Friday, October 16, 2009

Writer and Screen 3 - stuff that cartoon writers don't know





and sure as Hell don't give a hoot about






http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com/uploaded_images/PDVD_028.2-702279.jpg
http://www.animationarchive.org/2005/11/filmography-tin-pan-alley-cats.html
commentary later...

18 comments:

Jorge Garrido said...

Great theories! From all the posts you and Eddie made about film that I've been going back and rereading, I've realized that film is primarily a medium of the image and the music, and the way they interact. Even a silent film, in the way the images flow and are cut, can be "musical."

Lluis fuzzhound said...

that is awesome stuff!!! enjoyed every bit of it!!
thanks!

Lluis fuzzhound said...

ohhh is that Charles Chaplin bit, where you got the Jetsons idea that got rejected?
great image!

384Sprites said...

Awesome!

IgnorantBliss said...

Lillian Gish is my bread and Butter i love HER

Ian Andersen said...

What film is the girl holding the gun from? I absolutely must see that after seeing that image.

Khaki Hat said...

Actually, I couldn't care less about the hotdog and the bun. Sadly I care about everything else, which means Ill never be admitted into the skank filled world of animation executive culture.

Bryce Johansen said...

I think the best way to tell a story is to be visual about it...nobody really likes to listen anyway...

Aaron said...

that bit of writing was good stuff

de aap said...

What a great post, very interesting!

(Here in the Netherlands we do get courses in film and animation history in our first year as animation students by the way. I loved those courses about Chaplin, Orson Welles and animation legends like Oskar Fischinger and Lotte Reiniger aswell as modern legends like Tex Avery and Chuck Jones.)

Lucas Nine said...

The girl with the gun is from "The Wind".
I think she's Lilian Gish...

Craig said...

The Chaplin picture at the FEED 'EM machine ("Modern Times"), was actually puppeteered under the table by Charlie himself!

Jack G. said...

Night of the Hunter is a great film.

A "B-film" too!

Great visuals and storytelling.

Charles Laughton's only director credit.

Pity the critics at the time were ho-hum about it.

I know Chaplin worked his stuff out on film through improvisation - but he used an awful lot of film to get his results.

With the advent of "Talkie" script writers, Buster Keaton was frustrated with the loss of pure visual moments in his films.

mr paal said...

"For in the beginning, art was one & indivisible."

That's a fantastic passage. It's certainly heartening to remember what we're doing when we make cartoons. Rather than getting wrapped up in the confines of specialization (& by that i mean making cartoons to fit development slates etc). Expression is a function of existing.

John, i've been busy of late, but had time to start the Jinks exercise. With these couple of drawings, everything i've learned thus far began to come together. I feel real progress & the lessons have been invaluable in both my personal & professional practises.

Many thanks!

Paul.

jinks

WJC said...

Another winner, thanks.

Ryan G. said...

Hey John. Have you heard about the three stooges movie coming out with Jim Carrey as Curley? I think Sean Penn will be Larry and Benico DelToro will be Moe..

Kelseigh said...

I always assumed most series cartoons just had a standard set of credit cards at the end that didn't change from episode to episode. I don't know if that's actually true, but most studios could certainly get away with it if they wanted, what with stations compressing credits to unreadable sizes so part of the screen can be used to promote other shows.

Molasses said...

i got to get this book. thanks for posting these exerpts.
what's the spider-like character from?