Saturday, May 21, 2011

Lichty, a Real Man's Cartoonist

Look at this great drawing and technique.

















LOTS MORE LICHTY at the ANIMATION ARCHIVE

22 comments:

Steven M. said...

No one can be any manlier.

Zartok-35 said...

Rod Scribner's favorite cartoonist. It appears he also influeneced Jim Unger, to some extent.

His backgrounds are wonderful.

Roberto Severino said...

Beautiful!!!!

I never saw the "Draw Cartoons" pages posted anywhere though. Anyways, what a treat!

John Rouse said...

Did he do all of his work at that scale? I may have to switch to that format at some point in the future. I think drawing on a computer all the time is giving me crappy eyesight. I feel inclined to go buy a big roll of banner paper and some Marks-a-Lots. I wonder how he got those textures. Conte crayon rubbings, maybe? And is that J.R. "Bob" Dobbs supervising!?

Damiano D said...

Wow, I love how loose the line-work is and how much energy these drawings have!

ComiCrazys said...

A few years ago I donated my Lichty collection to Animation Archive. Check some of it out here.

Trey Brown said...

what a master of value. i cant tell if his grays are watercolor or charcoal but that bastard can draw.

zmerrill said...

Loose lines with lots of control, a nice combo indeed!

Pete Emslie said...

I contend that using real media like pencil, brush and ink on illustration board produces gutsier art than can ever be created on the computer. A well-crafted brush line shows how the artist actually "feels" the solid form of his characters as he inks them. Old school cartoonists like Lichty will always remain superior to the Photoshop/Illustrator-jockeys that saturate the market today.

zmerrill said...

"I contend that using real media like pencil, brush and ink on illustration board produces gutsier art than can ever be created on the computer. A well-crafted brush line shows how the artist actually "feels" the solid form of his characters as he inks them. Old school cartoonists like Lichty will always remain superior to the Photoshop/Illustrator-jockeys that saturate the market today."

While Lichty's cartoons the way they were made I think look much better than what it would be if it were drawn by computer, I do believe that there are exceptions to that rule. Gorillaz, for instance, are drawn on computer and still look wonderful, especially considering the Feel Good Inc. music video for instance.

HemlockMan said...

He's another one I really, really enjoyed when I was a kid. His books were all over the house. I enjoyed his toons because he excels in drawing smartasses. If you can convey a smartass with a few deft lines, then you are indeed a master cartoonist.

mike f. said...

The Grin and Bear It daily cartoon from 4/22/68 (6th scan down from the top) features a wall map of Vietnam that includes the cities "Hoo Dar", "Hoo Dat", "Ho Hum", "Wat Ho" and "Hoo Seh Dat".

Haw haw!

(I'll bet some humor-deprived, kneejerk P.C. dullard will find a reason to take issue with that. You know the type; they're so much fun to sit next to at parties...)

martinjuneau said...

John and everyone else, thanks for all of the heads-up to those wonderful cartoonists. They are among the greatest persons ever existed, truly.

Lichty's drawings and humanity view should be examined to all artists especially today who just blabbing to governments but just think to their material comfort besides to don't pay themeselves taxes. (Like Bono's U2) It piss me off that we have to live with those talents hacks when in the Online world, there's a multitude of greatest artists and cartoonists to discover and analysing. But it takes culture and a actual sense of organisation for be a artist today. Not just watching cartoons and play videogames.

Paul Penna said...

Lichty live on TV, 1953.

Justin said...

As someone who recently rediscovered how fun it is to draw and wants to educate himself and improve on fundamentals, years after I abandoned visual arts for others,I find your blog an invaluable resource. When I was younger, I naively thought construction was for artists who didn't know how to draw by eye--how badly I wish I could have read these lessons when I was 11! Your blog posts are inspiring as they are informative. I am going to follow your lessons from the beginning--though I admit it's hard to stop reading all your posts because they're fascinating. I was 9 years old when Ren and Stimpy came out and at the time wanted nothing more than to be an animator -I was already in love with chuck jones, tex avery, etc, but was totally inspired by seeing the crazy spectacle of my favorite old daffy duck cartoons in a completely contemporary context. Also have fond memories of watching Mighty Mouse with my dad--which shows you how good those were if he was willing to wake up early on a Saturday! It's a rare pleasure to see someone who really cares about what they do and takes the time to share his knowledge with other people. THANK YOU!

Sandra Rivas said...

I think I just died and went to Manly Cartoonist Heaven

The shading and inks techniques are astounding!!

J C Roberts said...

The grays have a texture to them, so I'd be surprised if they were watercolor. I'd say he either used a textured paper and charcoal, or from the look of it, it could also be the kind of rub-off ben day patterns I used years ago. Ben day, the stuff newspaper strips would use to place gray half tones in the strips (like Beetle Bailey's uniform). It would come in adhesive sheets that you would have to cut with an x-acto knife, or rub-off transfer sheets, which give you the same effect Lichty's grays have.

Always interesting to see how some of the originals look. Dabs of white out that don't fade to yellow with the paper, the one in the coffee house has obvious paste up heads.

This isn't a style that lends itself to animation easily, though. It's been influential, to be sure, but an exact translation to animation would be quite difficult. It's too loose and sketchy, a look that works fine for strips, but would look too sterilized if you attempted to clean it up for animation.

As a general rule, there's always a distinct difference between comic strip and animation art. Of all the attempts over the years to animate comic strips, as well as make comic strips from animated characters, very few if any manage to look the same as their source.

SparkyMK3 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
ComiCrazys said...

Paul - GREAT FIND!!! Thanks so much for the link. I LOVE that Lichty admits to using a gag writer. So many comic strip artists never own up to that, let alone using ghost artists as well. Kudos to Lichty!!!

JC - If I remember Rod Scrbner was a huge fan of Lichty and wanted to incorporate some of Lichty's style to his animation. Clampett gave the okay and you can see how masterfully Scribner used Lichty's style in Gruesome Twosome. Particularly the scene when the two cats are dressed in the horse costume and are running. Scribner liked the looseness of Lichty's line to hold the shape together.

Anyone feel free to correct me, but I think that's correct. John?

J C Roberts said...

That's why I said it was influential. I'm sure it inspired some animators, but since animation requires a more consistent line, you couldn't just carry his exact look into animation. The sparse, sketchy lines that convey a confident looseness in still panels would wind up looking blubbery and molten.

Frank Forte said...

wow! I forgot all about LICHTY--I used the read grin and Bear it as a kid. I can appreciate his art so much more now. The loose gestural drawings are amazing--he's one to study--now I'm on a LICHTY kick!! damn!!!

Ki Innis - (aka) Kimathi Roy John Innis said...

Very cool stuff!
Thanks for posting!