Monday, September 17, 2007

Cartoon College Year 1: My Ideal Cartoon School


This course is designed to make the graduates as skilled as possible.

On top of that, they would be trained to be extremely observant and analytic. They would be able to adapt to many drawing styles, because they would know the difference between what is a universal drawing principle and what is a superficial stylistic habit.

It doesn't matter if you plan to be a 2d animator, CG animator or even a Flash animator, these skills will put you at the top of your chosen branch of animation.

It's also designed to inspire the cartoonists to enjoy the immense potential of creativity that is possible when you combine skill, imagination and fun.




1st year

1) 1st Principles of Cartoon Drawing

Basic Construction

Traditional Animated Cartoon construction:

We will learn classic cartoon construction in the same order that classic cartoonists learned it, starting with rubber hose construction and working our way towards sphere and pear construction.
http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com/2007/02/rise-and-fall-of-construction-in.html

Toy Construction: Drawing cartoon shapes in actual 3 dimensions

Cartoon toys are cartoon shapes (non-anatomical) modeled into actual 3 dimensional objects. How better to learn how cartoony shapes look in different positions than to turn toys in different positions and draw them?http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com/2007/09/top-cat-turnaround-toy-construction_19.html

Classic cartoon construction is strictly theoretical. Drawing toys puts the theories to the test and will make you draw more dimensional than you ever thought possible.

Line Of Action
http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com/2006/05/animation-school-lesson-5-line-of.html

Silhouettes
These drawing tools are used for the purpose of clarity. They give the artist control of how the audience perceives their poses.

Drawing Funny

Near the end of the year, once the students have a good grasp of basic cartoon drawing tools, then we will apply them to the task of making people laugh by visuals alone.

I'll have to think about how to actually teach this. It may be more of a case of encouraging it and inspiring people by showing tons of examples from the funniest cartoonists in history.


2) Inbetweening and Cleanup

Historically, the most successful method for learning anything has been the apprenticeship system. In the early days of animation, cartoonists broke into the business by assisting more experienced animators. They cleaned up the animators' rough poses and drew the inbetweens. Being an assistant animator teaches you many important principles of animation. You just absorb what the animator is doing and then when you begin to animate yourself, you have a great head start. I think the first year students should inbetween and cleanup the 3rd and 4th year students' animation.

Cleanup itself is extremely important to good animation. Animation is about more than smooth motion. It is about clear distinct drawings, expressions and poses. Smooth motion of vague or sloppy drawings cannot compete with smooth motion of strong distinct entertaining drawings.

3) 1st Principles of Cartoon Motion

We would learn the basic tools of cartoon motion, step by step starting with rubber hose animation.

rubber hose animation basics

animating to beats,http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com/2007/08/animation-course-1-lesson-1-beat-kali.html

how to read and write ex sheets.
-walks, double bounce walks, runs, basic movement,
figure 8 motions,
Overlapping Action
basic lip synch,
¾ walks with animating backgrounds
Animating the impossible-using the medium to do what only animation can do.


4) Life Drawing

Studying the general from life

with an emphasis on slow careful drawings, structure, perspective and proportions.

In the first year, we would concentrate on:

Proportions
perspective
foreshortening


Not much detailed anatomy until 2nd year.

Life drawing has not brought many tangible benefits to young animators' cartoon skills. I have seen many student portfolios that have decent life drawings, yet primitive cartoon drawings. Life drawing should be geared to help the student apply general skills from observing life to his cartoon drawings. That would be the aim of this life drawing class. No quick gesture drawings. Scribbling is not a useful animators' tool.

5) Caricature and Observation

Observation over style: Learning to use your eyes and senses to analyze, rather than copying trendy or established styles.

When you sit down to caricature a person, you should try to bury all your preconceived notions of what "caricature style" is.

There is no caricature style. Each person is unique. Every person is a unique style and the person should dictate what you draw.

You should not filter the subject through what you think your style or your favorite caricaturist's style is.

The purpose of caricaturing in this course will be to break your prejudices.
You will be amassing many many new shapes and forms that you can later apply to your animation characters.

You will learn how to see contrasts and how to exaggerate them, thus drawing attention to what makes people and shapes have a distinct clear visual overall statement.

This will help kill any tendencies to genericism that the rest of the business instills in young artists.



6) Applications

This class will be totally devoted to making sure that the students apply what they learn from their other classes to actual cartoon drawings and animation. This is a big hole in most animation schools. We will plug up the hole here.

If you learned foreshortening in life drawing yesterday, you will then do a bunch of drawings of Donald Duck using foreshortening.

If you learned new eye shapes or head shapes in caricature class, you will draw simpler more cartoony characters that use those shapes.

7) ROOTS - History of cartoons

cartoons, comics and animation from 1920 or so till about 1965. (this would be every year and each year I would have the students study aspects of classic cartoons that relate to their exercises.

This course is meant to broaden the cartoonists' horizons and to inspire them.
Disney will merely be one of very many styles we will look at.

Electives

If I had my choice in electives, I would design courses that would broaden the interests of cartoonists but at the same time enhance their creativity and ideas.

Music,

Dance (every year)

Technical Crap Basic Flash

Great Entertainers from other fields

Gene Krupa
Jack Benny

Fred Astaire
Kirk Douglas
Joan Crawford
Peter Lorre
The Three Stooges
Buster Keaton
Elvis
Frank Sinatra
Ella Fitzgerald
Cab Calloway

many many more...



I'm curious as to how many people would take a course like this. If you are thinking of going to an animation/cartooning school in the next couple years, read this outline of my year one and tell me in the comments whether you would sign up for something like this. (I will add the other years in posts soon)

If I get enough interest, maybe I can take it to an art school.

I know one thing. If I started a school for cartoons and animation, the graduates would be in great demand throughout the industry.

Many cartoonists who have gone through the rigorous Spumco training have gone on to great success and fame.

This course would be even more focused on the students because there would be no show deadlines complicating the matter.

I bet if I get a hundred or 2 comments from wanna-be students, we'd have a good argument to sell this school to someone.




http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com/2007/09/year-2-cartoon-college.html

http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com/2007/11/cartoon-college-year-3.html

242 comments:

1 – 200 of 242   Newer›   Newest»
Art F. said...

SIGN ME UP! where do i send my tuition?!

queefy said...

I'd take all that except dance. My dad would beat the fuck out of me for being a fag.

/\/\ikeB said...

Yeah I'd invest in a syllabus like that, if/when I get the money to go to another art school.

Do you think this could apply to computer animators? There's not a lot of funny CG around....

JoJo B. said...

Of course I'd sign up for this!

Sean Worsham said...

I'd do it! Even though I already graduated college. I'd quit my current job and take my masters there. So long as you, Mike and Eddie are teaching there!

Ben Forbes said...

I'd do all of it. Sign me up now. Seriously. I think the dance thing is good for understanding movement too :P

One thing about your thought on the cleanup of 3rd and fourth year students animation... wouldn't they have to understand how to cleanup a sketch properly?

Now, what happened to this Blog Topic you posted in our anniversary post:
YOU BETTER GET SERIOUS ABOUT BEING FUNNY BECAUSE I'M STARTING A NEW STUDIO TO KICK EVERYONE'S ASS

Kali Fontecchio said...

I'm enrolled! Hardy, har, har, har!

davidvantuyle said...

Hey I'm David
I'm Currently attending an art school, called Kendall College in Michigan. I am majoring in Animation. I want to be able to do 3D and 2D (I love Both) I've had a strong love for it ever since I was little. I want to learn everything there is to know about it. I hope one day to become an Amazing animator. I would so sign up to take this course.

If anyone wants to get a hold of me and talk some animation please do...

i_say_geneva_u_hear_helsinki@hotmail.com

David VanTuyle

Gochris said...

I'm 47. I went to art school to learn film production. A waste of time, mainly due to lousy teaching. (But I did see all of Hithcocks films during that period - learned more watching them than going to school.)

I'd love to go to this school.

Mason Shelby said...

I currently go to James Madison University. I'd transfer to this dream school in a heartbeat. Vigorous and serious study of legit animation, rather than how-to courses on the best way to copy current fads and trends.

stiff said...

I have a B.S. in Bio-damn-chemistry and a cushy desk job--I would gladly quit said job and move to L.A. if this was available. I'll start saving now.

mdouglas said...

This is the program every serious aspiring cartoonist/animator should attend. This is an incredibly focused program you've outlined! Everything I wish I had taken at my $100,000 "Animation" School.

Bruce said...

I'll definitely get an application form for this, no question. If this idea catches on, then it’ll be the next best school to go to, right after Ralph's own school for cartoonists (however, are dirty Canadians, such as myself, allowed to join?)

I cannot wait for the advice you'll give to me, so thanks again, John.

Julián höek said...

I'm in!!!!!!
i guess i'll have to start saving money for my trip to the states!!!

Julian from Argentina

Aaron Paetz said...

I would sign up for SURE! Sounds like an amazing training!

sarah j. said...

I'm in, I'm in, I'm in. The online lessons are priceless, but to be in an actual classroom setting, learning alongside other devoted students of cartooning, under the tutelage of experienced, funny people...yes, prease!

I've always wanted to learn to dance, especially the awesome crazy dances from the 20s-50s (like in Fred Moore's "All the Cats Join In"), not that weird swaying crap kids do at prom today. Also the ukelele! When I think of fun, cartoony instruments, I think ukelele!

Ukelele.

Jake Thomas said...

Your ideal cartoon school, would be a cartoon santuary John. It would be the only school I would enroll to. Ever.

Emmett said...

Lord knows I am less than adequate with life drawing skills. Otherwise, if this can be offered in terms of a graduate school, I'd fill out the application right away. That is, considering, we don't have to take any liberal arts courses that have absolutely nothing to do with cartoon school.
You should definitally pursue this, Mr. K.

Ryan G. said...

Man! I wish there was a John K. U.

Brian B said...

Nice post. Couple questions

If you created enough interest in this, I'd be interested at what level you would be accepting students into the program. How do you choose who's going to be your incoming class? What skills do you look for prior to entering. At some point the classes too become too big. How intimate should the teacher-student environment be also?

Interesting note about the gesture drawing also. What year do you think should teach it, if any at all?

Pencilninja said...

I'd hit it.
er- sign up, I would sign up.

Matt Greenwood said...

Here in Australia I think I'm gonna have to waste years of my life learning Maya instead of actually learning animation.

That "technical crap" section you said would be the focus of any animation course you could find here, with drawing and animation principles would be secondary to learning how to use a computer program.

I'd totally take this course. Couldn't you an online course and charge people to take it?

Jake Mittleman said...

I would definatly go to this college, no doubt. It'd be the top of my list.

Angela said...

I´ve never imagine one day i would be able to read you almost every day. Ren & Stimpy was an inflection point in my life. After watching them, I´d no doubt that I would became an animator. And that´s what I am now!

I´m from Argentina. And I am also a teacher. So I will follow your schedules! HA! Seriously, I wish I would ever be able to go to your amazing school!

Dance and theatre would be great for those who feel embarrassed of acting what they have to animate! So let´s do it!

Dan! said...

If such a cartoon school were to come into existence, I'd join in a heartbeat. It'd definitely be the ideal school for any aspiring cartoonist.

Raff said...

How good do you have to be in order to get in, and what would you want to see in an entry portfolio?

Sounds like a good first year...Being impatient as I am, I'd really be looking forward to learning how to lay out and paint backgrounds.

So many animation books repeating the same Disney 12 principles and not ONE of them can tell you how to start with gouache in the closing chapters. Why shouldn't background painting be part of an animator's knowledge, especially if he wants to do his own short indie projects?

DarkShadow8181 said...

sup john, right now im attending an art highschool, but sadly there is no animation class within the school. i plan to go into a college that teaches animation. so this would really help me out. i would love to have something like this in an actual school to teach to me or anyone else who wants to learn. this stuff is great. thanks a lot.

Bill said...

Hi John, this program sounds amazing. I just graduated school a year ago and I'd gladly take classes...are you familiar with animationmentor.com ? They teach you how to be a Pixar animator, but I'd love to see an alternative to that system out there. These classes are much needed in the industry. SIGN ME UP!

miss 3awashi thani said...

i would give my left leg to learn in a school like that!
i'm not learning anything from my current school just technical stuff...

JohnK said...

>>How good do you have to be in order to get in, and what would you want to see in an entry portfolio?<<

Good question Raff

You'd have to have obvious natural talent and since this blog has already shown what else I think is important, you'd have to show drawings and /or animation that proves you've done some of the lessons and understood them.

As far as BG painting goes, you'd probably be better off taking a good illustration course.

JohnK said...

..oh, and don't fill your portfolio with graffiti style art or flat Cartoon Network type stuff.

Ryan G. said...

>>..oh, and don't fill your portfolio with graffiti style art or flat Cartoon Network type stuff.<<

Lets here more do's and dont's John.

Johnny Mastronardi said...

Sounds like fun. Just let me finish my practical degree and pay off some of the loans. :P Seriously, though, I would love something like that.

