Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Falling Hare - 3-Headed Monster Rabbit!

Here's an animator just having fun!

Normal Speed:



Slow-motion:

74 comments:

Jesse Oliver said...

A great animation peice.

Ryan Kramer said...

Hahaha, that slow motion is great! I'll bet those animators had fun with those faces and blurs.

Good stuff John, thanks for continuing to keep us involved in old cartoons.

Mad Max Winston said...

This makes me feel that I should just start watching every Looney Tunes short in slow motion... man...

How is it even possible that cartoon animation has de - evolved so much after so much time? Seems like people should have just kept going in this direction... maybe... in the future?

The Butcher said...

Cool!

Anonymous said...

{hee}

The Butcher said...

Man, there's a lot goin on in that few seconds of head wobble! I wonder how frustrating it must be for an animator to do something that cool and know that most people who see it in motion won't ever realize what went into it.

bbum said...

John--

A note of thanks.  Because of this post and many like it, I shoved Chuck Jones: Extreme and In Betweens into my netflix queue.   Excellent stuff.

As a result, I promptly bought a 3 DVD, $45, set of classic WB cartoons from Amazon.

So -- thanks.

And, to Warner Brothers:  Screw you.   John K is generating real interest and real sales for you.  That you would treat him like shit nearly cost you a sale, but, instead, I'm opting to state "Without John K's weblog, I never would have bought said WB DVDs and I would not have the intention of buying the other 2 multi-DVD sets at $45/each.".

bbum said...

John--

A note of thanks.  Because of this post and many like it, I shoved Chuck Jones: Extreme and In Betweens into my netflix queue.   Excellent stuff.

As a result, I promptly bought a 3 DVD, $45, set of classic WB cartoons from Amazon.

So -- thanks.

And, to Warner Brothers:  Screw you.   John K is generating real interest and real sales for you.  That you would treat him like shit nearly cost you a sale, but, instead, I'm opting to state "Without John K's weblog, I never would have bought said WB DVDs and I would not have the intention of buying the other 2 multi-DVD sets at $45/each.".

I don't really care said...

That's incredibly fun, incredibly competent... just incredible.

--And Warner's, quit screwing up the remastering, and give us a complete chronological Clampett!

--In 1080p HD!

LOL Did Clampett act this scene out?

Taco Jack said...

Awesome animation - some of the frames remind me of creatures from Carpenter's version of The Thing.

John - what do you think of the Venture Brothers?

Danne8a said...

I have seen this sequence a dozen times in slow motion and it never ceases to amaze me.
Clampetts cartoons have definately worn out the freeze frame feature on my Dvd player!

Anonymous said...

This is amazing. I never would have expected all of those funny drawings in that one second. I can't believe it.



-Jordan
www.timwarnermovie.com

David Germain said...

Looking at the slow motion, it looks like the body movements were animated first and the multiplying heads was animated second. Not in that limited animation way of course. Moreso just doing things step by step one at a time so that it's perfect.

Clampett was definitely a genius among geniuses.

queefbizzle said...

John I have to ask you.

Jhonen Vasquez said when he made Invader Zim he spent more time going to meetings and arguing about ideas than working on the show.

Was it like that for you? And if so, why do you want to make another cartoon?

Shawn said...

I love it!

Who animated that scene?

Anonymous said...

heh, rod scribner animated it... who else?!

JohnK said...

I'm not sure, but I don't think it's Scribner...maybe. It doesn't look like him.

Chloe Cumming said...

Gorgeous revelatory stuff John, it's so... edifying!

edifying

ADJECTIVE: 1. Promoting culture: civilizing, cultural, enlightening, humanizing, refining. See CULTURE. 2. Serving to educate or inform: educational, educative, enlightening, illuminative, informative, instructional, instructive. See TEACH.

Interesting what the butcher said in one of the comments about wondering if animators were frustrated at not having their inventive individual drawings appreciated... to me it looks like you said, that the freedom to do drawings this fun in animation this beautiful is its own reward...

I wish there were more people, animators and beyond who interpreted 'fun' this way... if you love doing something, you're unlikely to be lazy about it, you're likely to to get joy out of doing it well.

David Germain said...

I'm not sure, but I don't think it's Scribner...maybe. It doesn't look like him.

I'll venture a guess and say Virgil Ross. But we do know for sure that IT AIN'T VENDAL VILKIE!!!

Craig D said...

