Monday, November 10, 2008

Good General Advice For All Cartoonists

This is a beautiful, seemingly loose drawing. Actually only the inking is loose. The drawing underneath is very solid and knowledgeable. The first thing a young cartoonist sees in a good cartoonist's work is the final details, the style, the inking - the last superficial layer. Those things are important, but only if the basic drawing skills are there in the first place. Style can't happen without substance and skill first.


These tips are from an old cartooning course and it explains all that very clearly.




DETAILS CAN'T HIDE A BAD DRAWING




http://comicrazys.wordpress.com/2008/11/01/famous-artists-cartoon-course-lesson-5-the-figure-in-detail/



http://comicrazys.wordpress.com/2008/11/06/that%e2%80%99s-my-pop-moon-mullins-4-1948-milt-gross/

15 comments:

Gajonauta said...

Thanks for enlightening us once again, John. I'll be sure to keep that advice in mind.

By the way, can you or any one else here give me a tip on how to animate a foot tapping? I'm trying to do a simple foot tapping animation for my homepage www.rafaelnazario.com, and I want to know if traditionally animators would move the whole leg, or just the foot. I know it's something simple, but it's good to pay attention to detail.

HemlockMan said...

I'll never forget that my father happened across the complete Famous Artist courses in one of his sojourns of book-buying for one of his many used bookstores. He brought them home for me--I think I was eight years old at the time. They were fun to look at, but I was too young to follow the courses. Eventually, the vast notebooks were lost along the way.

Deniseletter said...

This is valuable,Many thanks for the tips!

Mike Tucker said...

Another great old text book for us to study, John?

The part on hands comes at just the right time for me.
No matter what tricks I world do, my normal human hands always turned out like claws or arthritic patients. Or lifeless baseball mitts.

David Germain said...

Hey, gajonauta, just-a by accident I did some foot tapping animation in a scene for a TV show I'm working on now (which I redid and redid and redid again).

One thing to keep in mind is to rock the foot on the heel. When the foot goes up the heel is flat on the ground. And thusly when the foot comes back down the heel comes back up, not in the air but just not flat on the ground anymore. Also, the lower leg moves back when the foot goes up too.
But, when in doubt, watch your own foot tapping, see what it does.

I hope that helps.

Disposable Ninja said...

Damn, why did hands have to be so important.

trevor said...

Thanks John!

- trevor.

Christine Gerardi said...

Thanks John, that's really helpful!

Elana Pritchard said...

Listen to this man! Practice, practice, PRACTICE!!!

Joseff!!1 said...

Thanks for the info, the good books on cartooning are always the old ones. Great find!
JOHN! you should check my inking abilities
http://www.josephsketch.blogspot.com
Hope you like them.
Peace.

Grant said...

Im currently doing life drawing and I'm applying so many of these wee lessons to all my other work: Line of action and NO CHEATING.

So many lessons I've learned from John and applied it to other areas ouside cartooning, truly we all owe him! Thanks for another wonderful post John

mike f. said...

That first panel cartoon comes from an underrated newspaper strip called "The Neighbors" by George Clark. I first heard about Clark from Shane Glines, who featured his work on Cartoon Retro. (I think Shane owns some Clark originals, too.)

He's a great Golden Age draftsman to study, especially for staging and posing. I wish his work was more readily available.

Bob said...

Was this book done by Al Capp because I see lil' abner in some of the tutorials.... Anyways, great post I need to practice this stuff

Looney Moon Cartoons said...

The Famous Artists Cartoon Course is a great resource. Thanks for the heads up.

Niki said...

Mr. John If at all possible, I would like to know, is there some way to direct how your style looks after you learn the basics and practices? cause I've been trying every set on the ASIFA pages, and it isn't coming out the way I would like it to. It's a real downer.