NateBear said...

I already have a BFA for painting and whatnot. The school was so structureless that ll I learned as that it's easy to get lost. Oh, and how to analyze art house movies. Anyway, I've decided that my number one goal is to make great cartoons and i could see no better way than taking the classes you outlined. And even if i don't get teh chance to enroll in your hypothetical class i'm going to spend the next year drawing nothing but rubber hose figures from millions of angles.

Trevour said...

This is going to the printer and into a binder.

Bryan! said...

I'd sign up for JKU right now.

Thunderrobot(aka Chet) said...

i would love to go to a college like this.

Doug said...

I have been looking for my perfect medium, and I have not quite found it. Cartoons have always been interesting t me but I see what is out there on T.V and it looks like cartooning would suck right now, there is no real creativity or humor in cartoons anymore, but if there WAS something like you are talking about I would seriously consider going into the field!

Trevour said...

And oh yeah, ADD ME TO THE LIST of prospective students!

Taber said...

Yeah I would absolutely join a course like this. Dance lessons, YES! What better way to learn body mechanics and graceful beautiful motion than by DOING IT? The Caricature and Application parts of this curriculum are particularly enticing in this outline to me. I feel like I often don't have any idea how to draw a real cartoon because of this lack in my education, and I know that I like everyone else, falls back on OTHER ARTISTS' styles and visual language, rather than using observation like I should.

Go John go.

Kris said...

John,

This is what I have been thinking since you started posting the cartoon lessons on your blog. You really SHOULD be teaching full-time. You're good at it, you're an expert on the topic, and you've obviously carefully evaluated the best way to learn animation.

It would probably also pay better than doing web ads, too.

I would totally go for it once I have enough money to drop work for a while and go back to school

Dave_the_Turnip said...

I wish i could have signed up for this instead of the Art Institute of Seattle in 2002.

I'm doing a games degree now but afterwards i think i would sign up, just to improve my drawing skills (cause it's still one of my passions).

The course does sound amazing and i'm sure it would be highly sustainable.

Wicks for Candlesticks said...

Sounds like a lot of fun and a lot of work. Let's hope some form of this becomes reality.

-David O.

Enclothe said...

Sounds great! I'd love to have some of these classes with you. Maybe you should talk to the guys at Animation Mentor, you could do your own online classes.

Robert said...

My first thought is that that's a great curriculum. My second thought is that that's an awful lot of stuff to cover in one year. (I'm presuming you're wanting to do it well and not just check them off the list) I've taken college level art classes and I found that finding time to do a good job on the assignements for one class was tough. Seven...? ouch.

But as an ideal concept, I like it.

stephen rogers said...

I'd move from Canada's richest city just to be able to take part.

Looney Moon Cartoons said...

This syllabus sounds ideal for learning the basic skills needed for good cartoon animation, and no extra bullshit.

Gerhard Cruywagen said...

I'd sure as hell be interested. Only problem is I live in South Africa. Talk about a depressing animation/cartooning industry.. Everything I know is self-tought. No-one knows shit, including me. But I'd consider moving there, just to get proper animation knowledge. Always been a fan of Ren and Stimpy.. sigh.

Shawn said...

If this school actually existed, I would change my opinion of college and enroll!

Blue said...

I would definitely sign up! I can see that you definitely have a clear plan for such a great school. I've actually started my first year in a liberal arts college, so make sure you have a good program for all the transfer students who'd want to get into your school!

Colin said...

I'd sign up

Andy J. Latham said...

My comment will no doubt be lost amongst all the ones that have been posted so far, but I'd just like to mention the fact that I desperately want to follow a course like this, but cannot afford to do so.

I believe I have the talent to do well on such a course but I don't have the funds.

If you stared such a course, would you cater for people like me John?

-----------------------------
Visit Andy's Animation!

foist lastus said...

I have ten years teaching experience in the city of Chicago. I would be interested in re-locating, maybe going in with other aspiring cartoonists to buy/rent a house?

I would be interested in helping you develop the online program, based on the experiences from the live classes.

Paul B said...

SIGN ME UP JOHN!!

I WANT THE LINDY HOP DANCE ELECTIVE, AND THE SWING CLASS IN MUSIC, HEHEHEHE!

Rafi animates said...

sounds amazing. I would sign up. Only thing is, I'm in the UK, so no go.

unless ofcourse the school you create is conducted entirely online, like the infrastructure of animationmentor.com

just a thought.

DJ said...

good stuff!! i'll join in such a school!

May be you could do an online school for 2d animation! it could work!

DJ

Mitch said...

Woot! Sign me up :)

I would do it if I have a chance!

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

Sign me up right now! This is the best animation and cartooning curriculum I've ever seen!

Chris said...

My internet died when I posted, so sorry if this is a double post.

If you had an animation program like that I'd sign up for it in a heart beat. I'd finish up my technical degree and register immediately afterwords, no hesitation whatsoever.

I'd also be interested to know who you had in mind to fill the faculty roles for the courses if you could get anyone you wanted.

Chris

I are da cute one said...

I would go... I thinki don't have a reason not to want to...

Colter said...

I'd sign up for this!

Josh Latta said...

I 'd chuck all responsibilities out the window to take this course. I always regretted not attending art school. This is what I always wanted to do!
Yeah, sign me up- Here's my check.

Brilliantpants said...

That sounds like the most wonderful school in the whole wide world. About A THOUSAND MILLION BILLION times better than where I went.

Except that we did have a pretty great Animation History Class, that's like my favourite subject ever.


Okay, that sounds unfair, I don't actually hate my school, I just feel really, really gyped by it.

crolyss said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Aggie said...

Oooo! If this happens, maybe you'll let me do a lecture on film/tv music (maybe cartoon music?) after I finish university! This is such a fun idea!

Mr. Austin said...

I give animators a heap of credit. I've not the patience nor the skill to accomplish what the worst of them have and do. However, I love to learn and anything can help.

I'd be interested in a school like that.

Anaheim said...

I'd certainly be interested in doing something like this as a masters program (since I'm almost done with an undergrad in Painting)

Peggy said...

Woo, that looks pretty hardcore. My school wished it could be that.

Random reactions:

The amount of emphasis on 3D in the current industry could be a problem - while I keep hearing that places like Pixar prefer to train in tools, not animation, bringing in someone for some electives in basic modelling could help. Or, hell. Bring in someone to clue folks in about sculpting. Give folks the basics of taking their 2D imagery and pushing it back into 3D with their own hands. I dunno. I figure you're going to address this in years 2-4 somewhere. You don't want to crank out folks who can do nothing but 3D - but a touch of familiarity with the basics might be cool.

