Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Kick Bug



Usually in animation I am fighting to get people to nor tone down what the previous artist did or them. Layout artists tone down the storyboards Animators tone down the layouts. Assistants tone down the animation until the images on the screen have no life to them.
I never had to worry about this with Kelly Armstrong's animation. I wish I had the layouts to show you, but she actually took the poses much farther.
Usually when I send my poses to another land - even Canada, the animators don't believe the drawings and "fix" them for me by taking out the line of action, specific expressions and exaggeration.



















http://www.cartoonthrills.org/blog/spumco/RenStimpy/1BHB/KellyKickBug.mov

27 comments:

Isaac said...

How could I miss George and Fred in the background up till now?

Jay_fever said...

Great stuff once again...Man I swear if it's not one thing it's another...referring to creating art for a large company. I'm happy that you all were able to keep a lot of that expression. It was one of my favorite things to watch when I viewed the show.

Zoran Taylor said...

Ren's feet have suctions on them! Nice...

Rick Roberts said...

I can't believe I never, EVER, noticed the charicatures of George Jetson and Fred Flinstone ! I also love that little smirk Ren has.

nktoons said...

beautiful drawings.......

Shawn Dickinson said...

That Huckleberry Hound Baboon in the background is hilarious. I think this is the first time I ever noticed his big rubbery ischial callosity.

Ryan G. said...

Crazy! I dont think I realized this bug kick before..or Fred in the BG..Awesome!

J C Roberts said...

I'm surprised how many people seemed to have missed the HB cameos, I'm pretty sure I picked up on all three the first broadcast.

I'm curious how different the production was on this episode compared to the series. It always had a slightly different feel. Or was it mostly the difference of not having network notes when making a pilot?

Michael said...

It's strange, I've always noticed Fred and George.

patrick said...

Did Kelly also animate Stimpy going "yeah, yeah, yeah!" in that scene? That was done so beautifully!

:: smo :: said...

tons of awesome stuff here! the crazy animation kicks ass, but then the subtle stuff at the end where the girl is watching stimpy fly overhead is really impressive too!

it hearkens back to clampett stuff, where scribner would go nuts and then mckimson would follow up for balance. amazing.

rodineisilveira said...

If Joseph Barbera was alive to see this background, which includes the Fred Flintstone's and George Jetson's canine versions and the baboon-morphed Huckleberry Hound...

sean said...

gorgeous poses. I would have LOVED to inbetween this bad boy. Action, posing, push push push. Tons of fun.

I'm getting a little more than tired of cookie cutter flash animation for this reason. Usually animators have a limited amount of "pieces" to marionette around the screen instead of really pushing and ACTING.

The only part I thought could have been pushed quite a bit further was the actual kick. Blink and you miss it. But this is truly inspirational. Art meets entertainment. Thanks for sharing

Roberto González said...

I did notice the Fred and George thing in the background, but I never notice the kicking of the bug! I mean, I sort of noticed Ren kicked something but I never really noticed there was a bug there all the time...and I've watched this cartoon at least seven times if not more!

Fantastic poses in this particular scene, very, very cartoony.

Mitch K said...

Awesome poses! Fantastic animation! I never realized how noodly her arms get.

Mitch K said...

@Sean I would have LOVED to inbetween this bad boy.

If you watch it frame-by-frame, you'll notice that there's a heck of a lot more going on than just straight inbetweening. There's a lot of interesting and thoughtful breakdowns creating the fun movement between the poses, as well as getting the most out of the poses. There's probably a few new keys in there too, to get the animation to work nicely. It's a combination of both the lovely layouts and the thoughtful and creative animation.

Also Sean, I totally agree with you about Flash animation. It's terribly restricting trying to move pieces around all of the time, or even trying to draw new pieces -- everything is separate and nothing is together!

Whitney Pollett said...

This squash and stretch is out of control!! I love how ridiculously exaggerated everything is. Even the color pallet is extreme.
Will you ever be making new Ren and Stimpy's?

Pat Desilets said...

Frankly I hadn't realized until now how much good stuff was crammed in that scene.

I especially like the girl's poses.
The squint+"ok" is awesome.
And the part where she stops walking as ren anticipates "STOP" is just brilliant. I wish I had a poster of that frame


I'm hoping we'll get to see some layouts from that.

J C Roberts said...

"It's terribly restricting trying to move pieces around all of the time, or even trying to draw new pieces -- everything is separate and nothing is together!"


How restricting is 30 individual frames per second? Flash is only as restricting as the person using it is lazy. I was one of them when I first used Flash, and it showed. Now I'm going back and dumping the Flash tricks and keyframing it more. Perhaps underpowered computers can't handle it, but you can animate fully (if you can get past the chunky drawing tools. I will admit you have to work a little harder sometimes to wrangle a clean line, though.

Nothing is together? Tell that to the guy chasing the cell with Barney Rubble's missing ear on it that must have been swept up by the wind. It's more together than stacks of paper and celluose on pegs. If you want to draw everything on to a single layer and have a new drawing on each frame, Flash still has you covered.
Just because everyone uses it that way doesn't make it a limitation of the software, just the person using it.

I wouldn't suggest you try to do Disney animation with it (well, I wouldn't suggest you try to do Disney animation at all, we got enough of that...), but I find Flash very usable for the HB methods and John's refined methods for planned animation.

sean said...

Mitch... I was in no way putting down the existing animation. I'm just saying that it would have been tons of fun to take these poses and and go to town with them. Learn. Experiment. I think I might have done some things a little differently but I do love what's there.

Just to clarify.

J C Roberts said...

I didn't mean to sound like I was picking a fight there, I get defensive with Flash nowadays because I'm trying to take it further than it's reputation.

I've got a kind of reverse-John Henry thing going here, trying to prove the machine can keep up with the old fashioned hand made product. Mainly because I can't afford to do it that way (but I have painted some cells in my day).

Mr. Semaj said...

I always thought it was funny how Ren had to kick a ladybug instead of what probably would've been a can.

Mark said...

I could easily break out of that cage. The bars are rather far apart.

Pokey said...

Isn't that Elmyra from Tiny Toons..?:)

[Just kidding.]


Excellent pictures...from the first R&S short "Big House Blues", and it's the one with scenes excerpted in the Ren & Stimpy opening titles.

Pokey

smbhax said...

I'm not a great fan of Flash's UI, but the format itself is very flexible. For instance, I draw in Photoshop, animate the drawings in a GIF animation program, and have Flash display the result along with voices and music. I know that's a kooky workflow, but my point is that Flash can handle even something as weird as that, if you spend some time figuring out how to do it.

infinitysend said...

OH my god... George, Fred, AND Huckleberry hound.... man! I'm going to go back and watch my Season 1 and 2 DVD's again...

sexy projects said...

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Can I ask your impressiosions about an animation I made?
here is it:

http://vimeo.com/9042235