Sunday, August 15, 2010

Tezuka Studies

Boy it's amazing how little has changed since Tezuka started this style.





28 comments:

Roberto Severino said...

John, I didn't know you actually studied from anime. It was quite a shock to see something like this on your blog because for a long time, I thought you didn't care for the style (I'm not really an anime fan either, but there's some great draftsmanship on many of the modern anime shows I've seen, and I like the animation Japan was producing in the 1930s, even though I haven't much of it).

Noel said...

A lot has changed since then, Japanese animation done well....is incredible. For me, It's their attention to detail,scale and action. Why is Japanese Anime so huge worldwide...that many people can't be blind. You are right certain aspects or the style hasn't changed much ,but, that's what's cool about it.

SparkyMK3 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
RooniMan said...

I'm amazed at how the style degraded afterwards over the years into poo.

Guy Cx said...

I didn't know you were into Osamu Tezuka, John!

Do you also appreciate Akira Toriyama's work?

Jonathan Harris said...

What brought these on? You've said in the past that you thought Tezuka's style was appealing (that is, you'd have watched an Astro Boy movie if it looked like his own cartoons), but I didn't get the impression you liked it enough to do studies like you always do for your heroes.

Are you investigating the negative or positive aspects with these?

Iron maiden said...

wow nice drawings john,Its really inspiring

Brubaker said...

John K doing anime? Now I've seen everything.

The original design of Tezuka's "Goku" always seems jarring to me. I'm more familiar with the design used in the TV series:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jc3fZSFUvSs

The girl in the 3rd pic (Melmo) has an interesting history: basically the show was created as a way of getting sex-education presented on children's television. It's true!

Austin Papageorge said...

I guess these are good, John, but they lack the sincerity of an authentic anime. It just seems to me that whenever a western artist tries to do anime, it is colder than the real thing.

J. said...

Anime? On my john k.? It's more likely than you think.

She-Thing said...

NOW... Uderzo! You take one of comics and contains everything, character, perspective, composition, story... I'd love you to analyze/draw his stuff someday.

IgnorantBliss said...

I think that Japanese animation and "cartooning" is a mixed bag. Some of the shows i've seen are god awful in terms of instant appeal. Some is very appealing to my eye and I see great principles underneath most of it all. I DO think that the atmosphere and all that is sincluded in that category is often magnificent. I think early anime and recent anime do these things better than almost all commercial American cartooning. For instance, I have mixed feelings on some of the Studio Ghibli output. BUt in all of their productions i have seen, I am AMZED at the geniune craftsmanship that goes into the stpry's "tone". (: I also think the older anime, like Tezuka's, is often cute and has a unique feeling to it. One last thought, have you noticed that the principles of naimation in Japan are probably different? Sqush and Stretch is apparently a rarity ;o

Zorrilla said...

In a Tezuka comic I'm reading, there's a panel with a cartoony fight scene, and a crate that says "Milt Gross". ;-)

(The comic is "Swallowing the Earth")

Martin Juneau said...

At least, your Anime studies have hierarchy and construction behind this. Today's Anime is look like it's made by a generic base but without outfits and hairs. Austin reflection is right. It's better to leave the Japanese artists do Anime than us, can't do that much.

Archie said...

Hey John, i'm was just wondering if the animation industry hold any events for active animators or animation companies, where they all get together to give each other advice on new ways of working or different ways to approach their work. The games industry has events like these where they all seem to personally address the industry and what they need to do to improve it and remain active.

Raff said...

......aaaand John K's drawing anime. Apocalypse 2012 noted on calendar.

Gary Wintle said...

It was your posts about Tezuka's work that really got me into it, John. Thanks!

I'm living in Japan right now and am always searching around for new Tezuka art. His animals are by far my favourite aspect of his stuff, his wide range of strange looking people, second. Actually, reading his comics makes you realize just how conservative modern manga is in comparison. I've been reading Buddha and his townsfolk are out there!

nicktheofficeninja said...

@ Austin
Seriously, why is it that every time a western artist does some anime studies, someone has to chime in and make it about how Eastern artists are somehow better than Western artists?

CJ said...

Austin Papageorge"

I agree with you. When Americans try and imitate of mimic the anime style I've seen very few authentically get the styles similar to the real deal. I think this is because American artists have a tendency to implement principals we consider correct with out debate and are thus, always going to show up in some form in the style Japanese influenced style most try to understand.

But it seems to be one of those things that requires practice and a new set of rules.

CJ said...

RooniMan:

That's a very biased look at the industry.

Both American and Asian animated art forms have degraded or formulated some principals in some form or fashion.

What you're saying is the equivalent of a Japanese person looking at American cartoons and saying that all of the existing animations after 1960 are crap and hold no real principals.
Just because we import or showcase animation we don't consider worthwhile doesn't mean there aren't some animated gems back in Japan.

C said...

Funny Astro Boy toy

I find Astro boy cute. He looks like Betty Boop's lost kid.

Rothello said...

The Astro Boy cartoons didn't have good animation by any stretch of the imagination. Even a kid could recognize such.

But man, I always just really loved the character designs; Tezuka's stuff looks so very appealing to me. It's very cute and cartoony!

The Butcher said...

"Do you also appreciate Akira Toriyama's work?"

I've asked him this same question a lot too, but don't think he answered. My guess is he'd go nuts over the beautiful backgrounds and stubby, caricatured cars and buildings. Also bet he'd appreciate the girls.

Cpl Ethane said...

As someone who does draw in the anime/manga style, and being an American, to say that westerners can't grasp the Japanese style is pure bunk. In fact, take a look at Howie Posts's Audrey and Wendy -- or even the short-lived newspaper Audrey and compare it to modern Japanese stuff. You'll find more similarities than you think.

Also the principles that John is constantly discussing in this blog are completely adaptable to anime and manga, which many of the artists over there use.

If you don't like anime or manga that's fine, but don't treat it like some completely alien form of comics when it really isn't.

Steven Hartley said...

Cute.

ChrisK said...

AWESOME! Someone had to say it.

He-Sick Sailor said...

John a lot has changed. Today's anime follows none of the principals that you and others promote.

J. said...

John, since we're on the topic of japanese animation, I really think you should take a look at these. It's the pilot episode for an anime show called Lupin the 3rd. While the following series turned out to be very popular, both in japan and overseas, the animation was quite lacking. However the original pilot had some brilliantly well-made animation and character design at least on my standards. Either way, I think it's definitely worth a look.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMhr_6BVO3Y
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzEjwNUcTP0