Thursday, June 03, 2010

Gottfredson Rubber Hose Fun

My theory is that during the first year of an animation program, the students should learn basic animation by using classic rubber-hose characters and moving them the way animators moved things in the 1930s. Then they should work their way into slightly more organic characters the next year or 2.

WHY LEARNING TO ANIMATE WITH RUBBER HOSE STYLE SPEEDS YOUR PROGRESS

It's a very appealing style on its own and Floyd Gottfredson did it well.







http://comicrazys.com/2010/06/01/mickey-and-his-horse-tanglefoot-1933-dailies-floyd-gottfredson/

26 comments:

HemlockMan said...

I've never been able to figure out why I never cared for the non-Duck Disney characters. Ever since I was a kid, I enjoyed the Barks material, but everything else just bounced off.

Chad said...

John,here's a cool little site that charts the evolution of Gottfredson's style. His Mickey is never as cute as Fred Moore or some of the animators, but I think his storytelling is really dynamic throughout his career. It's funny how Barks and Gottfredson always seemed to be telling way more interesting stories with the Disney characters than you saw in the shorts.

http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~starback/dcml/creators/floyd-gottfredson.html

Oscar Grillo said...

Floyd Gotfredson & Al Tagliaferro are possibly the artists that have had the biggest impact in my life..Not only as an artist but also as as a person....Days ago I saw again "Ten Tall Men" with Burt Lancaster and I couldn't ignore how much I loved that film because it reminded me so much of "Mickey in The Foreign Legion" (Floyd Gotfredson, 1936)!

Roberto Severino said...

I had no idea you liked Floyd Gottfredson, but I'm very glad that you're discussing his work. I've looked at a few of his Mickey Mouse comics before on other websites, and I reached the same conclusion that you did about his style.

talkingtj said...

one of the truly most gifted and underrated comic strip artist of all time,iam a huge fan of gottfredson and i cannot understand why i cannot find a published collection of his work. thanks for bringing him up, big fan!

Jonathan Harris said...

I love the very rubber-hose Mickey standing next to the distinctly NON-rubberhose human in that third to last panel.

RooniMan said...

It's appealing alright.

Elana Pritchard said...

Awwwwww....Mickey's gambling debts

Bob Lilly said...

You never have to guess what a Gottfredson character is thinking or feeling...the face and the whole body clearly show it.

Steve LeCouilliard said...

Hey John! Thanks for posting this link. I'm the guy who scanned these pages for Chris and I'll be sending lots more in the coming months.

@Oscar Grillo: I have "Mickey in the Foreign Legion" I'll post it as soon as I find the time.

@talkingtj: I totally agree. Gottfredson is severely under-rated. Especially since Carl Barks gets so much attention. Barks is wonderful too, but it would be nice to see Gottfredson get more respect.

The book these scans are taken from this book:

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&tn=walt+disney%27s+best+comics+mickey+mouse&x=52&y=11

Pretty affordable actually, though it's out of print.

JohnK said...

Hi Steve

well thanks! Good work

I always liked this stuff.

Real eye candy!

ComiCrazys said...

I love the rubber hose style more than any other animation style. The cartoons of the 30s are so full of surreal cartoony fun, I don't think they've been matched since. Something so endearing about black and white as well.

As for Gottfredson, finding that Abbeville Press book was like finding gold. I had never seen the rubber hose style executed so perfectly in comic strips before then.

Not to mock the man in any way, but if you have seen Gottfredson's drawing hand, you would be even more amazed at the art he produced for so many years!

Oscar: I hope you don't mind, I just added a couple of Donny The Mouse images to the post, with a link to your Mortimer sketchbooks. I LOVE THOSE MORTIMER DRAWINGS!!!

The Jerk said...

I Love gottfredson, but the Abbeville press edition these scans come from butchers his work, dropping panels, and completely re-working the speech bubbles, which appear to have been re-translated into english from an italian printing. still, having this version of the art is better than none at all.

Scrawnypumpkinseed said...

I really like the simple cartoony look of these comics. The rubber-hose horse looks beautiful!

aalong64 said...

I love the way they drew hands in early 30's cartoons, literally as balls with sausages sticking out. It didn't look realistic, but it was funny.

Georgia Road Geek said...

Speaking of "rubber hose", ever seen any of the old "Welcome Back, Kotter" comic books?

Oliver_A said...

I think the early Disneys, especially Mickey Mouse cartoons from 1928-33, are way more funny than what Disney produced later. They may seem primitive, but you get the feeling that the animator(s) had some real fun bringing movement into the drawings. Watching the two "Mickey Mouse in Black and White" DVD sets made me laugh way more often than watching the two "Mickey Mouse in Color" sets, where the fun seems almost gone.

Shouldn't a topic about rubber hose style also feature Ub Iwerks, who I think was one of the geniuses of early animation? Before Walt claimed all the credit for his work.

Oscar Grillo said...

Thanks, Steve LeCouilliard! I have the complete Mickey works by Gotfredson. Mondadory published it in Italy, in color and in large format in black and white also.

Rich T said...

A complete Gottfredson Mickey story can be found in the Smithsonian collection of newspaper comics. Amazon recently said a new collection was coming out but I guess it got aborted.

Steve LeCouilliard said...

@ Oscar Grillo: Wow! The complete works! That must be a huge collection. How many years did he draw Mickey?

@ Rich T. Yeah, I have that book too. It has a great Thimble Theatre story in it, the first appearance of Alice the Goon! That book is a treasure trove that I highly recommend to anyone who likes old comics. Cliff Sterrett, Wash Tubbs and Captain Easy, George McManus, The Katzenjammer Kids, Little Orphan Annie, DIck Tracy, Krazy Katt, Little Nemo, Terry and the Pirates, Li'l Abner, Gasoline Alley... It really belongs on everyone's bookshelf

Oscar Grillo said...

In April 1930 he started working on the four-month-old Mickey Mouse comic strip and his last one was published on November 15, 1975and his last Sunday strip on September 19, 1976, Steve LeCouilliard. Mondadori (and later Rizzoli) published it in diferent editions over many decades, naturally in Italian translation.

Steve LeCouilliard said...

45 years! I thought it was something like that. That's incredible. Signing his name "Walt Disney" the whole time. Heh.

sharprm said...

Do they use construction in drawings for anime like 'spirited away'?

Michael Sporn said...

Great stuff. I've never been Gottfredson's biggest fan, but you've forced into taking another look. Thanks.

talkingtj said...

fyi-the smithsonian collection that was referenced here can still be found here in new york for as little as $15 bucks, i know cause i just got one! i had it originally in 1980 as a christmas gift and over the years it got destroyed, never thought id see it again. a couple of months ago i was in the strand book store and there it was mint condition-still shrink wrapped, $15 bucks! SOLD!! apparently some independent book stores could never fit it on their shelves, its big, so they languished in the back, you gotta ask.

SparkyMK3 said...

Hm, fun looking stuff.

As simple as Mickey and the gang are as far as being characters go, i still find their cartoons likable and even genuinely funny on occasion, "ignorant" or not. Sure, i'll take Betty Boop, Popeye, Looney Tunes, and maybe even Woody Woodpecker over them, but the Disney cartoons can at least put a smile on my face.

By the way John, one thing i realized is that as big of a Clampett fan as you are, you have yet to do a blog post on one of Bob Clampett's early masterpieces-Porky in Wackyland (and i would also like to see you rip apart that awful remake by Friz Freleng called ''Do for the Do-Do'')!