Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Posing: Action and Reaction

 The most obvious simplest way to compose 2 characters talking to each other is

have the one who is talking lean towards the one who is listening
the listening character leans back at less of an angle than the speaker leans forward


Aim the eyes at each other too for good communication between the characters


Of course you don't always want to use that formula. It wouldn't be natural.

Here the character talking is leaning back and thinking out loud while the other character leans in the other direction-but she connects to him with her eyes.



 In continuity, you should vary the degrees of action and reactions and have the characters take turns.

Variety of poses and expressions is more natural than repeating the same poses or having each character in the same pose in a scene.



Oh and thanks to Ger Apeldoorn, Mark Christianson, Mark Kausler and Yowp for making these beautifully drawn comics available to the world!

11 comments:

Paul B said...

Hi John how do you see this attempt at Slab?

Slab 4th attempt

Herman Gonzales said...

interesting, thanks John.

Facundo Ezequiel said...

I just wanted to let you know this site if you didn't already: http://archive.org/details/classic_cartoons

Erik Butter said...

Good stuff to think about when drawing.

Paul B said...

Hi John, this is another inking from the model of Slab:
How do you see it?

Slab model

kurtwil said...

Really good stuff for toons!

Do producers of "adult" animation actually care about any of this in their shows? Particularly FOX?

Some of this is in SIMPSONS (especially the recent JK intro), but almost none's in FAMILY GUY and its clones.

Paul B said...

Better?
I read the posts about inking and see the examples, but Im not sure yet what I'm missing...


Slab model 2

Mark Kilkelly said...

I'm currently working on a degree animation film and this helps me get into a good frame of mind for posing characters in storyboarding. Thanks for the help, John.

Ken said...

The poses reflect the characters, everything happening to them at that moment, what they're doing.

If a person acts obnoxious to an animal, the animal might get scared, so his reaction would be to curl up in a little fuzzy ball, or attack the person, depending on the type of animal. A type of reaction that pushes back when one goes a little to far.

I imagine always standing perfectly straight would feel rather uncomfortable. And it would be hard to express your discomfort when your whole body moves like a statue.

That's the kind of thing I fear whenever the thought crosses my mind of Cartoon characters being alive like in Cool World, or Roger Rabbit, those characters brought to life, so lively, so colorful, Just imagine what He-Man or She-Ra would say if they were brought to life in the real world( Why God why?!, Cripple!, Please shoot me now, etc....)

Or maybe they would just repeat the same catchphrase to you over and over, like a puppet, or an action figure. That's probably right.

That is all.

Ken said...

The poses reflect the characters, everything happening to them at that moment, what they're doing.

If a person acts obnoxious to an animal, the animal might get scared, so his reaction would be to curl up in a little fuzzy ball, or attack the person, depending on the type of animal. A type of reaction that pushes back when one goes a little to far.

I imagine always standing perfectly straight would feel rather uncomfortable. And it would be hard to express your discomfort when your whole body moves like a statue.

That's the kind of thing I fear whenever the thought crosses my mind of Cartoon characters being alive like in Cool World, or Roger Rabbit, those characters brought to life, so lively, so colorful, Just imagine what He-Man or She-Ra would say if they were brought to life in the real world( Why God why?!, Cripple!, Please shoot me now, etc....)

Or maybe they would just repeat the same catchphrase to you over and over, like a puppet, or an action figure. That's probably right.

That is all.

ALPHABATE said...

good stuff, chap