Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Country Fans


George Liquor swears he thinks music is for wimps, but even he, once in awhile needs to feel the sweeter emotions. He has a hidden Victrola in his closet and a stack of classic country songs that are about cutting down trees or things that are too sad to fathom. Like showing your love to someone with even part of a tree. The Louvin Bros. always make him cry because they sing about the most ignorant kind of pain.

MY FAVORITE VERSION

AND IF THAT DIDN'T MAKE YOU CRY


MORE SAD

The state of cartoons today is making me thing maybe I should become a country singer. It'd be a lot simpler.

29 comments:

Luis María Benítez said...

I love those drawings.

Sam Watterson said...

nice cheery song!

Chloe Cumming said...

They don't write enough sweet songs about beating people to death with sticks any more. Hi John!

JohnK said...

That's what I love about old country music. It proves that pure ignorance can still have great emotional beauty.

Eric said...

JohnK:
"pure ignorance"? I doubt that is even possible. The guy knew what he was doing.

Kali Fontecchio said...

I second that decision, but you obviously need a hat.

Stephen Worth said...

Don't become a country singer. Country music is in an even more sorry state than cartoons.

kurtwil said...

Stephen, at least there's John Fogerty and his creed carrying on some aspects of country.

side note: All of JK's drawing presentations (nice stuff here once again!) and comments makes me wonder what happens to animation when a true "mind linkage" device is created (it's not that far off) allowing artists to visualize and show their imagery without the mechanical struggle involved with drawing it?

Geneva said...

Maybe you could sing about the sorry state of cartoons!

These songs are so easy on the ears. Thanks for sharing!

RooniMan said...

Interesting you like country music, although I would not recommend becoming a country singer today, because country music today sounds WAY too poppy.

Tony DiStefano said...

I really dig the way these pieces are colored.Great control with markers which is not easy.

Elana Pritchard said...

Hasil Adkins grew up in Boone County, West Virginia where he didn't have a television, just a radio to listen to all of his favorite country stars. In his ignorance he thought musicians like Hank Williams and Johnny Cash played ALL of the instruments in the songs themselves, so when he decided to become a musician he taught himself to play ALL of the instruments too. All of his recordings were rejected by all the major country labels but he carried on anyways to make some of the weirdest, wildest country rockabilly ever. I feel like that's the state of a lot of cartoondom these days. True believers teaching themselves all of their "instruments" in their tiny little shacks across the country- going on to make some weird, wild stuff in the future.

hasil adkins- the hunch

Elana Pritchard said...

And if that didn't cheer you up, here's Ronnie Dawson- he sings like a girl!

ronnie dawson

JonJacob said...

Great work as always. I knew that George had a sensitive side... he just needs a little love, and some booze.

Don't we all?

Thanks John!

I wonder how Mr. Horse feels though.

Jack G. said...

I'd have to echo what Mr Worth said but add more to it-

The music business is in a sorry state.

If you want to do a band, do it as a hobby because the business encourages you to do crap (just like in the cartoon world).

JohnK said...

Well maybe, but making music is a lot cheaper than making a cartoon and you don't get notes till the song is actually finished I imagine.

thomas said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Roberto Severino said...

Cool drawings like always, Mr. K. That old country music is refreshing stuff compared to all that noise that passes off as music nowadays. I feel sorry for all the kids at my school who think that someone like Taylor Swift is the best thing to ever happen to music. They don't know what they're missing out on.

It's mind-boggling to me how anybody would wanna listen to noise, instead of a tune with a decent melody that you could actually hum to. Somehow that stuff still makes big money.

MistahB said...

nice! but don't go towards that road! Country today has enough issues as it is compared to cartoons!

-jjmm- said...

So you say music market and artistic environment of it isn't so much contaminated and deteriorated as cartoon one?

-jjmm- said...

Oh yea... it's cheaper. I read that later..

thomas said...

A career in music?

cowboyinsweden

John Young said...

Hi John, please please please keep fighting the good fight! and don't let the humorless prudes get you down. I can't believe no one's asked you to make a feature yet, it'd be the best thing EVER!

kurtwil said...

John W, I wouldn't despair. Like R.Bakshi said at COMICCON, the tools arrived a few years back letting small groups of artists and computer experts to make killer 2D features.

Do a web search for Mark Oftedal or Tom Polson and you'll find blogs showcasing their 2004 small group's cartoony, stylistic 2D film called "THE PUMPKIN OF NEYFAR".

Chip Butty said...

What do you get when you play a John K country music record backwards?

You get your medium and your show back!

Adam Tavares said...

I love songs like this. Human emotions can make normal people do horrible things.

Oh you can laugh at these simple country folk. You all think you're different. You all have your emotions under control but we'll see how you behave when you have your heart broken by a special cowgirl. Pretty soon you'll be the one drinking Listerine and murdering Mexican ranch hands just to fill the void where your heart USED to be!

*sniff* that triflin' no good... *sniff* GOD I LOVE HER!

HemlockMan said...

The Louvin Brothers version of KNOXVILLE GIRL is superb.

MistahB said...

can i see the entire picture?

Fata Morgana said...

I do enjoy these kind of country horror songs. I'd never heard of this one before, and reading a little bit about it uncovers that like many old "country" songs, it actually has Irish origins.

I wouldn't label this song the emotional beauty of ignorance, though. More like the tragedy of obsession and/or madness. Reminds me of the Violent Femmes' "Country Death Song."