Saturday, January 26, 2013

Inking Tips: UNDERSTAND the drawing before you ink it

Here's a swell pencil drawing of Ernie by Jim Smith. Jim is very good at suggesting form even with rough sketches. If the drawings aren't carefully cleaned up or inked, they can easily flatten out and lose their impact. So it's important to analyze a drawing before you start inking. The first thing is to note how the biggest forms are constructed and how they relate to each other in dimension and position.
It's also a very good practice to connect the cranium to the body with the neck - even when you don't see the neck because it is behind the chin.
A lot of artists have problems understanding the relation between the cheeks and the smile lines. the line at the top of a cheek and the line underneath that describes the smile are 2 borders of a piece of meat that you use to make expressions. They should look like they make a form that points to the nostril.
More to come...

17 comments:

Triadsense said...

I had to feel my face to understand this. In a few weeks I have to draw a portrait for an assignment. Out of my head. No references. This will certainly help me.

Triadsense said...

I had to feel my face to understand this. In a few weeks I have to draw a portrait for an assignment. Out of my head. No references. This will certainly help me.

Erik Butter said...

Thanks i always like you're lessons!
Always good to remind these youngsters
about this stuff.(me included)
By the way, i hope you're not being to distracted by people harassing you. Seeing the latest comments on the previous post... kinda worried me.

John Rouse said...

Am I the only one who has noticed that the more I learn from, and adhere to the style of these lessons, the more everything I draw seems to be composed of wieners and boobies?

Archie said...

I wish all these tip were in a nice big book. Awesome lessons, thanks John :)

Paul B said...

Thanks for all John!

Tamsin Parker said...

Great post as always, John!

Waack said...

Fantastic work, Mr. Kricfalusi.
If it's not too much trouble, I'd like to point out that your work on Ren and Stimpy as well as other programs like the Yogi Bear shorts have touched my emotions in a way that I've never thought cartoons could before. "Stimpy's Fan Club," especially.
Thank you for being the most amazing psychological cartoonist in the world.

kurtwil said...

Nice to see current examples of the rare art of constructive inking. Will keep them in mind should my own little project take off.

COL's looking really cool. If it did (does !!) morph into a series, who might do GL's voicework?

Tom Barradas said...

Love this lesson. Jim's a supremely talented artist and a helluva guitar player too -- a true inspiration!

Juz Capes said...

good stuff, much appreciated.

Mattieshoe said...

I can't thank you enough for putting up all these fantastic lessons for us, John. It's like having free tuition to the best animation school in the world.

daniel said...

hi john,
you might want to know that Paperman is now on youtube here's a link (dont really know how to put links so here's the direction)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=aTLySbGoMX0#!

daniel said...

hi john,
you might want to know that Paperman is now on youtube here's a link (dont really know how to put links so here's the direction)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=aTLySbGoMX0#!

Devon Wells said...

Thanks John, helpful as always.

Devon Wells said...

Thanks John, helpful as always.

Gyula Korpás said...

Off/

Dear John K,

Thank you for your blog. While I kinda enjoy the bad stuff too as somebody who loves to watch animation I have to agree that a great deal of technique got lost thanks to the great breakdown of budget during the 50s.

I too want to be an animator or at least try being one one day and I would like to learn it he classic way.

/Off
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Yeah. Good advice I need to learn my shapes better. That's one of the reason why my stuff looks bad.