Also, I'm looking at the examples you chose for 'funny drawings' and realizing they're all pretty grotesque. How much of the laughter at a funny drawing is nervous laughter? I'd never really thought of it from that angle before. You could probably spend most of that phase of the drawing class by bringing in funny examples and just asking yourself and the class "what makes this funny?' Have the students bring in funny stuff, too.

I love the idea of dance. I took some ballet when I was young; it didn't stick as a Thing I Do, but it helped make me aware of the body's motion.

Having a library available would be cool too. Pile up all the inspirational work you can find, encourage students to pick out books at random and see what they discover. Give them the tools to draw outside of 'style', the tools to analyze a style... and lots of different ones to play with.

:: smo :: said...

i've been working in new york for a little over 2 years and i've been considering stopping and just doing something like this on my own.

it's a great idea.

James said...

Yup, definitely I'd attend.

Ryan Dunlavey said...

I wish you had this class 15 years ago so I didn't waste my time and money on a stupid illustration degree, which taught me nothing.

Paul Stadden said...

I wish something like this had been available at my college. I want to go back for a Masters at some point and if a course like this were available, I'd do what it takes to get my degree and work on these lessons at the same time. Especially since I know that if I put the work in, I'll get good results.

So, if you shop around at schools to get this course started at a real university, please come to North Florida, I'd like a chance to check it out!

Max Ward said...

I would go back to school for this. I wish you would have done this years ago before I payed all this money for art school.

pBn said...

I'd go to any school with a calendar like that (so long as the teachers were seasoned pro's and it was endorsed by J.K.).

Brian "My Fault" Nicolucci said...

This would be an amazing curriculum.

I wanna be in whatever class Eddie will be teaching!

Wonkey the Monkey said...

This sounds great! But it also sounds like 2 years of material, not one.

The most valuable part (judging from your descriptions) - inbetweening senior students' work - would also be the most time-consuming. Depending on the director of the project, an inbetweener could end up spending all their time tweening and no time on their own classwork!

The toy design is a nice idea, but I'd make it an elective. If basic construction is being taught properly, everyone should be learning to draw characters from all angles anyway.

Joseph Luster said...

I would most definitely sign up for something like this. I wish it had been around back when I started school, because I probably would have taken a different direction!

Jeff Esterby said...

I would love to do this - might actually get me to bother with school for a change if I knew I was actually being taught something I could use.

larnman2 said...

I was actually just reading a letter I got from an art institute that I had requested info from. I felt disappointed because what they seemed to offer was a mashup of basic drawing classes, and the program I'm in now. Weak. I'm Digital media design right now, for a few thousand a year.Why are they calling it animation in Pennsylvania, and charging ten times as much? What you show sounds like what I had expected.I am scared and confused.

Craig D said...

Ooooh... That mandatory dance class is a deal-breaker for me. But, then again, I am 'way outside the intended demographic.

Basically, this would be moving your blog-lessons off of the internet and into the "real world" and that is an excellent idea!

AND DON"T FORGET THE WEEKLY FIELD-TRIPS TO AND VOLUNTEER WORK FOR THE ASIFA-HOLLYWOOD ANIMATION ARCHIVE!

Rick Eller said...

absolutely! You're idea to structure the curriculum in the spirit of the old school method of breaking into the business is inspired! I also love the list of entertainers you mentioned as a point of study.I'd sign up in a heartbeat!

David said...

Sign me up. Sounds like a dream come true.

Ryan said...

I'd pay good money for that school.

/\/\ikeB said...

Hey John, little off topic ( only a little ) check this out:

http://mistertoast.blogspot.com/2007/09/evolution-of-sugar-bear.html

murrayb said...

have you seen what the pixar guys are doing?
www.animationmentor.com

(click trailer)

they charge a pretty penny, it seems pretty slick.

myles said...

sounds great!

JohnK said...

A couple people have noted that 7 classes may be too much for one year, so maybe I'd move one or 2 to the second year.

Or only do a half of year of a couple.

Thanks for the enthusiasm!

If only such a school existed.

Chris S. said...

SIGN ME UP, JOHN K! That school sounds perfect.

The problem would be money. I'm going to AAU online because my work (a warehouse!) actually pays my tuition as long as the school's accredited. I haven't gotten very far yet.

How about this, John - hire a group of capable students to work under you and produce shorts. I would transfer from Ohio to my company's branch in L.A. and work every other waking hour in your studio. I think I have what it takes and I'd have no problem with the dance classes - I was a tap dancer growing up (by force - my sister owns a dance studio and thought she could get more boys to join). However, I learned to appreciate it.

Fco. de Borja said...

John,
Your course looks amazing, is the kind of animation school I would love to have attended. You can’t imagine how lame my animation classes where.

Dooley said...

If only a curriculum like that existed, I'd sign up in a heartbeat.

Oliver_A said...

Providing your own animation courses and thus share your valuable knowledge and experience with the upcoming generation of cartoonists is the best way to finally make a difference and change the way animation is made, again. If this happens, we can, for sure, cherish the times which are about to come!

grantarctica said...

I'd sign up for it!

chris said...

I REALLY need to take this course!

More than Jake said...

I would love to do something like this! It would be simply amazing!!

Mitch K said...

What about painting and layout? I'd love to have a class that starts with scapes and portraits which then leads into more stylized and specific bg design.

Your figure drawing classes sound great! Gestures only teach people how to draw tricks. I hate gesture drawing class.

JohnK said...

>>What about painting and layout? I'd love to have a class that starts with scapes and portraits which then leads into more stylized and specific bg design.<<

What's a "scape"? Is that the 'ground behind the 'toons?

Just kidding.

Layout would happen in 2nd or third year. I don't know if I would include BG painting except as an elective.

I would not encourage anything flat and stylized. That would be stealing your money.

Jennifer said...

Wow, what an amazing curriculum!! People with artistic talents should sign up ASAP!!

I have a question, John - couldn't you open up a school and teach these courses? I picture this school like the "Neigborhood Playhouse" for animation.

You may have to recruit someone to help you with the day-to-day administrative things, like getting you accredited so your students can get financial aid to attend and doing all the boring paperwork.

honkeykong.com said...

would take it in a heart beat

LeoBro said...

This sounds like a great curriculum. I probably wouldn't have understood it if I hadn't been reading your blog all along. Especially the emphasis on rubber-hose. But having read your explanation earlier, it makes total sense.

