Saturday, October 10, 2009

Composition 13 - Harvey Eisenberg Compositions








This last one is another artist. It has no composition. Why?

These all came from Barbie again. She is a boon to cartoonkind.

coming...
and ...

21 comments:

The Artist Aficionado said...

I always prefer composition it makes the drawings and characters look tighter and more compact.

atombat said...

It has no flow of action, Hierarchy of control?

eminkey2003 said...

Hey John, can you do a post about tectonic and atectonic compositions in cartoons? I think most of the compositions you've posted are tectonic, i.e., all the negative and positive shapes are like puzzle pieces.

atombat said...

Sorry, I meant the last picture has no Hierarchy of control, it seems to be pretty flat with no definition on where the characters are moving to, it's pretty loose and it doesn't use the panel space efficiently.

Niki said...

I actually want to skip most of the Asifa cartooning and hit composition right now.

JoJo said...

The last pic by another artist doesn't have any room to breathe, so not enough negative space to separate the elements. Eisenberg on the other hand has a good amount to provide clarity. It looks like the artist was trying to frame the dragon using the silhouette of the castle, but again there is not enough space provided so it gets overlooked.

It looks like the crowd of people on the left could point to the dragon, but Snagglepuss has been placed right in the middle destroying the overall directional shape.

Fernando Sosa said...

Good stuff John,remember my childhood and the book of editorial Bruguera of Spain.
They published this comicbook in a pocket editions.

Trevor Thompson said...

Gabe Swarr in the house!

Bryce Johansen said...

John K said...
This last one is another artist. It has no composition. Why?

everything is too evenly set together, nothing sticks out. The people in the crowd are mixed with the main characters and the buildings clutter up the background. The main characters ain't pushed into being the main focus.

Trevor Thompson said...

Speaking in a purely technical sense, isn't Boo Boo just a WEE bit too close to Yogi in that first picture?

I'm still learning to analyze these drawings, and I think that Yogi's butt and Boo Boo's bow tie create line tangents, yes? Would it read better if Boo Boo was placed just a hair further to the right of the frame?

de aap said...

Last night I have been reading all your posts on Eisenberg, I love his work. You sure are right about him.

I tried to google him but there wasn't much about him. I saw he died rather young do you happen to know more about him?

Anyway, thanks for shairng, they shoud publish a collection of his work!

Vince M said...

Eisenberg was a comic book genius. I always liked his HB books best. I love this Dell/Gold Key period when panel borders were created with full bleed color.

Barbie rocks!

John said...

Good ol' Harvey Eisenberg - now there was a man who could draw.

Got some notes on these, if you wanna see 'em!

JohnK said...

Hey John

it's good you're studying that, but you're starting with the finished detailed shapes.

Start with the big shapes first.

SoleilSmile said...

John, I goofed and posted the "face twitch" post under the wrong entry. So delete the one I made under Harvery Eisenberg.

Sorry for the inconvenience!

Robert said...

The one with "no composition" has composition. The characters form a triangle with the blue dragon (?) as the apex.

Maybe not great, but it's a classic gambit. Taught by fine art teachers everywhere.

1/2 Bonus Point for making a slightly asymmetrical triangle.

In addition the perspective lines of the buildings lead to the focus, again the dragon. Another classic.

Robert said...

I'll also concur with an above commenter that there are bad tangents in the first (and fifth) pics

LeoBro said...

That's an amazing contrast in compositions. The most obvious thing for me is that the dragon doesn't fit within higher-level forms. It splits the overall frame in two separate pieces and there's nothing behind it to hold it all together. (No structural hierarchy)

It has almost no negative space. The Eisenberg compositions have lots of negative space that the important characters extend into.

Also there's no hierarchy of detail. Every part of the frame has the same amount of detail; eg. the cross-hatched windows in the buildings, background characters, foreground characters. The whole thing is cluttered and there is no graceful flow for the eye. Eisenberg leaves huge areas devoid of fine details. (The colors don't help either -- distant buildings are brightly colored while distant trees in the Eisenberg blend softly into the background.)

Even the smaller elements (in a hierarchical sense) lack composition. For example the row of five people behind the dragon. There's no pleasing shape to the group as a whole.

Very educational!

Dan Lee said...

this is all really interesting stuff. My classmate, John is always saying how great John K's lessons are. I'm going to have to back track and go through the lessons myself. I don't know enough technically about composition.

rodineisilveira said...

Johnny K.,

This excerpt from a Snagglepuss' story which you depicted on this topic, was drawn by Phil de Lara (who was animator at Warner [more exactly, on the Robert McKimson's unit]).

Tristan Lapoussiere said...

No, the Snagglepuss panel is not by Phil de Lara. He was a much better artist, with finer line and definitely better composition.