What must the girls in ink & paint have thought? (Though, they were probably used to it by this point!)

Anonymous said...

I wonder if it's possible that all those Bugs heads (not so much the body) could've been the work of several different animators?

Brian Goss said...

I love all the different combinations the animator did the ears; especially when there's one big ear in the middle and two on either side.

This is my favorite Bugs Bunny cartoon, btw. I enjoy watching Bugs get beat at his own game...it actually makes his character more likable. For me anyway.

mark said...

This was one of the cartoons I just watched last night on WB-GC-Vol3 Disk 4, how coincidental! I noticed something really cool when i was slow motioning the Rabbit Punch cartoon: there is a scene in there where The Champ hits Bugs causing his head to spin around like a top... and it looks like of the 5 or so revolutions that Bug's head turns through the stills alternate so that on the first rev there is a cel of Bugs' head face-on and next rotation that cel in the series is replaced by Bugs' head at 3/4 Left. All the other frames showing the rotation are the same except the face-on and 3/4 left frames that alternate turns.
The overall effect is a cool oscillation in the headspin that makes it look Crazy and Dizzy...

CORKY said...

That was absolutely priceless, I'de like to see anything else try and top that!!! Thanks for posting, John!

-CORK

Franfou said...

wow the super slowmotion shows many faces and cool movments that we can barely see at normal speed. also it helps to understand how to make animation too.

The GagaMan(n) said...

Supreb, every frame is completely different. After watching the slow-motion version, I actually saw my favorites in the full-speed ersion, even if they were only there for a nano secound ;p

scot said...

I often wondered where the animators, in the pre-VCR world, came up with these images. There really wasn't a whole lot of imagery like this before Warner really began to take off. Did they stare at blurry photos? Did they look at individual frames of film? Great animation is just amazing

Brian P. Stone said...

Very revealing... it's great that you're able to post clips from the cartoons again. So why WOULD an animator put all those extra little poses and jokes into a scene like that (knowing that most people would never watch in slow motion, and thus miss out)? Was it really just to have some FUN with it? I wish MY job was fun...

Hammerson said...

>> I wonder if it's possible that all those Bugs heads (not so much the body) could've been the work of several different animators? <<

Could be. It looks that way to me too. Or it might be Scribner alone. I found these two animation or layout drawings from "Falling Hare" several years ago on a web site, and they were attributed to Scribner. The second image corresponds exactly to one of the frames from this scene. Take a look:
Falling Hare

P.C. Unfunny said...

Lovely animation,also, what is the "which way did he go george" gag ? In general, who made that sthick with the big moron calling someone George ?

I don't really care said...

John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men" is the source.

Thanks, Hammerson, for the drawings, but I'd bet money it's not Scribner... He tends to have a uniquely identifiable quality I can't articulate that I don't see in this...

I wouldn't bet a lot...

jess green said...

wasn't there that cartoon with the abominable snowman and Bugs where he did the George thing too? He wanted to call Bugs George and keep him as a pet "to love him and hold him and squish him"......

these animators were geniouses, that's a lot of in between heads, but the effect is brilliant in the cartoon!

Peggy said...

Given how much every animator I've known loves multiple images, smears, and other ways to solve the problem of motion happening far faster than 1/24 of a second, I'm continuously surprised at how static most still art by animators is.

Because, yknow, go look at stuff like Duchamp's "Nude Descending A Staircase". That's the same delight in a good multiple image that's on display in this clip.

Admittedly, I haven't produced much myself in the way of still art that does this, and I haven't gone all the way with some of the imagery I'd really like to do in this vein. But why is it that the only painting by an animator in the vein of "...Staircase" is that direct parody of it that Chuck did with a much-less-abstracted Daffy in place of the deconstructed nude? Where's someone taking the joy of smearing nineteen eyeballs, four noses, and about a hundred teeth across the screen, and putting it on canvas, instead of the somewhat-kinetic character art so many animators take a break with?

I don't really care said...
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I don't really care said...
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Meathaus said...

Great post, that has always been a favorite cartoon of mine. I never saw all those mutated Bugs before, thanks for that.

John a said...

The George and Lenny characters were from Steinbeck's Of "Mice and Men" of course, but the vocal performance of the big dumb Lenny character that you see so often in classic cartoons is based on Lon Chaney Jr.'s performance from the B&W film (released around 1938, not sure if it's available on video.)While Lon Chaney (most famous for playing the Wolfman for Universal) was never considered by anybody to be a great actor, it's obvious that there was something in his portrayal of Lenny that made animators of the time sit up and take notice.

