Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Illustration and Cartooning

It's hard to believe how high the standards in popular arts were just a few decades ago.





25 comments:

Roberto Severino said...

That blog is amazing! How did you find it? It's astounding how there are still so many great blogs and resources that I don't know about. I just added it as one of my bookmarks right now.

"It's hard to believe how high the standards in popular arts were just a few decades ago."

It's also hard to believe how you saw those standards crumble to the ground. That must have been hard to endure.

Shawn Dickinson said...

Wow! That Hirschfeld street scene is amazing!

Malcolm said...

Hirschfeld was truly a god amongst men. His line work is practically unmatchable. Thanks for the link, John.

Luis María Benítez said...

Something like "Out of this World" is missing nowadays. I love that kind of drawing.

MDG14450 said...

I check that blog every day, especially since it drifted away from it's stated topic.

"It's hard to believe how high the standards in popular arts were just a few decades ago."

And I don't think they've dropped because of a lack of talent--I think it's more due to the opposing forces of "the cult of the artist," and the lack of art directors/editors/movie and TV producers who don't know how to set and hold creative people to standards.

Jessica said...

I'm so glad you found this blog! I stumbled upon it a ways back after seeing a link to some of those great, pulp covers and then ended up loving it more just because it covers so many different other styles that I like.

For anyone interested, another good one I've found is:

"http://one1more2time3.wordpress.com"

For the most part, great images of backgrounds and concept art from the older Disney movies (Bambi, Pinocchio, Snow White, etc.) and sometimes some WB.

This post was interesting in particular, how the backgrounds for Bambi developed:

"http://one1more2time3.wordpress.com/2009/07/03/style-5/"

Iron maiden said...

what happend to art like this?

do you blame filmation ,disney ,upa or some other company?

Isaak said...

John K

What do you think of the illustrations in Dickens? Instead of drawing the people in a "realistic" manner, the characters appear as sketches and for me are quite appealing.
For example, it can be seen the illustrator had fun with Fagin.

talkingtj said...

this type of work is what i DID NOT SEE on display at the school of visual arts.i did see this type of work at the SOCIETY OF ILLUSTRATORS, take the kids out of class at the school of visual arts, walk them down to the society of illustrators, then, for homework,make them copy everything they see posted on your blog.solution!

Guy Cx said...

You people wanna blame someone for humanity's artistic decay?

Blame capitalism.

It's that simple.

John A said...

Photoshop effectively killed the world of illustration.

Niki said...

I really like Al Hirshfeld's paintings, his ink works too.

Martin Juneau said...

This beautiful illustrations is something i see nowhere in today's society. And John A is right, softwares like Photoshop (Tough i use more for the colouring) and Paint Tool SAI morphed peoples to anarchic imitations of good illustrations and cartoonings nowadays.

kurtwil said...

Once again some fine examples keep this blog humming right along!

BTW, JK and others, did you know the video game industry still expects submissions of __storyboards__ for game title proposals? That's right folks, game companies are not interested in illustrated radio like network/cable TV - they require honest to gawd illustrations (MS in particular)!

JK, you might seriously look into that arena as games with story (such as the recently released and successful psycho thriller "Alan Wake") are growing in popularity. The cut scenes or story setup scenes can sometimes last several minutes!
Also, some consoles such as MS's Kinect (formerly project Natal) will recognize body/face language - imagine George Liquor or Ren/Stimpy being able to respond to a player's smile/smirk/gesture, etc?

Paul B said...

Hey John! Have you seen Ole Jensen caricatures? I think they are great!

Ole Jensen

Elana Pritchard said...

Comic shop clerks of North America= sheer brilliance.

Shucks John. I honestly think incorporating subject matter is a great way to encourage people to get better at drawing and animation in general. Not that I'm a master drawer by any means, but I am a teacher, and I have been recently been teaching my preschool class about stop motion animation. They are 4 years old. Four. Not even old enough to read yet. And how did I get them to understand how animation works? By asking them what they are into and making a stop motion cartoon about that subject. It happened that they were really into Star Wars, so I had them make "Star Wars ships" out of legos and move them around frame by frame while I took digital pictures. Not only did this teach them about how animation works, but it also taught them to be passionate about animation. Passion. Something we can both agree is lacking in cartoons today.

-jjmm- said...

I guess my previous coment was too long; or wasn´t well writed, well sorry for that. Anyway, I thought I was being respectful.

Gad said...

well if you are into that stuff
i think most of the examples you gave are simply appalling
especially the one with the ship...
it's a complete mass of details

and although i like the cheesiness of pulp fiction magazine covers... i would hardly consider them as good

if any thing i prefer the classical illustrators of the 19th century like Gustave Dore and the guy that illustrated Alice in wonderland

ASIFA got some pretty nice examples some good classical illustrators

Oscar Grillo said...

Check the work of Olaf Gulbransson, Hirschfield's inspiration.

Stephen Worth said...

Oscar, I'm a big fan of Gulbarnsson, as well as Heine, Paul and especially Rudolf Wilke. I'll be posting a lot of their caricatures at the archive site soon.

Stephen Worth said...

Another big influence on Hirschfeld... Covarrubias

Oscar Grillo said...

You haven't published yet my comment on Gulbransson but I would like to tell you HOW MUCH I LOVE WILKE'S WORK!!! What a shame he died aged 35!
His art sends shivers down my spine.

Here is his obituary (In German)
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_PtnVGPtWelw/SMqUKs9q83I/AAAAAAAAEGI/nontjJnQkDQ/s1600-h/Wilke%27s+Obituary.jpg

lastangelman said...

Drew Friedman's comic shop clerks are freakin' fantastic. I had my Drew books stolen some time ago and Drew's brother Josh gave me copies of first editions, what a mensch! Drew is so amazing as an illustrator it's both funny and deadly, this is the guy Robert Crumb is in awe of.

Randall said...

Speaking of high standards. Saw this today and wondered how well the artist did based on your critique.
http://ugliesttattoos.com/2010/07/01/funny-tattoos-space-madness/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UgliestTattoos+%28Ugliest+Tattoos%29

RooniMan said...

So much eye candy.