Friday, March 07, 2008

Hep Cat FX

http://www.cartoonthrills.org/blog/Clampett/42HepCat/hepcatwireFXsmall.mov

Copy and paste the above url to see the animation. I can't get the direct link to work today for some reason...sorry


http://www.cartoonthrills.org/blog/Clampett/42HepCat/hepcatwireFXsmall.mov



Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting




http://www.cartoonthrills.org/blog/Clampett/42HepCat/hepcatwireFXsmall.mov


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


19 comments:

Raff said...

Nice. How did they make the brush strokes fade to transparent at the ends?

Bitter Animator said...

I'm curious about Raff's question too. I'm wondering how they got some of these so smooth given the methods that would have been available.

Ryan Cole said...

Looks like dry brush on cutouts were used to keep some form to the spinning, especially when the effect gets smaller. I absolutely love the instant no-nonsense cut to the tied up dog. No one frame to ease in to it, just spinning effects and he's there. It is giggle-worthy.

Lex said...

raff: It looks like a combination of dry brush and airbrush/frisket.

- Lex

The Butcher said...

I think the best part of this scene is when each of the characters arrives at the window before walking the string. They stop themselves short and it's like their bodies stretch and wobble forward. Something like that. Anyway, to me it's more like feeling the movement than actually seeing it. I've always loved Clampett's cartoons, but looking at it from an analytical perspective lets you see how amazing it is. The guy's like a god.

Whit said...

The 1940's Warners drybrush/inkers were very skilled.

Anthony P. Rizzo said...

Hooray for brush stroke motion blur! I think they used magic Raff. Just a hunch...

David Germain said...

The bottom link doesn't work either. Oh well, this cartoon is also on DVD. It's certainly one of Clampett's best.

lastangelman said...

Absolutely breathtakingly immaculately fantastic! I'm sorry there wasn't anymore Bob Clampett Hep Cat cartoons.

Booo Tooons Ltd. said...

No chance they used an airbrush, right? Wait, I don't know if they were invented then.

Hrm.

- trevor.

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

What beautiful colors! I'd love to see a good color print of this on a big screen!

Juan Pablo said...

I love the tension lines around the rope, when the dog is all tied up.

Their gradual fade-out, when the dog opens his eyes, works worderfully to add tension.

They are a force acting on the rope, keeping it immobile, and when they disappear, nothing is holding the rope anymore, and all tension is released!

Roberto said...

This is what happens when dry brush and great animation are combined together. It almost looks like smear animation. Incredible...

Squishy Sqiggles said...

I know that I'm probably supposed to be looking at the spinning effects, but I really like the buildings in the bg. Really good colors and so subtle. ah.

The Jerk said...

trevor- airbrush was invented in 1879, according to the never-wrong wikipedia. :-)

at any rate, whatever method used, the technique and talent behind these effects is gargantuan.

littlearse said...

check out the rest of the cartoon - its filled with tons of nice speedlines! i love that they're colored - as opposed to just black

cemenTIMental said...

Nice! They held a drybrush frame for a bit too long tho!? :)

Jorge Garrido said...

Nice, it looks like Clampett figured out how to adapt abtract expressionism to cartoons.

Mitch K said...

How do you even begin to draw that to be painted??