I don't really care said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Meathaus said...

Also, anyone catch that three minute umbilical cord blood movie that google adsense is advertising on the top of the blog? Sounds like a good watch. I haven't seen it because I haven't had my breakfast yet. Maybe there was an umbilical cord blood post below that I missed or something.

I don't really care said...

wasn't there that cartoon with the abominable snowman and Bugs where he did the George thing too?

The gag made the rounds...MGM had a whole "George & Junior" series. They were pretty funny. Tex did them.

P.C. Unfunny said...

"John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men" is the source."


That was the first thing I thought. I was thinking the joke could have been from some radio show but I guess the LT whould imitate things from books as well.

P.C. Unfunny said...

"but the vocal performance of the big dumb Lenny character that you see so often in classic cartoons is based on Lon Chaney Jr.'s performance from the B&W film"

Oh I see.Thanks for the info.

juvenile_cyle said...

Wow, that's really cool. It's kind of a shame people just glaze right over that when they watch it. But at the same time, it's a treat for those who look for it. Great stuff.

John a said...

Happy to oblige. the movie is one of the all time great films. Burgess Merideth(known for his appearences on the Twilight Zone, TV's Batman, and The Rocky films)plays George.See it right away.

I don't really care said...

What's funny to me is how they unashamedly take Lenny's pathos and milk it for retarded laffs.

stiff said...

HELL YEAH!

Including that slow motion clip was a magnificent idea. I love being able to clearly see not only all of the heads, but also the initial smack and the timing of the foot movements that sell the drunken wobble so well. Also, even though the drawings of his head(s) look very disjointed, you can almost see a method to the number/shape of heads (except for the expressions, although some of those have reasonable transitions). It has elements of the "fast run" from Preston Blair's book, in that similar poses are spaced far apart, which makes sense as far as the delivery, because his head is supposed to be moving so fast. But it's a back-and-forth oscillation instead of a circular cycle. Like a guitar string. And, like a guitar string that's played with a slightly out-of-tune other string, which allows you to hear the two notes come in and out of phase with each other, Bugs' after images come in and out of phase with each other, creating the effect of one, two, or three heads, depending on where in the sequence he is. Notice also how the outside heads, whenever there are two or three, are mirror images (and damn good ones at that!). For the three-headed pictures, the two images of the same head are so far out of phase that the next (or previous, I dunno) head shows up in phase in the middle.

One more thing: the up-and-down wave generated by the smack with the wrench is continued at decreasing magnitude up to about halfway into the wobbly heads -- that's why some of the heads are so bloated. You'll notice that his cranium being bloated is soon followed by a bloated jaw. And this effect decreases over time, just as a real wave would!

Bottom line: whoever animated this wasn't "just" having fun -- a whoooole lot of thought and planning went into it.

john a said...

The "Zip" out of the scene in the previous shot is fun to look at frame by frame, too.

Kitty said...

LOL! the things that you find when you freeze-frame them.

Ryan G. said...

John, good idea to show slo mo version.. Are all these classic cartoons 24 frames per second or do they draw 12 frames and shoot on twos?

cemenTIMental said...

I often wondered where the animators, in the pre-VCR world, came up with these images. There really wasn't a whole lot of imagery like this before Warner really began to take off. Did they stare at blurry photos? Did they look at individual frames of film? Great animation is just amazing
Well, if you were in the film/animation industry back in the day (+ thus had access to film equipment) it'd be EASIER to freeeze-frame things than on a pre-digital VCR. Just put a film in your Steenbeck editing table or whatever, and spool thru at whatever speed you like, stop perfectly on whatever frame you want... as opposed to those horrible fuzzy old-school VHS pauses we are now mercifully free of :)

kp said...

It's so cool to see just how many drawings go into a short bit like that. One frame I like had a 2-headed Bugs, both facing each other with an expression that seemed for that split second to say,"There's only room for one of us, pal, and it's gonna be me!"

I need to go back on some of these other Looney Tunes in slow-mo and see what other funny drawings I might be missing!

cemenTIMental said...

Astonishing clip by the way John! I always love to see really extreme frames like this... where you can't believe it works, and can't imagine where they began figuring out to draw such ludicrous and amazing shapes! ^_^ (well, you can imagine that I'm sure! But I can't.)

max ward said...

