Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Simple Ad Layouts That Feature The Product



I'm nostalgic for old time simple generic product ad layout. I love these ads because the layout is completely functional. It's designed to show off the product. The products themselves are so much fun to look at that they don't need fancy layouts to distract from them.

http://neatocoolville.blogspot.com/2008/07/1960s-hanna-barbera-tv-guide-ads.html


I love the generic typefaces in the instructional text. The headings are much bolder and tell you the main point - they draw you in to read the smaller text. Hierarchy of importance and control of function and purpose. Alien concepts today.

Man, wouldn't you kill for this Howdy Doody skullless floating facial parts mobile??! What a great idea. I'd love to do this with some of my characters. Or my friends.

All this stuff is handsomely and carefully arranged with logic.


I sent away for this very ad and ordered all these breakfast eating accessories. You can't imagine the thrill I got when the package actually arrived in the mail. From then on I refused to eat breakfast in anything but my Huckleberry Hound Bowl and Yogi Bear mug.

Package Art Layout

The covers of old cereal boxes had more design in the layouts. The whole image was designed to be bold and have a non-ambiguous shape that you could see all the way across the store.
Bold graphically expert fun images tell you that the product is very tasty.

Compare to today's layouts:

Chaos Theory Layout


a lot of modern layout has no layout at all. Look how much harder it is to tell what you are looking at in this cluttered thoughtless box art. This sends a message that the food will taste like landfill.

Who is it that forces every box artist to put that crappy airbrush dirt all over the characters on every product? Is there some sort of Airbrush God that won't allow any variety in rendering cartoon characters? This style has to be the absolute worst way to render cartoons - ever. And it's all there is anymore! It takes all the cartooniness out of the image and makes the characters hard to make out. Somebody pleeeease explain this to me.



There's another theory of modern layout that drives me crazy - "book design". Ever buy a book about some vintage art, cartoons or toys because you actually like those cartoons and toys only to find out that the book has been designed so you never get a full image of any of the things you bought the book for? Or the images of the most intricately detailed toys are really small, and a tiny simple image is blown up far beyond what you need? Or there are acres of blank white space around tiny images and then 4 tons of text explaining to you why you should love these images that you can barely see?

That's layout that purposely competes for attention with the subject of the book or product , which is considered very stylish these days. I don't have any examples handy, but I'm sure if you are a collector, you've had this same frustrating experience.

61 comments:

Zach Bellissimo said...

They don't make em like they used to...siiigh...

Louise Smythe said...

I struggle so much with page layout in my typography class at school. I seem to hit or miss every time. I think I have some design insecurities to conquer this semester. Also, I agree with you 100% about the airbrush on cartoon character thing. I am guilty of that every now and then and I know I prefer techniques evident in the older examples you have posted (and all those great Little Golden Books).

Aaron said...

Yeah. I think the airbrush stuff looks crappy as well, and everything is a gradienty, and when it's generic it's way extra bad and its the same picture on the back and the front.

craigp said...

P Owsley should draw and design everything involving characters for ads or packaging.
i sometimes deal with licensing at my current job and it's rare to be supplied with character artwork that isn't hideous and airbrushed(as if the companies that own these characters don't have any respect for them).
food products are the absolute worst these days for raping beloved characters and whoring them out to sell garbage. it's really depressing.

craigp said...

Louise - check out Chip Kidd- he's one of the greatest designer around these days and he loves classic cartoons/comics and it shows

Niki said...

Le Sigh... I often buy video game magazines, and when I'm trying to find out what the game looks like, I often find instead a smiling idiot holding the game saying to buy it but I don't even know what it looks like.

These are similar:

A commercial for Reebok shoes

This one is interesting. If you can't tell yes, she's advertising the drink. Also the ad was pulled because of her scarf...Or just idiocy

Kali Fontecchio said...

Mike and Eddie Mobiles!!!

EalaDubh said...

Oh my God, I couldn't ABIDE what they did to Snap, Crackle and Pop. Especially Pop, he used to be the coolest one with that toy-soldier outfit of his. But then they went through their (ugh) 1980s superhero phase, and as if that wasn't bad enough, suddenly Pop was the bumbling comic relief. They made him a complete arsehole! And he's been stuck with the slapstick stooge role ever since. The BASTARDS.

EalaDubh said...