I'm glad you're putting so much emphasis on drawing, and much less on animating, in the first year. When I first starting trying to learn animation, I assumed the best strategy would be to start animating, and learn things like drawing technique along the way. I got psych'd reading books like "Animator's Survival Kit", but I got nowhere in practice. I soon realized that the animator's skill is in making still drawings that are already animated, in that each drawing must have dimension, motion, balance, emotion, force, gravity, etc. I'm still learning so much from just copying the Preston Blair drawings (thank you very much!). Most animation curricula start you off immediately with the bouncing ball, and then move to walk cycles. But it's pointless if you haven't learned drawing fundamentals.

You should make it clear what prerequisites the students should have before beginning the first year. Your curriculum is assuming the student already has a lot of drawing skills; you should make it clear exactly what you expect.

As for gesture drawings, there are actually two different things that go by that name. I'm pretty sure that you're talking about "gesture drawings" as popularized by Kimon Nicolaides, where your scribbles are supposed to represent the motion or gesture of the subject but not the form. These may have some value for beginning artists, but since they require zero skill and take only seconds to draw, only a fool would include them in a portfolio. The other kind of "gesture drawing" is that taught by Walt Stanchfield. These are also quick sketches based on a live model, but the goal here is to not only represent the figure, but improve on it by using principles such as line of action, clear silhouette, forced perspective, etc, in order to capture the essence of the motion or attitude in a strong, emotional pose. I'm not saying your curriculum would be amiss to not include this type of gesture drawing, but I did want to point out the distinction.

I'm not sure if you're serious about the toys. If you are, I can also see value in actually making clay sculptures of cartoon characters to help visualize their solidity and dimensionality.

Anders said...

This is such a great idea. I'm assuming you would be very selective with students right?

If it costs less than 65,000 wing-wangs I'll drop my current school for it. Scratch that first part. If this becomes a reality then I would drop my current school for it.

G.M. dela Cruz said...

Where and how do I sign up? Will it be pricey? but heck! this is gonna be worth it.

e. banks said...

a major usually requires 8 classes over 4 years.
i'd sign up for this in a second. sounds way better than the animation program here at nyu

PCUnfunny said...

I would enrole as well but may I make a suggetsion ? Have a course about the proper way to write cartoons.

Fernando Ladislao said...

If such a school existed... Yes, it's really possible I would like to join, no matter the distance nor the price.
A place where finally stop listening to crap about art compared with magic.
A place free of that awful "Nah, it's just a little practice and that's it. Do everything as it comes out and if somebody doesn't understand, it's their problem. You are an artist, who can say that what you do is wrong?".
A place devoted to understand the principles that make art feel like magic, that's something else.
Man, if that existed...

Evan said...

You don't have to start a NEW school
CalArts is currently looking for a new director for their Character Animation Program.
http://calarts.edu/employment/academicjobs/directorprogramcharacteranimation
They Already have good Life drawing and music and dance for electives. They just need a visionary like you.
You should get in there and kick some ass!

flashcartoons said...

you should make a school

John K Animation School

i believe if you did this, all your students would make a change in the animation world.

cause face it, exects are not getting any younger

i would join your school!

Guillaume Pageau said...

Yessss!!

I don't care for the money, this is priceless. It's a goldmine of informations and exercises.

Callum said...

Sorry, posted my response in the wrong topic.

Best post yet.Maybe one day animation schools actually follow these guidelines (We can hope. I'd definitely join a school like this.

Oh, and if anyone cares, I've updated my blog with lots of EU comics stuff (Shameless promotion)

Dungeon Warden said...

I agree that this would be an excellent first year course in Animation. I was fortunate to attend an animation school that encouraged individualized freedom to experiment with different types of animation.

Beyond what you suggest here, we also learned to use computers to create art. We used Painter, Photoshop, Illustrator, Maya, Flash, Premier, and Audacity to create backgrounds, animation, and sound for out animation projects.

I have to disagree on your comment that scribbles have no place in animation. Scribbles are a good way to work out timing for a complex action. You can quickly create and throw away dozens of drawings until you get the timing right. Then you can put the roughs over the scribbles, check the animation again and clean it up.

I think the reason that a lot of animation is stiff is because no one takes the time to scribble out the action first to get the timing down before working on the animation.

Scribbles also help with story boarding. You can quickly draw up a bunch of panels, discarding the ones that don't work, until you have the basics for the plot. Then you can do more detailed drawing to show to others.

I think that I read that you do this yourself, John. So I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss gesture drawings.

diego cumplido said...

I'd get the money to get into that school and travel and stuff. sign me up.

Freckled Derelict said...

Count me in. I would LOVE to go to that college!!!

Sean Worsham said...

When do you think you'll start this school John? How much would you charge per year and will it be in LA?

Sean Worsham said...

If it is in LA I'd have a perfect excuse to move there.

Sean Worsham said...

Would you also do Master's Degree courses?

Sean Worsham said...

Plus would you try to get Mike and Eddie to teach there?

T.E.B. said...

This post made me reflect on my college life so far, and I have to say I don't like where I am at right now. Going to bull crap community college, surrounded by bull crap "animation" schools (Full Sail, the Dave school; which by the way, is a portable trailer behind Universal Studios Orlando, Art Institute, etc). My dad telling me to "stop drawing your damn cartoons" and get your bullshit degree that isn't worth the parchment it's printed on.

Hell, I just have one more class and that'll be that! So yes, I will walk, hitchhike, or hijack to this animation college, to finally learn skills for what I always loved to do, and to get away from my house.

Charlie J. said...

id be honored to go to a college like this!

Ryan G. said...

Im not sure about the dance.. I can see where you're going with it but maybe lean towards a music theory class. Also, dont forget about some art history classes specifically oriented toward classic animation/animators. A sculpting class would be cool for understanding 3d form.

>>A couple people have noted that 7 classes may be too much for one year, so maybe I'd move one or 2 to the second year.<<

7 classes too much? Is this a semester system or quarter? Usually 4 classes a semester is the standard. So thats 8 classes a year. Quarter systems you can take 3-4 classes a year. Thats 12-16 classes a year. Any less and you'll be going to John K. U. for 8 years.

Ryan G. said...

Oh yeah and some acting classes.

John Pannozzi said...

I'd enroll. By the way, John, did you know Ralph Bakshi started his own school a few years ago?
http://www.ralphbakshi.com/blog/archives/000014.html

NateBear said...

I think "Spum U" woudl be the perfect school name. And it'd have the best mascots ever!

Nico said...

