Monday, June 20, 2011

No Words Necessary

35 comments:

Brian Damage said...

Wonder where he got the name Popeye.

Roberto Severino said...

Hey! Where are Popeye's gums??! Did he have those rot too?

jeffreyJack said...

The misshapen pile of pummeled face putty which is Popeye. This looks like a UA version to me but what do I know. My favorite Popeye cartoon of all time was an old one that was part animated and part live action. The story had a kid in an old alley who was being terrorized by some lummox. Pops came and offered him spinach so the kid could murderize him. A scratchy old memory from the Popeye Cartoon Theatre. Does anybody else remember this one?

Andy 7 said...

Wellllll...blow me down!

SparkyMK3 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
furrykef said...

No, I think one word is necessary:

"What?"

Steven M. said...

Popeye at his best.

Paul B said...

WOW! That's beautiful!

Scrawnycartoons said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Adam said...

Hey how come you havent mentioned that Lynne Naylor was like a co creator of Stimpy? You always just mention her as being good at drawing girls

J C Roberts said...

Wow, I haven't seen one of those looking so "fresh" in years. I still have one, but it's dried up and shrivled. I wonder how this one was stored that it survived so well. I'd take a picture of the one I have but the flash might cause it to crumble to dust.

They were "puppets", made of foam rubber, with three holes in the back to put your fingertips. You wiggle your fingers to magically bring him to life. 'cause we all remember how Popeye's skull used to pulse and wiggle all the time.

Damiano D said...

Hahaha! That's great! Gotta appreciate the individuality of these things nowadays.

glamaFez said...

That mouth looks like it was designed to hold something

daniel said...

that's one jaw dropping plush toy.

JohnK said...

Lynne is good at drawing lots of things. She helped me do many presentations for shows, including Ren and Stimpy and she drew and animated lots of stuff with me.

I created the characters though.

paul said...

Here's a random question, John K.:

As an artist, illustrator, and cartoonist, would it be okay to study Bill Waterson and Dr. Seuss?

JohnK said...

Of course. Study lots of great cartoonists.

kurtwil said...

Anyone remember that years ago Mattel made puppets of Popeye, with plastic head and cloth body, containing a plastic record voicebox? Pull the ring and you got various Popeye phrases and sound fx including punching out Bluto.

The Butcher said...

Woah...

Sven Hoek said...

looks like he was "blown down" one too many times.

Robert Schachter said...

I prefer the popeye without the white part of the eye, just the pupil. But this is still a pretty cool toy

Trevor Thompson said...

I can think of several words, but they're all dirty.

Thiago Levy said...

So here is where we ask random questions wright? What is the best city for an Story Artist / Animator / Cartoonist. I am sure it is not Miami! Also, should I just go or should I try to find a job first? It is hard to believe that someone would hire some guy from Miami instead one of the hundreds knocking at the door.

Thanks

Isaak said...

Do you think Dumbo did a good job of being a drama? It gets very dark before obviously everyone ends up happy.

P.S: Why do you think the crows were voiced by white actors, when Clampett had the sense to have African-American characters voiced by African-Americans, considering the "unfortunate implications?"

Thank you

SparkyMK3 said...

(Do you think Dumbo did a good job of being a drama? It gets very dark before obviously everyone ends up happy.)

John's probably heard questions like this a million times by now, so i'll save him the frustration of answering by telling you for him.

John only likes certain scenes in Disney films--particularly, he likes their dramatic scenes in Disney films--scenes like the Queen's transformation in Snow White, and Night On Bald Mountain. He likes the scenes in the abstract, but dosen't actually believe in them. And he certainly dosen't think those films work as dramas, though.

John does NOT care for the pathos scenes in Disney films. At all. He finds them phony and insincere, using everything BUT the characters emotions to strongarm you into crying over it--stuff like staging, effects, music, etc. Seriously, watch any of their pathos scenes with the sound off (or with the color off, if you're willing to go that far to prove a point)--not so emotionally powerful now, are they?

Taco Wiz A.K.A That One Guy said...

@Isaak

WALL-E beats out any other animated movie ever as darkest. Though the apocalyptic events already happened by the opening scene, it's revealed that other than the 100,000 passengers on the survivors' spaceship thing, all of the humans died out 700 years ago.

You know, for kids!

Trevor Thompson said...

Isaak - Clampett loved jazz and wasn't a racist. The same could not be said about Walt.

Isaak said...

Thank you. I understand the point Disney uses pathos as a bludgeon one too many times.

Isaak said...

Also, approximately how many of these tchochkes of golden animation do you own? I love the sheer variety of the items.

Archie said...

Looks like something to put your spare snooker balls in.

David Germain said...

That'll keep the kids off your lawn.

Isaak said...

Good point Trevor Despite that, in an old WWII era short about the body's defenses being comparable to an army in live action, one of the actors was African-American, and wasn't treated as inferior. Was it to inspire confidence we could overcome racism for the war, or did Disney's conscience come through on that short?

Thank you

J C Roberts said...

Isaak- I don't think John owns most of the ones you see here. He's got pals that send him pics from their collections.

The picture here doesn't give much of an idea of scale, but they're about the size of the average bagel. One of the biggest problems using this as a "puppet", is that the holes in the back didn't line up so you could open and close the mouth at all. All you could do is scrunch up his whole head in different ways. They were very light and soft, too. You could have whipped one at a baby's face without doing them any harm. (but don't try that...)

I guess if you had a little sailor suit for a sleeve it could help, but on the other hand, think how different the early Fleischer Popeyes would have been if the main character were a floating, mushed up head.

J C Roberts said...

I couldn't resist posting a shot of my own one of these as a strong warning to take good care of your spongy head squeezy puppets. If you're going to grow up in the 60s, and your parents are chimneys, then it's your Popeye head that's going to pay the price

(and by the way, I remembered wrong, there's 5 holes in the back, three for his forehead alone)
Ahoy

John Paul Cassidy said...

This looks exactly like the Popeye done by Gene Deitch for the 1960s TV show! Very impressive!

Where did you get this head from? Or did you make it? I'm intrigued!