Allow me to first the first salvo at real bad book design, by nominating art spiegelman's volume on the life and works of Jack 'Plastic Man' Cole. It's a great, informative and visually arresting book, right up to the point where the author/editor stops pretending it's about Cole's suicide and it starts being about spiegelman himself (like his books tend to do). After showcasing some lovely 1940s Plastic Man pages and collaborations with Will Eisner (though not nearly enough), spiegelman insists in showing off his own look-at-me-my-name's-all-lower-case artsy-fartsy credentials, using Cole's own artwork and photos in cut-out collage form to turn the rest of the book into a one great big graphic representation of Cole's neuroses. For page after page after page. It's CRIMINAL.

Jim said...

I wonder what popularized this airbrush look for cartoons. The earliest example I can think of was "Who Framed Roger Rabbit". I remember not liking the smudgy shading technique so much.

But that's a good question... Why is it that ad cartoons went that direction? It seems to me that there's this nonsensical trend toward realism, and we're supposed to see it as some kind of impressive technological improvement. Same thing with these CG animated movies. We don't want to see cartoon characters with nasty pores in their skin, and super detailed hair. We don't need to be fooled into believing that there's anything remotely realistic in a damn cartoon. The whole concept is like a lie.

Kris said...

Funny thing is, even as an adult, if I saw those well-designed old boxes (especially the SUGAR JETS--that looks FANTASTIC), I would want to buy them even if I'd never heard of the product before and didn't know what it was.

A simple, bold design like that would easily stand out among the modern box designs. Cereal companies would be smart to try something like that.

Lohenhart said...

Is amazing. In my Arts school, the first time they show us to "colouring" was using that shadow-brush technique. What the hell its happening??

Lluis Fuzzhound said...

Yeah I once got interviewed in some magazine, and the designer didn't spare one whole image from his godly creativity!!, It was useless, you couldn't see anything... don't know why they do that!!
It's like musicians today too... they want to just show off all they know, way back when they knew when to shut up! that was style!

Ebbe said...

Don't blame those books on the designers. There's a 99% chance its the editors' and authors' fault. There's nothing we can do if we get a wall of text and nowhere to put it, and the people in charge won't budge.

Rated-R said...

I think the airbrushing makes the characters look as plastic and fake as those food-byproducts that come inside. It also has a cheap 3D effect that makes these characters fit into modern 3D anti-mation. They do do focus groups for cereal boxes, right? Unfortunately all the boxes they use are probably similarly designed. It would be interesting to do a focus group and use an old style, (but new looking) box VS a box that is made up of trends. Any takers?

Rated-R said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Khaki Hat said...

Web designers suffer from a similar problem, but they have instant feedback that covers not only hits but length of stay and browsing habits. This information tends to wow the suits who at lest now understand their micromanaging ways cant hack some design training.

The Suit therefore acts differently in the cartoon studio. Because there are few spreadsheet templates that will show the difference between pro cartoonists and amateurs, he continues his micromanagement.

Sadly it seems that few production artists are trained as web designers to hold hierarchy high in their design arsenal. They just seem to draw fruit; that's what my art class ended up doing.

Joseph Luster said...

I don't know when the whole airbrush thing started, but it seems at some point someone thought it looked "better" and "more detailed" and it trickled down from there.

Dave Jacob Hoffman said...

I love the generic typefaces in the instructional text. The headings are much bolder and tell you the main point - they draw you in to read the smaller text. Hierarchy of importance and control of function and purpose. Alien concepts today.

I have to disagree with you that this concept is "alien" in graphic design. In fact, this concept of a hierarchy is a basic principle in design that you can find examples of pretty much anywhere.

So I can't agree with most of your opinions on these designs, but you are spot-on with the cereal boxes. Those things are dreadful, and they used to be so great.

Kuzey said...

Hi John. This site might interest you. It has ads from the past, I really love the B&W tv ads of the 50's.

http://theimaginaryworld.com/page4.html

M. R Darbyshire said...

What about magazine covers? How long has it been okay to cover up part of, or sometimes the entire, name of the magazine?

JohnnyS said...

I feel you 100 percent on this one. Have you seen what they've done to Count Chocula? It's an abomination!
http://www.candypirate.com/ekmps/shops/candypirate/images/count_chocula.jpg

Zoran Taylor said...