I love that. Another clip from Falling Hare you should post in slow motion is the scene where Bugs slips on the banana peels in the airplane.

bf said...

technical question: (also asked by ryan g.) back in the day, were these cartoons animated on a 12 fps timebase and then step printed for the release print, or were they all made at 24 fps from the get-go? I guess another way to ask the question is: did the timing sheets show 24 frames every second or some other rate?

JohnK said...

>>I guess another way to ask the question is: did the timing sheets show 24 frames every second or some other rate?<<

24 frames per second

cemenTIMental said...

were these cartoons animated on a 12 fps timebase and then step printed for the release print,No, rather step-photographed.: ie 2 frames shot on the rostrum per drawn cel... with whatever variation here + there maybe?

Jorge Garrido said...

>LOL Did Clampett act this scene out?

He must have really suuffered for his art if he did. Clampett actually died of severe head trauma a few days after Falling Hare was completed. True Story.
...
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...
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Yeah.

Bob said...

The great thing about that is the whole time his head(s) are doing that, it still flows great and carries your eyes along. Even with all that looniness they still animated it perfectly.

Art F. said...

Simply awesome! I love how the middle head has no ears and when the two heads look at each other. It's also great how the two heads sometimes share one mouth. Awesome!

Rocky Mtn Yeti said...

Hey John, First visit to the blog and already know I'll be visiting more often.

I had no idea how many separate drawings went into that 3 second head smash! Thanks for the lesson!

cableclair said...

<3 !! Absolutely awesome to see it in slow-motion. I can watch stuff like this for days on an end.

Anonymous said...

Man this inspires ne so much !!! great stuff John

Roberto González said...

Wow! The slow motion is really amazing. I had never figured out there were so many drawings in it. I love every two-head pose, the heads seem to look to each other in each one of them XD!

fabiopower said...

John, a question with respect to the performance of the cartoons: To where can to make the performance of the animator, or, where begins the performance of the director? I know that each director is different, but… what is more recommendable ??

Donald S. said...

I love it when they do that crazy stuff. I can watch that kind of thing all day.

Eric C. said...

Wow, It's amazing how that animates.
Any way did anyone noticed the paint blooper on Bug's foot when he says "Thanks allot George, thanks allot."
John, have you ever read the book "Mice and Men"
If not, that's were that Thanks allot George lines and some inspiration of Tex Avery's cartoons came from.

Dave_the_Turnip said...

man that was great. Since i started reading this blog, i had always wished youtube had a way for going step by step. Technically you found a way too. :)

It amazes me just how wacky and out of proportion some of those drawings are yet how it all works seemlessly at full speed. I think that's one of the things i love most about animation.

Brett W. Thompson said...

Eeee! Great post, John: the frame by frame was so fascinating!! :) Just made my jaw drop and made me smile at the same time, hahaha :)

I've heard from multiple sources that watching beautiful animation frame by frame is a good way to learn :)

I'm still looking for a program that'll let me go frame-by-frame forward *and* backward... I mean, I can load video into an editor and do it that way but that's kind of a pain.

Also, I notice that people like to ask about Venture Brothers and Invader Zim. While I personally find these cartoon amusing (but lacking in the beauty of the old cartoons), I think John is more interested in talking about the more lively, classic animation. Just a thought :)

Tara said...

John! Get your ass to New York, bitch! ;)

Your deranged admirer, Tarasina

Ollie said...

Wow! Alot of work went into that one!

Great post John.

-ollie

lastangelman said...

After seeing that, I spent a half hour trying to get my jaw off the floor. That was effing amazing. Scribner must have knew that fellow in Switzerland who invented LSD or perhaps he and Melendez drove down to Mexico for peyote caps! How did Clampett know how to put a scene together like that? You can only act out a scene for your animators so much, unless he stood around making silly putty faces at his animators all day! You see this Warners stuff and you want to go down to Scooby Doo archives and just burn every episode into ashes. How dare Hanna-Barbara call their stuff cartoons?

Book said...

Great poses. Indeed the animator having fun. Need more of that in today's world!

Anonymous said...

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David Germain said...

I'm not sure, but I don't think it's Scribner...maybe. It doesn't look like him.

I had another thought about this scene: Maybe Virgil Ross animated the body and Rod Scribner animated the head. Or maybe Bob Clampett himself animated the head, or at least scribbled down some poses and timed them out.

I think that could be a possibility.