Monday, November 01, 2010

Dong Kingman





18 comments:

mr paal said...

...WOW!

litlgrey said...

I'm thinking that what I am seeing here is a cross between Edward hopper and Red Grooms.

Erik B said...

Wow nice paintings, they look a little derpressing and haunted.
Except the one with the bright colours with the t shaped frame.

Rooniman said...

Thats some mighty fine paint work, there.

Chloe Cumming said...

They're great paintings, to be that complex yet that readable is an accomplishment. I am very slowly learning a lot of it's usually about good planning. And obviously the colour is great, the bright parts mean more when the neutral parts are so perfectly controlled.

cartoonretro said...

He's great, I have several of his books. Clear and unique compositions, with a cool moody and cartoony feel.
There is a great book called California Scene Painters that includes Kingman, Lee & Mary Blair, Fletcher Martin, Hardie Gramatky, and other great watercolorists.

Roberto Severino said...

I don't believe I've heard of Dong Kingman before. Who was he exactly, besides a fantastic painter?

Ron Ferdinand said...

As an interesting aside,when Hank Ketcham was preparing for his all too brief fine arts career,he had a few classes with Dong Kingman. Hank loved the watercolor process
and tried to approach his cartooning with that same spontaneous feel.

Rogelio T. said...

There's a good educational film of him painting at Archive.org
here
It's directed by James Wong Howe.

Nate said...

John is there anything that you would take from Kingman and apply to background design?

I know you are a big fan of open uncluttered spaces. These are fine arts paintings, but is his approach too complicated for cartoons?

JohnK said...

I like them, but think a simpler approach is needed for cartoons.

Dubious Duck said...

These work on so many levels, they are multi-dimensional, have great use of contrast and colors. This had to have inspired UPA.

SandraRivas said...

I love the colors and the composition from Dong Kingman! Very natural and exciting at the same time! Every time I read your posts, I start to understand colors a little more. And it's always a pleasure to be introduced to new artists. I only wish I could paint or at least use colored pencils. I already know markers hate me.

I do agree that cartoons should have better colors. It not only appeals to the kids, but to the adults as well. Even the teenagers can get sick of seeing the garish colors constantly.

I always believed that cartoons were for everyone, not just for kids, unless I'm missing something.

Paul Penna said...

Great to see that Kingman hasn't been entirely forgotten. He was something of a household name in the San Francisco Bay Area when I was growing up - well, as household a name for a fine artist can be, anyway. You'd see his name in the papers and reproductions and lithographs of his work in shops all over. Some of his work can be seen inn the title sequences of some films. Particularly gorgeous are his paintings during the main titles of "Flower Drum Song," which naturally feature some SF scenes. His painting of the Golden Gate Bridge dissolves into live-action of the bridge itself. Also "55 Days at Peking" and "The Sand Pebbles."

SoleilSmile said...

BEAUTY!!! I just LOVE BGs. They're my current passion. What stumps me is proper line weight and hierarchies on buildings. I have industrial design books that instruct proper clean up, but I notice that Maurice Noble and many other BG layout artists work contrary to these books and do not thicken the baseline of a building like a product illustrator.
A building and a product are not the same thing. My friend Aaron says, the reason why the line is not thickest at the bottom of drawn building, is that in life, you can't see under it (the building).

Does that make any sense to you, John?

HemlockMan said...

I've never heard of him. Beautiful paintings, though.

william wray said...

this is mostly early stuff-- he did simpler later.

Jim Smith said...

I like these for sure.. Reminds me of some Disney 40s and 50s concept art. Great name the guy's got, too.