I have a feeling that Meadow Gold girl found her way into a few Log commercials and at least one for Powdered Toast....also, that Hody Doody face cycle thingy is ultra creepy. And I love it.

dave-o said...

I have Chip Kidd's 'Batman Animated' book which is now out of print. I read your frustration with his book design filled with 'dramatic' photos of toys, things cropped beyond recognition, etc. I know the Batman animation style makes you cringe and barf, but I'm a fan of it --but the book is not for fans! Its for some other being out there who digs creepy photos and graphic design. I guess publishers think that kind of thing sells. Maybe it does! It certainly has made Chip Kidd famous.

Draconis said...

It's not just the airbrush look, it's the *photoshop* airbrush look which makes it look so damned generic! As far as that "style" you mention, I think it originated from trying to emulate the traditionally airbrushed Disney posters and videotape covers. Unfortunately, even the new Disney covers suffers from techniques garnered from furry art (low saturation, pillow shading, bad lighting, etc.).

Regarding layout, it would behoove anyone to pick up a copy of the non-designers design book (and typography book). Robin Williams addresses everything you talked about in this article.

Peggy said...

the "book designer"

oh god yes I hate this shit. I was so pissed when I bought this one book of Plastic Man reprints; it wasted enough space for two more stories with someone doing "designer" wank all over a few panels. HEY LET'S ZOOM IN AND CROP IT TIGHT FIVE TIMES ON ONE PAGE! I'M ANDY WARHOL! CHECK IT OUT, HALFTONING BLOWN UP TO 1000%!

And this "designer" got his name on the front cover, too, IIRC.

Iritscen said...

Ha ha, I had to laugh at your final comments on collectors' books; I don't exactly buy collectors' books, but I do own a couple books about the history (and merchandise) of the Batman and Superman properties, and the books have that exact kind of layout. Look at the Batman book's cover. Yes, really, that's the cover. They blew up the first cover appearance of Batman until it makes you want to gauge your eyes out. Nice job. They did the same thing for Superman's and Wonder Woman's books.

Here's a review that hits the nail on the head.

Thanks for mentioning this, John, I never noticed consciously how much it bothers me.

Adam T said...

They use too many contrasting colors and photographs on food packaging. It's physically painful to actually scan the aisle at the supermarket to find what I want. It's sensory overload. I sometimes leave with a headache.

One more thing... what idiot names a cereal Muslix or Vector? Those are good names for a dog in a sci-fi novel but not cereal!

Dan Jackson said...

I'm pretty sure that a lot of the airbrushed cartoon characters started with "Who Framed Roger Rabbit". Remember how after that movie was a hit all the cartoon ads were trying to copy it's style, and that included the whole "airbrushed shaded" look. Now, I do dig the movie, but I'll admit that it sort of spawn this generic shaded look we all know today, which has been made an epidemic by Photoshop.

Now they don't even know what they're copying anymore. I'll confess I'm guilty of doing this airbrush shading stuff too, because either clients ask for it, or they assume it's higher quality if it's shaded. I don't know why that is.

Caleb said...

The brown airbrush is from a tanning salon. Everyone must have a healthy coat of hot brown or something is clearly wrong with them.

Matt J said...

I wonder which cereal boxes first used the airbrushing? Do you think it harks back to the tones & rims in ROGER RABBIT?

Trevor Thompson said...

Somebody pleeeease explain this to me.


I can't explain it, but as a child of the 80's, I do recall that after 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit' came out, the airbrushed look was a mainstay with animated cereal commercials.

For a while, they would only do it if there was a significant amount of live action ( 8 year olds from the William Morris Agency acting poorly ) or photo-real backgrounds, but come mid-90's they ALL had that look.

I guess you can blame Richard Williams again, but I blame Spielberg and that hack George Lucas.

By the way, this post couldn't have come at a better time for me. I have to design a cereal box for a fictional product and design it in the 50's style, so it's a great help.

Thanks John!

- trevor.

pappy d said...

You can track the focus group by its scat. Those new cereal boxes seem to be obsessed with texture. I suspect that the texture of a breakfast cereal was something that came up a lot in market testing.

