Tuesday, August 04, 2009

Squirt Animation

Jones may have introduced "Smear Animation", but Clampett brought us "Squirt Animation"














35 comments:

Niki said...

l gross watching that!

mike f. said...

My favorite scene, in my favorite cartoon, by my favorite animator, with my favorite character, at my favorite studio, by my favorite director.
Ever.

J C Roberts said...

As kids my brothers and I referred to this as Daffy turning into mercury. It always impressed us how he pulled that off.

Here's a little quiz: How many "Rubberheads" fall out the door as all the villains drop?

David Gale said...

That scene is insanely brilliant! Thanks for posting!

Rne said...

I have always seen the action in this scene as totally natural. When I was a kid an as an adult. But when I listened to the commentary of John´s in the Golden Collection it dawned on me how insane this scene truly was. It is one of my favorite shorts ever, no doubt about it. I loved it when I was a child and watched it in spanish (I´m from Argentina) and now when I watch it on its original version on DVD. (By the way, the old spanish voices were REALLY good. The new dubbing STINKS)

Zack said...

This is too pretty

Pedro Vargas said...

Genius! That's all I can say.

Kali Fontecchio said...

Weirdest/greatest thing of all time!

Shawn Dickinson said...

>>My favorite scene, in my favorite cartoon, by my favorite animator, with my favorite character, at my favorite studio, by my favorite director.
Ever.<<


Ditto!!!

Jonathan Harris said...

Where does the gun come from!?

Rick Roberts said...

There is just too much to choose from in Great Piggy Bank Robbery. Daffy just reading a comic book is hilarous.

mike f. said...

R. Crumb recently wrote (in the liner notes of a CD compilation of Hal Roach film music) that his lifelong obsession with collecting Jazz recordings could be traced to one childhood source:

He realized as an adult that his early years spent watching Laurel & Hardy and Little Rascals comedies on TV - with their jazzy, Depression era soundtracks by LeRoy Shields and Marvin Hatley - forever impacted his life, his tastes, his career, his choice of friends, etc...

I can relate. I was aware of The Great Piggy Bank Robbery since at least the age of five. It's been my favorite cartoon for more than forty years! For better or worse, it's influenced me in many ways.

One of which was a lifelong interest in Fearless Fosdick and Dick Tracy, which led to an overall obsession with classic comic strips, illustrations and cartoons in general, and ultimately a fascination with Golden Age film, music, TV and literature.

What a shame Golden Age classics aren't even on TV or in newspapers anymore, and have become increasingly obscure and inaccessible to the average American kid - who's too busy watching modern flavor-of-the-month product like Hanna Montana and G-Force to notice, or care.

No wonder SAT scores have nosedived into the earth's core.

Mateo said...

So that was my lucky time to post a comment in the same moment when had to write a new post Mr. John... :)

So I would like to ask you again, if You could give me same critique about my cartoons I just started to do this stuff looking at the rules of cartooning, 'cos for real I never been doing it...
So here is a links to my new exercices and last, that I tried to show You Mr K.

http://sickteo.blogspot.com/2009/08/next-cartoon-studies-stuff.html

http://sickteo.blogspot.com/2009/07/cartoon-studies-and-other-sketches.html

I would really appreciate your help, 'cos I really need to improve. :)

I'm sad that in Poland they never showed so many cartoons from Warner Bros, I think it's only because of that Cartoon Network in Poland was little late and in house of my parents it came in 1998...

Charles H. said...

I always cracked up every time I saw Daffy oozing from between the gangsters' nooks and crannies. That and the "I'm gonna rub you out!" scene. Utterly nuts... yet it looks perfectly normal.

By the way, I'm a fist time commenter, but long time reader. The place sure is a fine source of inspiration (plus notes on how to use it)!

P.S.
I recently posted a few studies on my blog, think you could give a few critiques (or tear them apart if necessary)? http://20thcenturyschmuck.blogspot.com/2009/08/sit-on-that-egg.html

Amir Avni said...

Who else would think of dissembling the character and have it crawl out piece by piece? Genius!

Martin Juneau said...

"I have always seen the action in this scene as totally natural. When I was a kid an as an adult. But when I listened to the commentary of John´s in the Golden Collection it dawned on me how insane this scene truly was. It is one of my favorite shorts ever, no doubt about it. I loved it when I was a child and watched it in spanish (I´m from Argentina) and now when I watch it on its original version on DVD. (By the way, the old spanish voices were REALLY good. The new dubbing STINKS)"

I agree with you about the dubbing cast. I lived in Quebec when we talked french and we're lived with the good dubbing cartoons in french from the Warner Bros. (Mostly the post-1948's) and i really use to love it, but since a thousand years and since the Space Jam craze, they changed the cast for a much commercial and freakin' french dubbing. Now the characters in french are much atrocious than in the first version. No surprises why many peoples like me want to watch at the original version. Because the new French voices stinks!