I would definately enroll, John. Just thinking of classes like these, with you or Eddie or whoever teaching them, makes me enthralled. Where do I sign up??

akira said...

sounds SO awesome! if the price is reasonable i'd definitely TRY to get in. i think you've said before that you didn't think people over a certain age could learn to do cartoon drawing.. is there a maximum age?

i think you should be pretty strict on grading and put people on probation and expel them if they're slacking too much.. i think College of the Canyons in Valencia was looking for a new animation department head, too.. are you thinking about an LA school or Canadian? i think canada would be a better setting for cracking down on animation, myself.. but i guess if you're totally dedicated you should be able to learn anywhere.

akira said...

come on! the number of classes doesnt matter i'm sure you're not going to give more homework than is humanly possible so as long as you consider that it doesn't matter.. and some classes could last longer than others or meet more times per week.. i think the most hours per week of classes i took in college was like 18 so i think seven or eight 2 hour classes plus a figure drawing "lab" wouldn't be bad

Anna said...

Yes. Sign me up.

Josh "Just What the Doctor Ordered" Heisie said...

Oh yes. Since I was in grade nine I wanted to take an animation and film course after high school, but since the other animation schools are so overpriced and crappy I'm just sticking to film school.

I've looked at the portfolios of these other schools, and I know that I can teach myself more than I'd learn in school. I can already draw better than alot of the portfolios I've seen and I'm just out of high school.

I'm not about to spend $30,000 on a crappy course that won't teach me more than I can do on my own. I WOULD spend good money on a course like yours. It sounds like it would teach skills and guide you on your way to your own style, rather than being forced into another style by default.

That's why for now I'm sticking with film school. They teach you how to run the equipment and basic knowledge and stuff, then you grow from there.

Spencer said...

I would *definately* be interested in something like this

Denis said...

John, I'd have to say the curriculum proves to be a practical introduction to animation. I say you're on to something with this SpumCollege idea of yours. Lets see if you can deliver something like that on the east coast as well ;D

Scotty said...

OMG... that sounds absolutely amazing. But how come you aren't running the School already??!! Actually, to be honest your Blog is one of the best online tutorials I have ever read. Don't ever, ever stop!

Check out my Ren'n'Stimpy tribute to you, if you have the time John.

Thomas said...

I'm just a lowly illustrator, but I'd be very interested in enrolling in a school set up by you. The fundamentals and Theory you teach me every day blow my mind, and I think i've learned a lot from you in the past few months of being a reader. I'm amazed at how the things you teach can be applied to all illustration and drawing techniques, mediums, and styles

but yeah, i say up with the school

kyle said...

I would definitely attend this school.I want to go to Sheridan college next year for the animation program, you often talk about your issues with CalArts. What are your thoughts on Sheridan?

amir avni said...

The program you're describing is exactly what young cartoonists need, not only the topics, but also the order, the learning curve. Every topic naturally leads to the next. This is a recipe for success!

If you plan to pitch this program to an existing school, look into keeping control of the curriculum as if it was your constitution.
I'm not sure how can it be done, but it's important to address, since schools are in the habit of shifting and changing their programs.

Kyle M said...

I would definitely go to a school like this. I am planning on going to Sheridan College next year for animation. You seem to have many issues with CalArts, I'm wondering what your thoughts on Sheridan are.

Clinton said...

Sign me up! Even if you are not seriously considering starting a school, this curriculum should be something all art schools should follow. I hope they are listening....are you listening Art Institute?! Keep us all updated on the school, u dig? because you have over 100 hungry wannabeyourstudents here right now :)

Colter said...

I'm enrolled! Hardy, har, har, har!

Yeah yeah.. rub it in.

Kim said...

Exciting!!!

I'd move country for a chance like that.

I'm nowhere near good enough now, but if I work hard maybe by the time this school becomes a reality I could be.

bug said...

that looks like a great school and id love to go there.

Brian Romero said...

John, be sure to offer night courses so a 33 year old cartoonist like me could still enroll! Seriously though, have you considered teaching small classes privately? I'm sure there are tons of people who'd pay good money for classes and workshops with you.

The GagaMan(n) said...

I would quit the current "animation" course I'm in the last year of right now and fly over to America for this! =D

The GagaMan(n) said...

Of course, I'm pretty sure I wouldn't get in. My stuff at current is still far too flat with no real construction.. =(

Clinton said...

Oh, and if you need an IT guy to help you handle all your computer needs, I am your guy! What can we all do to help you evoke this school?

NextGen said...

Sign me up! I've been asking you to start your own school in the comments for a while now.

I would so sign up! So long as it was affordable though.

Imagine having a "art school quality" school at community college prices? Wow, that would really shake things up in the industry.

I would sign up on day one for classes if they were affordable.

Christopher said...

Hey I am currently attending The Art Institute of pittsburgh, and I am studying animation. But I have to say I am completely hateing it and would love to go to a school like the one you are describing. AIP does nothing to even help an animator truly animate. You have to take a few drawing classes that don't even help animate or caricature, or draw cartoons, The teachers just don't want to help you they want it their way or no way, and there are absolutly no class for animation there. It more like ok here is what you have to do and they make you do it, Same with the so so called "Animation" Courses. So if you wanted to start up this school I would immediatly drop out from the art institute and go and sign up for your school.

jesus chambrot said...

God dammit JOhn, open your school already! You have a brand name. People know who you are. Its like the Joe Kubert School of Cartooning in New York.

You'll have to find A school in your neck of the woods that would let you run the program as you see fit. That includes hiring who you see fit and not have some bull-shit school officials hire who they see fit.
In other words, you gotta run this shit your own way. I know it would be hard to do but you have to do it. I'm sure if you started with a small first year class of 25 student freshmen, then each year you have a new class of freshmen until the program ha s 100 people.
And make sure you hire people that love good-old fashioned cartoons to teach cause in my experience a lot of animation schools kind of look down on cartoons.

Can Dela said...

I´d love to go to that cartoon school... but i live in Argentina...!and i´m moving to Australia next year! So unless there´s an online alternative, i´m afraid i won´t... :( An online course would be great!

peldma3 said...

Get this school going! We NEDD it!!!!!

A little fish said...

I'd do it in a heartbeat. Being a cartoonist is my dream.

David Germain said...

I think the first year students should inbetween and cleanup the 3rd and 4th year students' animation.

I suggested this very idea at my school. I remember one student shouting it down saying "I don't want some first year touching my film." PHHT!

That does sound like a very good course. I'd love to go through it if I had more time and more money. Just last night I stayed up until 2 A.M. Just to finish all the scenes I had to animate right at the dead line. Whew!

Yeah, I don't see how anyone could turn down such a curriculum. However, I've learned from experience that you must make sure that someone reputable and honest is handling the money. The school won't even last a year without that.

Jorge Garrido said...