"Muslix" & "Vector" aren't even names for cereal. Vector is about dynamism. I'm the type of guy who runs in the morning, whether I actually run or not. I'm driven. The shortest distance to the top is a straight line so stay out of my way. Muslix (with a freaking umlaut!) binds the counterculture with tradition. I'm Heidi's libertarian hippie grandfather. I'm at one with the good earth. I'm calm & self-reliant. I have confidence that I'm perfectly capable of making my own Muslix, rolling the oats by hand between two enormous smooth stones. I take off my shoes before climbing the almond tree for nuts.

dave-o said...

Roger Rabbit was a paradigm shift for the animation industry, and chief among these was character shading, obviously. They used a highly complicated pre-digital optical printer at ILM to render the shades and shadows. The creators were very conscious of not going too overboard with it and avoided a "look" like this...
Carl Barks Oil Painting. The Roger Rabbit look works because in the context of the film, 2-D characters are made to be in a 3-D space.

Unfortunately, one generation's vanguard is another's miscue. Now, every bit of character-based advertising has that cheesy Carl Barks oil painting look, but worse because it's made with passing over a few filters and tools in Photoshop. Art directors know the tools and when they need to see something fast, this is what they get. Rather than point fingers, what's needed is a sort of creative cease and desist order against ever rendering anything this ugly again!

Bob Flynn said...

A child of the 80s, I'm having a hard time remembering cereal commercials that didn't use the airbrush technique. Your average consumer definitely prefers it...most people equate something that looks more real as looking better. The same thing has happened with logos---its a trend in almost all popular graphic media, where eyecandy is everywhere. And design is focus-grouped and controlled by marketers.

Plus, we've grown more accustomed to seeing cartoon characters rendered in 3D. Flat is bad, real is better. And its so easy add all these effects with computer software.

Stone said...

I just got a copy of Erich Sokol's "American Natives" (out of print) and it's gotta be the BEST "art of anyone" book I've ever seen. The layout is just one illustration per page that fills the whole page and the opposing page is left blank so your attention is focused solely on that one piece. and NO text anywhere save for the very beginning where there's a small forward by steve allen. It gave me exactly what I wanted. the art!

Williaint said...

It's a faux 3D look! It's like they can't decide whether they want it to look realistic or not.

Michael DiMilo said...

My theory on why the designs of collector books are out of whack is that they're laid out by intern designers who don't care much for the collections. Instead of trying to get the images to be as big as possible they treat it like a catalog. Lets just see how much we can cram in.

One book that doesn't do this is Meet Mr. Product. A friend of mine gave this to me a while back and it's just so much fun. It's chock full of classic product characters, all rendered in a range of media and styles. Too bad the book itself is kind of small. There is no doubt that a fun character rendered in gouache, cut paper, anything but that that hideous, gloopy, overwrought airbrush style would fly off the shelf in the cereal aisle.

http://www.amazon.com/Meet-Mr-Product-Advertising-Character/dp/0811835898

Thanks for another provocative post, John.

ii said...

I'd pass right by those old ones. They are instant reads. The new ones I have to stop and try to figure what the heck they are selling. I might even pick up the box to have a closer look. Before I know it, it's in my cart.

Rick Roberts said...

Hey ! I like Carl Barks' oil paintings !

Ian M said...

I am under the impression that they have to do that airbrushing stuff because of "Who Framed Roger Rabbit." I heard after that movie became a huge hit that the executives started asking for it on everything.

patrick said...

I would buy an Eddie mobile!

C. A. M. Thompson said...

I have that Plastic Man book too. I love collage and stuff like that but when these art books get too designy it kinda distracts. At least Siegelman didn't completely kill the book.

I think the airbrushy artwork started with Disney VHS covers in the 80's and everybody just blindly follows Disney.

Luke said...

Blame Chip Kidd:

http://goodisdead.com/images/work/kidd_batmangahardcover.jpg

http://goodisdead.com/images/work/polito_savageart.jpg

http://www.tucsonweekly.com/binary/44966-273-1/book-7432.jpeg

Jonathan Harris said...

Oh my God John I actually can't believe you did a post about cereal boxes!! This shit seriously leaves me foaming at the mouth sometimes! I never knew old cereal boxes looked that good! I wish I could've been a kid when stuff like that was in vogue!

Waldo_Wigglesworth said...

Being The Benefit of Mr. K,

A topic of interest that might intrigue you:

http://www.cracked.com/article_16959_5-classic-cartoons-they-dont-want-you-see.html

Shalom,
- Waldo Wigglesworth

Tanya said...