Taco Wiz said...

That was one of the funniest scenes in The Great Piggy Bank Robbery.

On an unrelated note, I'll give you thirty bucks for a caricature of me. If you accept, I'll send a link to a picture of me.

Rick Roberts said...

Mike F.:

I can relate as well. I credit my love of golden age cartoons to expand my taste in music and movies.

Also I must say that at least TCM still shows great films. My DVR is filled with movies starring James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, Robert Ryan, Cary Grant, and the list goes on. As a matter of fact today I watched a Harold Lloyd film for the first time.

ByTito said...

rne, the voices in spanish are great! may be more than english ones.

The animation on this scene is awesomeable!

mike f. said...

Yeah, Rick - TCM has been playing Lloyd classics all day long. (Why Worry? is his funniest IMO, followed by The Kid Brother and Safety Last.)

If I didn't have 'em on DVD already, I'd have stayed home to TIVO them all. You can't go wrong...

mike f. said...

I agree with ByTito. Rod Scribner is awesomeable, indeed!

JohnK said...

I don't think this scene is Rod Scribner, but it sure is funny.

Ted said...

I don't have an example at hand, but it seems like some of the silents (Felix comes to mind) were doing that.

Kali Fontecchio said...

"I don't think this scene is Rod Scribner, but it sure is funny."

Who is it then?

Pilsner Panther said...

Bob Clampett was the Salvador Dali of cartoon animation. In a way, Dali was less extreme, because his stuff didn't move!

The Laziest Sloth said...

one of the best cartoon ever!

Peter said...

Even the partial exposures as Daffy shoots off his gun is INNOVATIVE!

Mattieshoe said...

I just love the contrast of the extremely solid pose that Daffy takes after reforming

J C Roberts said...

Wait a minute, I was just looking at those last two grabs. Were those ghost images part of the original frames or are they a result of a 24 to 30 frame conversion. You could easily do that now for a jittery look, but I don't know if they would've done it in the 40s. It seems as if it would be too much trouble to be worth doing back then.

I'm leaning towards conversion artifact.

Peter said...

the "ghost images" look intentional. They don't appear on Daffy's gun fire effects, only on his body and hat.
They look like intentional partial exposures of every second cel to me.
It's true partial exposures (double run camera effects) were not common in this era so it's interesting they would try this effect.
It's a really clever way to get the shake effects without dry brush effects!

Rick Roberts said...

Mike F.:

Lloyd was not only a genius at comedy but also tragedy. My heart broke in The Graduate when he thought that he was just a clown for others to make fun of. :(

Rick Roberts said...

ARGH ! I meant The Freshman !

Pilsner Panther said...

Daffy's double exposures... well, how could that effect have been done in the 1940's?

Three ways that I can think of:

1. Rinse half the paint off the back of the cels and run them through the camera again (impossible).

2. Expose the finished cels twice, a bit out of register the second time, and at about a third-aperture lens opening (more possible).

3. Have two animators draw the same scene with slightly different poses, and then superimpose one over the other using that same small-aperture camera setting (very possible).

It seems more likely that it's an accident, but then nothing in "The Great Piggy Bank Robbery" appears to be an accident. What I think Clampett learned from Tex Avery is that in animation, the director has control over every single frame of film.

So what do you do with that? If you're Bob Clampett, you take the concept just as far as you can. Sometimes, even farther.

In some of the early WB Clampett cartoons like "The Daffy Doc," he was pushing his animators to do things that were clearly beyond their drafting ability. So the results don't look so good even if the cartoon is funny, but it wasn't too long before they did.

Working with hand puppets on early TV must have seemed like a vacation...

J C Roberts said...

Good points both Peter and Pilsner Panther. I'm not sure why I said I was learning towards video artifact before. It was certainly possible to do it then, but it must've been a greater effort. That just proves that Clampett went the extra mile to get the look he did.


And no one bit on my "quiz" before, but the Rubberhead character is in the falling pile of characters 3 times. The only one to repeat more than once. You never really notice at full speed, and not all of them even cycle twice, but in the last frame one more Rubberhead enters. Unbelieva






-ble

Andrew said...

You never heard of "Destino" Pilsner Panther?