COUNT ME IN!! But can I finish my MBA first? I'll do your accounting!

The Butcher said...

I would definetely take the class, but not choose dancing on the electives. I hate dancing, and that alone would probably be enough for you to not take me as a student.

Sean Worsham said...

I'd take dancing, it's all about trying new things. That and it wouldn't hurt in impressing your partner in a dance date.

Trevour said...

I was thinking about this all day and I think it's the best idea ever. A John K. school would actually be a solid step in bringing good cartoons back into society.

Andrew Smith said...

I've been reading this blog for a while now and I have been putting a lot of what I read here to use in my own work (to very good effect). If ever a school like this existed I would most certainly attend.

David said...

Count me in, also.
This curriculum sounds exciting and I'd pay for it.

PCUnfunny said...

Hey John. I put up a Preston Blair darwing and attempt to copy classic cartoons.

Tony C. said...

This is a helluva idea! It would be awesome if you combined the classroom lessons with an online element like you are currently doing. That way the rest of us can still follow along at home.

Craig said...

The course described sounds quite similar to what I am taking at the Vancouver Institute of Media Arts (vanarts.com)

It's worth checking out. All instructors are people who work/have worked in animation and are passionate about it.

Sant Arellano said...

Sign me up!!!

LampshadeMan said...

Unfortunately, I just graduated from college, (Though overall, I am pretty happy with my education, mine had a pretty good 2D animation program) but if I had another 40 K in loans to waste on college, I’d pick this one. (Just read the post about animating to beats, definitely didn’t learn that in school, going to have to give that lesson a try.)

So here is a vote for the next group of Super Animators that will come out of the John K School of Animation!

Micah said...

Hey, John.
I'm already in debt from my first cartoon college. But I think that a few thousand more wouldn't be too much to spend on this! It's a good idea and I'd do it!

MitchLoidolt said...

John,
I'd undoubtedly go back in time and redo my college career if I had a curriculum such as this.

I cannot say that I regret the teacher I've had for 2D animation, because she actually does focus on the things you've pointed out, but the classes just weren't long enough (3 months, twice a week).

The wellrounded approach you've laid out just seems so inspiring. It would also take extremely dedicated students to go through such a gauntlet.

Anyway... I'd like to see it in effect.

Jason Tammemägi said...

As someone who has been through animation college and saw what skills I was lacking when I went out into the world (still lacking many of those skills ten years later) and someone who has to look through many portfolios and showreels every year, I can safely say that this sounds like an excellent course.

Your points about application are spot-on. So many skills (like life drawing) are completely useless if students don't learn from them and apply them to their animation (and why the hell do people fill their portfolios with 95% life drawing? You're not applying for a position of 'life drawer'!).

The only bit I wasn't sure about was the 3D drawing from toys aspect only because so many cartoon constructions don't have angles that work in 3 dimensions and I've seen many people create horrible drawings by just not accepting the fact that what they are creating is in fact a 2D image.

I would probably put more emphasis on modern programs like Flash and so on too as people have to jacks of all trades in the current climate. But, hey, that's just me.

You've hit on so many aspects that are missing from the work I see. At least over this side of the world.

Sounds like a great course. I reckon your blog is already required reading for people learning animation and there are skills that are dying out (even the bland skills you don't like are getting worse and worse) that need to be nurtured and pushed. I really hope you get this course off the ground.

Robert said...

If you're looking for something to shift into the second year, I'd think Caricature is an advanced topic that probably is beyond first year scope.

I'm a bit doubtful that there is enough industry demand for 2D animators in the USA to warrant another school. There's already a glut of 3D animators here, I suspect the prospects for 2D guys are even dimmer.

Rob said...

Where do I sign?

George said...

I'd definitely sign up for this. What better opportunity for thoroughness and rigor than at an animation school? This sounds great. Sign me up!

I've done a lot of 2D and 3D animation as a hobby over the years and have wanted to make the skill professional. I enjoy 2D a lot more than 3D for the sheer freedom of it, but the current state of the industry has brought me some pause. The old stuff is what's really inspiring. I'd imagine that if more animators got their skills from a program like this the trends might actually start to change.

Dan said...

I would have relished a course like this. As it is, at the age of nineteen I signed up to do a foundation year in art to learn drawing and animation, and found myself leaving six weeks later, utterly crushed.

Vincent Waller said...

Build it and they will come.
No surprise there.

Ben Forbes said...

3D animation is lifeless and I dont get why people are so amazed by it. It has not personality like the classic cartoons did. Imagine your favourite Clampett Cartoon in 3D. It'd probably lose all of the specianl qualities it used to have. I know you hate Disney but I really hope their 2D feature film The Frog Princess does well so people can get back to 2D animation.

Phillip Skeen said...

Sounds a lot more effective than the Bakshi school.

:: smo :: said...

one thing i noticed people saying a lot is things like "this would be more than one year..."

but on an idealistic front, were you going to school based on learning vs a degree, ALL your classes could be focused on animation.

for a degree program it might ened to be split up some.

i think this would work well with a quarter system vs. semesters too.

things like figure and some sort of music should really be every quarter even if the class is just once a week.

things like applications and the history of animation class could be taught simultaneously with other drawing based courses too.

i think it's a solid track.

pixelmark042 said...

I would definately attend! It would be a huge success, I think, and a big plus to the entire animation industry to have more animators with your understanding.

Leigh Fieldhouse said...

Hey John,
you should set this up as an online school/curriculm as you have a global gathering of people who would love to be part of your course!

Benjamin De Schrijver said...

I think an important question should be: who'd be GENUINELY interested in paying big dough for this. Maybe not $100k, but say, about half of it: 15k a year. The value of an official diploma is vastly diminishing, and in art doesn't have the biggest impact anyway. Now, I'm probably underestimating such an endeavour, but still: If you could get, say, only 5 people to join for the first year (which of course is a risk, since it's impossible to already garantuee a second year - but Animation Mentor had plenty of students taking the same risk). That'd be 75k for the first year. I don't know L.A. prices, but would that be too little to rent a small classroom and still have some on the side, either as your paycheck or to invest back into it later? Combine that with more of your commercial work, and is it really absolutely impossible to start such a school? I mean, in a way, you had to pay talented students so you could teach them at Spumco. Would it be so absolutely implausable to set up such a school if they're now paying you?

Even though I wouldn't be one joining (I think it's a great curriculum - but if you remember my past comments you know my animation sensibilities lie a bit elsewhere, and I have recently finally met someone who can really mentor and teach me in drawing, plus add to that I live in Belgium and wouldn't have the money), I'd love to see the cartoon industry get back on its true feet, and see cartoons in the classic sense again, so I'm really just trying to make this idea a more tangible and real one here.