You're completely right. Now I know why I have so much trouble down the cereal aisle. XD I could tell the concept of layout was going downhill, but I could never put my finger on how...this really explains a lot. It's kind of sad.

Wendell said...

There's also an overboard backlash to the inflated, shadowed, metallic, over-rendered, over-cluttered style we're discussing here: the new minimalism. Check out Pepsico's redesign of Pepsi and Tropicana brands. Just google Pepsi branding. Almost generic looking. It's certainly cleaner, but it has that modern antiseptic sterile web feel, unlike John K's old examples that are simple yet have warmth. I'm amazed at the design crowd that defends this unemotional and neutral school of design.

It's "hip" to be spare.

Wendell said...

This isn't cereal yet but I see it creeping in different supermarket products:

Pepsico re-design:

http://www.brandcurve.com/tropicana-goes-generic-with-new-packaging/

http://www.underconsideration.com/brandnew/archives/pepsi_new_bottles.php

(scroll down to see older designs and blogger design suggestions)

Hans Flagon said...

Ha!

I eat those Strawberry Rice Krispies, and cringe everytime I look at the box, thinking "John K would have a field day with this train wreck"

And it turns around that you do so without any prompting.

Gratuitous airbrushing of non realistic shading onto formless non constructed flat designed bastardizations of Snap Crackle and Pop is enough to make you lose your lunch.

I'm not that keen on freeze dried astronaut strawberries, but I like this version of Rice Krispies the cereal because it is one of the few sweetened cereals they do not overdo the sugar on. If I were going with frosted flakes, I would buy the reduced sugar Frosted Flakes and still mix it down half and half again with unsweetened frosted flakes.

Hans Flagon said...

Taschen art books are usually very good about not going all Lichenstein Post modern on the presentation of Toys and comics. They usually just offer well photographed examples of hard to find toys and such.

www.taschen.com

As opposed to badly photographed versions you might see in an antiques price guide, with clashing color backgrounds.

Chip Kidd is a success because he does that post mordernism blow up abstract the mechanics of the process taken from the cartoon world. By doing so, he does keep those images in some sort of exposure, in a world that would reject such as childish trash. It actually sort of supports that notion that it might be worthless as well. But I'm not going to knock Chip Kidd for doing that, I think he loves the source material as much as he loves making a living printing 500% halftones of the stuff and sticking it on some hacks bestselling novel.
That latest Bat Manga Book of his would be hard to read by most English speakers anyway, so he is presenting the book in a way that at least make the publishers seem less guilty that they are not simply reprinting the stuff wholesale as is. (Japanese Batmanga is almost more like Goulds Dick Tracy than it is like Manga of the past 40 years, its like finding a Fred Flintstone image or doll where the sabertooth skin suit is green rather than orange.

Flat and designy isn't inherently bad, those good cereal boxes show that. But watch a fleisher Popeye still frame, sort of a flat design, then watch it MOVE and the movement provides all sorts of real 3-d cues of solid construction.

The insane grins of snap crackle and pop, a subset of the 'tude disease, for me seemed to start when fan artists started drawing for fanzines, and they thought that a big smile was the default expression. Bugs Bunny's smile meant something, because, although he smiled much of the time, he also had other emotions.

Bill said...

I don't see whats so bad about the shading but it is pointless for the most part. I used to do it using a pencil as I hardly using draw on my computer and I kinda dug it, I then used it in Photoshop just for a little more detail. I think that its just for the sake of unneccesary sophistcation and showing off, both the ads for cereal and their boxes are much alike nowadays but I still think that our animated movies are whats really suffering. On a side note, whats the point in Chipps Bat manga? We already have a Star Wars and Star Trek manga, how does seeing classic characters drawn with big pupils and toothless mouths make a story any better? Yeesh just because Hollywoods making alot of re-makes and parodies dosen't mean that we have to. If the guys in suites tell me to be modern or whatever I'll just go freelance, there are piles of dirt that stoop to trend trash and then theres statues like me. Oh, John, ever notice that in the 50's and now when cartoons got full of corners that our cars did too? Nowadays nearly every car has angular vicious eyes like anime characters.

craigp said...

