Tuesday, December 04, 2007

Korea Notes 4

Here's the last of my notes to overseas service studios. I hope they were helpful to someone out there!

On my last Korean show, the animators took our layouts and merely inbetweened them. The effect was that everyone floated from pose to pose. Nothing was favored. It was like the characters were underwater. It cost a fortune in retakes. We oughta just bring animation back to the country. Some of the budgets I've seen on modern flat shows could easily afford real animation. I see the shows and can't figure out where the money went.
Sometimes when people clean up animators' drawings, the characters end up fatter. That's because the clean up artist is drawing his lines on the outside of the animator's lines, rather than right on top.












Thanks to all these folks who donated. Did I miss anyone?

David Mackenzie



How to keep organized when doing storyboards...(for TV)


COMING UP...

A genius animator on early Betty Boops, unfettered by Disney rules.

1942 - the height of creative and skilled animation.

Toy Construction 2 - a Knickerbocker Jinks - drawn in flash layer by layer using wiggly flash tools

27 comments:

Josh Latta said...

Can't wait to see Mr.Jinks! I always wondered how to get good thick to thins with Flash.

Sphyzex_9 said...

"Oh, remind me to tell you about the difference between invention and variations on a theme."

xyling said...

I'd love to see some animated examples of what evenly spaced inbetweening looks like in comparism to doing it RIGHT.

Gesh said...

Very Excited for Early Betty Boop post!

Bitter Animator said...

>>I see the shows and can't figure out where the money went.<<

Probably not into the pockets of the animators unfortunately.

But it's a good question. Where does the money go? Anyone know how the budgets break down?

David Mackenzie said...

Nice stuff John. But yeah, ya missed me! I'm David Mackenzie.

JohnK said...

Whoops, sorry David!

I added you.

Thanks loads!

Mitch Leeuwe said...

"A genius animator on early Betty Boops, unfettered by Disney rules.

1942 - the height of creative and skilled animation.

Toy Construction 2 - a Knickerbocker Jinks - drawn in flash layer by layer using wiggly flash tools"

Can't wait!

I.D.R.C. said...

On my last Korean show, the animators took our layouts and merely inbetweened them. The effect was that everyone floated from pose to pose. Nothing was favored.

It amazes me to learn that such basic things were beyond your control. Until this blog I had no appreciation for how difficult it is to get something good done anymore, even if you are trying really hard.

Even I who have not wanted a cartoon career in maybe 30 years know enough about in-betweening to know that you can't just space all the drawings evenly, if you want it to look like anything dynamic.

I guess part of the problem is all the hack shows out there that don't even care about this stuff. They have the effect of devolving the skill level of the industry since skill isn't much needed to do what they want done.

Rodrigo said...

Good notes. Lots of these pitfalls are gold for wouldbe cartoon makers. I know I'm grateful.

I've often wondered the same thing myself. I don't understand how we save money by having oversea studios make drawings--ESPECIALLY with this digital age.

I made a stupid short toon this past weekend that might amuse you. Give it a gander if you wish.
link

Dan DeHaan said...

It's too bad the Koreans screwed up on your drawings of boners. Oh wait. Sorry. Just clicked on the image to zoom in. Not boners.

Bill Drastal Blog Mode!! said...

"We oughta just bring animation back to the country. Some of the budgets I've seen on modern flat shows could easily afford real animation. I see the shows and can't figure out where the money went."

The money goes to pay for catered lunches and so the producer's can go to millionaire dinner.

Robert said...

Wow, those inbetweening mistakes are just like what Richard Williams complains about in his book. I guess those are "classic" mistakes that will never die.

Clinton said...

yup im on there, "sugacrcl". keep the lectures and demos and knowledge comin, John

Robert Peterson said...

I agree, the animation should stay in the country.

Charlie J. said...

Im glad some people have high standards about what this stuff looks like when it comes back... thanks!

Chris N. said...

Hi John,

Thanks for the lessons.

Your last list of contributors was on 10/23. I think you missed a few...

Raff said...

What kind of budgets do those flat shows typically get?

Jenny said...

Ah, my dear old pal...known in our household as "Cat" Carson instead of Jinx(kids-what're you gonna do?). What a great toy that cat is. I still have him.

But why would you want to draw him in Flash? I guess I'll find out soon enough! : )

Merry holidays Johnnie!

Michelle Klein-Hass said...

Congrats on the Winsor McKay award!

Dan Pinto said...

I just wanted to say congrats on the Annie Award. It's so cool that a guy is actually recognized not only for his work but for a blog like this that helps out us younger guys so much. Thanks.

carlo guillot said...

Hi John
I was reading your notes about storyboarding, but the last page was incomplete, I guess. It says "PLACE YOUR SCENE P".
Or maybe I just dont get it.
Thanks for your post, it keeps helping me a lot in my animations.

carlo guillot said...

CONGRAAAATTTTSSS for the Annie!
http://cartoongeeks.blogspot.com/

carlo guillot said...

CONGRAAAATTTTSSS for the Annie!!!
I've just read the Michele Klein-Hass comment, and find the news here:
http://cartoongeeks.blogspot.com/
ABOUT TIME!

JohnK said...

>>
I was reading your notes about storyboarding, but the last page was incomplete, I guess. It says "PLACE YOUR SCENE P".<<

Yeah Carlo, I noticed that.

I looked around for a complete version of that document and couldn't find one.

Sorry about that!

carlo guillot said...

No problem, John.
Your incomplete stuff is WAAAY more interesting that many 800 pages manuals.
:)

Cliff G. said...

Regarding your recent listing of donors, I just wanted to let you know CC Marketing is actually me, Cliff Galbraith. I should change my Paypal account to reflect that. But I wanted you to know I donated because you've really helped me with my understanding of this medium. I check your blog every few days and am constantly amazed at the depth of your understanding and rare ability to teach this very rich history and technique in small, easily digestible bites.

I'd like to make one observation if I may -- it's about perception. When I first saw the donate button, I saw it as digital panhandling. As I continued to read your blog on a regular basis, I felt very differently about contributing -- I came to greatly value the message and your commitment to passing on the techniques of the masters.

Many other readers may still have the same impression I once had about donations. Maybe it's the word "donation" that's the problem. I don't believe Radiohead is asking for a "donation" but rather for fans to pay what they think the material is worth. There may be something there you could use from Radiohead's model. A donation implies helplessness or neediness, a payment is for services rendered. You’ve done a service, and deserve payments, not handouts. PBS and NPR ask for a dollar a day or a dollar a week -- they break it down to saying it’s less than the cost of cable or a news paper or an overpriced cup of coffee. I believe an education in animation is worth far more than slurping down Starbucks.

Since reading your blog, I have joined ASIFA East, and taken steps to change my career to animation. I recently had my first article published in the ASIFA East newsletter.

Thank you for your effort. If you've ever wondered if anyone out here was paying attention, if it was worth all the trouble, if you've made a difference and shaped people's thinking, the answer is an emphatic YES!