Craig Harris said...

I'd sign up today if it was available.

Adam G said...

This is a really good idea.

Callum said...

Would there be any requirements for entry into this theoretical school?
Seriously, I'm sure you could open this school and charge whatever you want, people would go to it.

Hammerson said...

I wanna be a member, wanna be a member :)

What a fabulous idea! Every step in the program looks incredibly well thought out, and completely logical (yes, even dance lessons). You'll produce a whole generation of super-cartoonists ready to bring back some fun in animation, and save this decaying world. I live probably as far from L.A. as humanly possible, but I'd sign up.

Johaannes said...

I'm 15 old and serching for a god animation school! If this school existed i would Be there sleep there and die there!

benj said...

Same as Brian here:
"Seriously though, have you considered teaching small classes privately? I'm sure there are tons of people who'd pay good money for classes and workshops with you."

Roo said...

yes sir i like it

Grey said...

dearest John,
i ve been reading this thing for a while now, and i gotta say reading about this school made me giddy.

i went to a school to learn how to animate, and it sucked. i graduated knowing not much more than when i went in.

the other problem i had with it was that they hated anything funny that i did. they wanted everything to be their way, which i could understand to a point, but not later on in the program.

start this school, and i guarantee you i ll eat bugs and grass in that order so i can afford tuition.

--brian

Chris said...

I think whats wrong with art schools is that the do not encourage specialization. John's theory of how to teach animation can be applied to any art. If specialized hard theory and practice of painting were encouraged over new-agey "exploration" we would end up with better painters. I'm not saying that exploration is bad, but why emphasize rule breaking before knowing the rules?

Treasure said...

This would be such a dream come true! I'd pay anything to go to a school like yours!

Tyson said...

I'm currently enrolled at SCAD, and I would take your class in an instant. I don't always agree with what you have to say, but it's always enlightening to say the very least. I've already garnered alot from my few visits to your blog, and learning under you would be a treat.

in short, SCAD. come to it. please.

Malkan said...

i'd sing up in a heart beat!
the only problem is that im from south america and the US is really expensive... i mean reeealy... :(

Jose said...

elective suggestion:

krupa facial contortions 101

Jose said...

also: dancing isn't gay.

gene kelly will kill you.

Erik Griott said...

john,
i have been following your blog for almost as long as i have been at the art institute, and you have continually helped me realize how much of an education i'm NOT getting! i, and a number of my colleagues would back your program to the fullest!

i'm was getting excited just reading your post, i can't wait for it to come true!!!

make it happen and the world would be a better place!

NextGen said...

Seriously John make this happen! You live in Burbank don't you? That would be the perfect spot to put the school. Tons of studios there... and I live nearby (Panorama City... next to Van Nuys) -- so I would sooooo go.

Brett W. Thompson said...

Oh wow :) I would go in a second. :)

sarah j. said...

Jose: Exactly.

Queefy, Gene Kelly will kick your face in with his steel-reinforced tap shoe, then finish the job by crushing your thorax between his massive dancer's thighs before you even hit the floor. He will then seduce your girlfriend through a series of leaps, turns, and a furious little tap number.

Don't diss the dance. Or Gene Kelly will get you.

Rodd said...

Alright, count me in too.

First, I'll have to "unlearn" some things the industry has shoved down my throat as well as work on getting back the life that was sucked out of me throughout bad projects.

That Clockwork Orange scene where the eyes are pried open to be made to watch horrible movies while Beethoven plays in the background comes to mind for reconditioning.

Octo said...

It is exactly what we need.
I wish we had a school like that.
If it was a reality, I would sign up for it imediately.

Barbara said...

That school sounds like it would be badass, but what seems to be missing in there are classes about color. You've covered all of the tools of an animator quite well, but more than that I think anyone in an art field of work needs to have some kind of art foundations that extends beyond just life drawing. Color, composition, structure and all that jazz. They pound color theory into us at my school, and I'm glad.

Other than that, I can tell that if you started up this school it would beat out a lot of the BS art schools I've had the displeasure to know.

Julián höek said...

i think it's lacking some stuff that made the golden age animators so great.
the artistic background they must have i'm sure it's was wider than construction for cartoons. Looking at the amazing stuff carlo vici did in his own time you can see what kind of training he must had to be so good. Life drawing is good i think and better the way you wanna teach it but perhaps it would also be great to have stuff like sculpture, painting, color theory and aplication and a bunch of fine art subjects.
i think those guy where very very compleat artist and craftmans and not only for cartoons. i'm still amazed about those vicci ilustrancion!! He could do the flintstones, clasical paintings and kind of a norman rockwell tipe of illustration, mostly for his huge talent but his formation sure helped!
pershaps that kind of school with very solid subject will make the cartoonist be able to do the impossible with they're pencils again.
i would love that kind of training!


Julian from Argentina

jeremy said...

I'm so glad you are going to teach this!

Another route you might consider is doing a course over the internet -- I stumbled upon some art courses at www.schoolism.com which are taught through weekly movie clips through a flash player. Really, your blog inspired me to take them since I was so desperate to take a class and get some professional critique (luckily I got my job to pay for it).

The way they work is you watch a video clip which is basically a class -- showing inspiration, techniques, process, approaches, examples, watching the artist producing stuff in real time, then you get a week to do an assignment, then the students submit the assignment over the web, then the teacher critiques your assignment with the same video technology, going over students' work on the screen and telling them where they are going right and going wrong. Students get to watch everyone else's critiques on each lesson as well.

There are drawbacks and it's not ideal, but it seems like a pretty low-overhead solution, except maybe for some initial web development. Heck, maybe that website would be interested in your curriculum. It could be a way to go until you get your school in the "real world." I've learned much more than I thought I would through them.

I think you are charismatic enough to be a very inspiring teacher, which is half the battle, really. You need to do something like this so people like me learn more than the flat-graphic cartoon network style. I've been doing most of your preston blair assignments, but they are on hold while I'm taking this new class. I After this course is over I'm going to finish my bosko loop! Of course I'll take your course!

crazyharmke said...

I would cross the ocean to go to your school ^_^

Jon Hanson said...

I'd give my left nut to go to a school like that!

Sykomantis said...

I'm just starting to get into drawing, so this sounds like an excellent sample curriculum. SIGN ME UP! (comment 199, woot!)

bruce said...

Hey, it's a great idea. Would be good if it were online. I like the format of animationmentor.com
I am saying this because I'm sure there are many people like me who are in places like Australia, but are dead keen to do something like this.

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