Bill-
the Batmanga book isn't new work, it's from the 60s when the Batcraze was at it's height. what's interesting is that this isn't an exact translation of the american form into the japanese style, it's new stories (where the the Star Wars manga is simply the movies in a manga style). the batmanga stories are fun and crazy and sometimes inexplicable. it's just neat to see how another culture reinterprets and adapts something to make it their own.

it's also important because it may be the first and only time a major american comics publisher allowed their property to be licensed out to another country and remodeled without a tight grip.

craigp said...

Peggy wrote:
"oh god yes I hate this shit. I was so pissed when I bought this one book of Plastic Man reprints; it wasted enough space for two more stories with someone doing "designer" wank all over a few panels. HEY LET'S ZOOM IN AND CROP IT TIGHT FIVE TIMES ON ONE PAGE! I'M ANDY WARHOL! CHECK IT OUT, HALFTONING BLOWN UP TO 1000%!"


i thought this book was brilliant, after all the DC Archive editions of Plasticman have been out for quite some time, so if you want straight story reprints in order you got them already, but instead was a great mixture of Jack Cole biography, many stories, non-plasticman comics/art, and a sampling of Plastic man products.

Quite a unique and insightful look into and an often overlooked genius of cartooning hitory.

(i promise i won't post off topic anymore here! sorry john!)

Jason M. said...

One of my assignments in Graphic Design school was to design a cereal box. I was so excited! I spent hours studying old cereal box covers just to understand the simple bold designs. When I finally came up with a design of my own using what I had learned, my teacher explained the error of my ways. He said there wasn't enough to my design, it was too simple. It need more to it like newer cereal boxes have. He showed me the airbrush technique used on the Flinstones that gave the characters a "3-d quality." He then showed me what exciting bevels and outlining you can add to the fonts that give them a "dynamic feel." My colors, he said, were too muted. In order to "make the box stand out on the shelf" it must only use every clashing bright primary and secondary color there is. That way you can never miss it. All colors must have a gradient pattern so that your eye cannot rest on any open space. Finally you must have a "sense of attention to detail" by filling the ENTIRE drawings with useless details.

pappy d said...

Mercantile culture.

dave-o said...

Here's a very good article about the "Roger Rabbit" effect, albeit about the effect on live-action but A.O. Scott lays out an interesting extended metaphor for Toontown. Basically, the fake Toon world has extended into all-out fakery in movies such as Sin City which are shot entirely on green screen. This kind of animation and live-action have blended to give us a new hybrid. Everything from "Wall-E" to "Benjamin Button" subscribes to this theory. Flatness is dead in this world except in title sequences. No wonder its not tolerated, even on cereal boxes!

Hans Flagon said...

Maybe the idea behind the over detailed unreadable package design is to get the consumer to pick it up to study it, (WTF is THAT crap?) and it is one step closer to being in the cart.

Geez what have they done to coca cola this time? Oh well, I'm running out might as well take some....

Steven said...

A very intersting post, John.

I used to have cartoon mugs, which I used all the time. Using it to paint one day, and drinking hot chocolate out of it the next. One of these mugs pictured the TMNT. There were two blue Turtles and two red Turtles, simply because this was probably cheaper to produce. I loved it nonetheless, if not more.

Today, my mother gave me a mug she got at the supermarket of Mickey Mouse. Unfortunately, full-color mugs are just as cheap to produce nowadays. It's airbrushed and I don't like it, so I thought I should share the "design" with you.

http://img73.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1010092ai7.jpg

Chris said...

There is good packaging design (the dieline is a good blog for those who are interested) – but American cereal boxes are certainly not good examples of it :p

Much of it can probably be blamed on add-more-and-make-everything-bigger boardroom-compromise-design. Some of it may just be poor headhunting, giving big design jobs to bad designers who've made the right friends.

Conor said...

I don't think the Rice Crispies puppet advertisement or the Dennis The Menace advertisement is in any way better from a layout point of view than current advertisements. I would say that they are worse. Cluttered.

Chip Kidd is a great book designer, and I'm a big fan of his cropping techniques. Really exciting stuff.

The layout for Sugar Jets and Sugar Smacks are not too dissimilar to modern cereal boxes in layout, only in image and typographic treatment. I think the characterization on the Fruity Pebbles box is just as exciting and dynamic as the packaging from the 40s and 50s.

A good book for vintage packaging is Krazy Kids Food by Taschen. Loads of great stuff in there.