Tuesday, August 26, 2008

Some Disney Book Wrinkles

Ashanti sent me these examples of Disney book wrinkles. A bit more elaborate than what you would want to animate, but nice looking as illustrations.

16 comments:

Whit said...

That Daisy Indian princess bears a whiff of Eldon Dedini.

mongo said...

Super off topic, but do you still administor or look at your art school blog submissions? I'm going to start regardless, but was just curious. I'm sure your way to busy and I read the blog that people were not following the lessons all the way through. Thanks John.

Tony DiStefano said...

The girl in the water on the Pete setup looks like a Tom Oreb design.

The Butcher said...

Thanks!

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

Daisy and Goofy are well done but the wrinkles are pretty much where you'd expect them to be. Real wrinkles are always full of surprises.

Those surprises are an important part of comedy. It's the contradiction that comes about because the human is trying to pass himself off as suave but his wrinkled clothes make him look ignorant.

Caleb Bowen said...

With Disney stuff I have a hard time telling if the absurdity is intentional or not. A female duck (named Daisy) with eyelashes and long hair in the snow with an American Indian outfit. It's not funny or historic, but here ya go kids!

Comic said...

Off-topic: John are the Yogi Bear Sundays on ComiCrazys Gene Hazelton? They don't look so, but Hazelton had varied styles.

Gerard D. de Souza said...

I believe these illos are from an encyclopedia called Disney's Wonderful WOrld Of Knowledge. I believe it was originaly published and illustrated in Italy.

Bwanasonic said...

*Caleb Bowen said "With Disney stuff I have a hard time telling if the absurdity is intentional or not. A female duck (named Daisy) with eyelashes and long hair in the snow with an American Indian outfit. It's not funny or historic, but here ya go kids!"

That sums up a lot of my emotional response to Disney stuff. I just always get that "Wow, that's pretty effin' twisted! Do they not see how wrong that is?!" vibe from so much of the Disney universe. I once worked with a sweet and sincere young man who showed me a "Happy Easter" drawing of his that featured Jesus crucified, with bunnies and easter eggs at the base of the cross. This was a completely un-ironic and honest expression on his part. It's harder for me to give the Disney artists that same *Un-Ironic Primitive* pass when they feature disturbing *Daisy-as-Pocahontas* imagery.

Mr. Semaj said...

I believe these illos are from an encyclopedia called Disney's Wonderful WOrld Of Knowledge.

They are, because I remember having these books as a kid.

chet said...

Speaking of Disney... I was aware of some of their politically-charged efforts to protect their IP rights (specifically the mouse, which is a trademark and a copyright), but just read this yesterday.

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-mickey22-2008aug22,0,6883462.story?page=1

Gerard D. de Souza said...

Thanks, semaj. I've seen these encyclopedia in many a thrift store but I've dug out the only volume worth having, (don't have the shelf space) Vol. 20 the index. It had a cover that could be a Gottfredson and inside it talks a little about Disney animation and characters before the actual index, which is littered with illos. (The translation into English is hilariously too proper). The illustrator is credited as Giovan Battista Carpi but there has to be more illustrators and some American artists. I thought Carpi may've been the real name of Romano Scarpa, who drew alot of great Mickey books, but no. Ironically though according to wikipedia Carpi did work with Scarpa.
To those who don't like Mickey and Donald as animated characters you should read the comic book reprints by Barks, Gottfredson and European artists. Nothing like the animated shorts.

John Young said...

goofy looks great as a smoker.

Zoran Taylor said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
SoleilSmile said...

I just think they're beautiful. I learned to draw Disney characters as a kid from these books in the 70's. There were no art of's and no home video then, so Disney's Wonderful World of Knowledge became a great resource for me. I use to draw the Navajo Daisy over and over and over again.

Thanks for posting John ^_~

Tyler said...

Thanks for making my childhood great.