough, it is a long and hard road to travel, But, the rewards of traveling that road is far more rewarding.

mike f. said...

[The scene after this sure looks suspicious, like they did something more thrilling than skating and dancing!]

In the clip, you can read the sign outside the place they go into. It's "The Rabbit Hole Inn".

I kid you not.

[I'm gonna have pizza with Carlo's granson John Vinci tomorrow, so I'll try to get some good stories about his talented Grandpa for you]

Can I come? I'll bring the rabbit...

J. J. Hunsecker said...

>>I have lots of examples. You can get them too and check for yourself.

Yeah, but I'd rather not pay for them.

JohnK said...

well then you'll have to be at the mercy of the opinions of more knowledgeable people.

Kali Fontecchio said...

ps- Vinci is such a perverted genius!!!!! I love those poses.

Max Ward said...

Wow! Really good stuff! 1934..christ. On this blog you show us eager students all the good animation that has ever existed and shuffle out the bad animation. Do you think it is good that we have this advantage, or do you think we should also look at bad animation and learn from its mistakes? I notice myself not even bothering with Friz Freleng cartoons anymore.

Jim Smith said...

Thanks for the genius injection.You know I think you're pretty good don't I?

Charlie J. said...

I was just copying the sexy rabbit off a DVD yesterday, and thinking the same thing! weird.

Kate said...

You lucky lug nut! you get to have lunch with his grandson? is the pizza covered with nostalgia? Awesome! oh and in Slow but Sure, of course they did something more than dance at "the RABBIT HOLE IN(N)". silly slutty bunny, tricks are for grown-ups.

Raff said...

Hey John, on an off topic, do you think you'll check out this exhibit in Montreal?

ramapith said...

You can see prototypical squash and stretch as early as McCay's LITTLE NEMO and the early Fleischer Inkwell shorts, though there it tends to be done for its own sake ("they're cartoon characters, watch how they stretch") rather than as part of basic character animation.
The earliest examples I've seen of "conventional" squash and stretch are in the early Disney Oswalds; for example, the car in RIVAL ROMEOS.

Alex said...

Hot!

Roberto González said...

There is something here that reminds me of a certain element in some Spumco cartoons I'm not always too glad of. It's when the rabbitt throws the bunny girl, then he takes her in his arms, kisses her a little more and throw her again.

I have to admit it, I find it hilarious for some reason...

But on the other hand, I don't think this kind of attitude should be prominent in cartoons.

Someone told me that in one of the last episodes of Weekend Pussy Hunt, one I never watched, Dirty Dog kisses the kitty girl and then she falls in love with him.

I'm sorry but I think the girl would seem just a little too simple if she acts like that. I have already said I dislike "motivations" and "political correctness" but I do think girls should eventually have a more defined role these days, and some personality. I don't even find this kind of thing as funny as the scene in Slow But Sure...the boy didn't treat the bunny girl very well, but she was acting like a sexual object herself anyway.

I think you do a better job with Sody Pop character.