Friday, February 22, 2008

Huck Magic Bumper Animation






There are lots of these on here!

13 comments:

James N. said...

Pretty well done for what it is. The animation is still pretty limited but it moves enough to keep it alive.

Bitter Animator said...

Really nice work. This would be no more entertaining with more frames so, personally, I think it's beyond "pretty well done for what it is"

Are chickens the funniest birds? I think so.

Booo Tooons Ltd. said...

I love how the Corn Flakes cock has different colored outlines.

Such an appealing design, and it makes you want to look at it. That's good marketing.

- trevor.

Kris said...

That is a very cute sequence. I love that gag where Yogi's feet come out from under the table and he dances off the screen, table and all.

You hardly even notice it's limited animation--it does seem a lot fuller than the HB cartoons themselves, too.

Johnny Mastronardi said...

I just realized how much I like the inking style of the HB TV stuff. It's a stronger inking style compared to the thinner lines of the 40s theatrical shorts, but it's still very organic. Why can't anyone draw like this anymore?

Bruce said...

I've already placed my order, can't wait. Are their any other DVD's you would recommend, Johnny Dangerously?

JohnK said...

Hi Bruce, I put a bunch of the videos I like in the Amazon section on the right of the blog. I'll put some more up soon.

Bitter: Chickens are definitely great cartoon characters.

Kris: I have some HB commercials that are much fuller than that, but they are copied on the dvds badly, double images and interlacing. They don't look too good.

I may put one up anyway. The ones animated by Ed Love look great!

Lindenbaum311 said...

Hey John, I've got a question regarding the difference between H.B. cartoons in the 40's and H.B. cartoons in the 60's. I noticed that Tom & Jerry had a lot of detail put into their animation and the backgrounds were incredibly realistic. Yet in the 60's, H.B. produced a myriad of cartoons like Yogi Bear, Top Cat, etc. And most of the cartoons had the repeating backgrounds. They were still great cartoons. But my question is: What was the reason for the transition between a high budget cartoon like T & J in the 40's and a bunch of lower budget cartoons in the 60's? What exactly was the difference between the 40's H.B. cartoons and the 60's H.B. cartoons?

Mr. Trombley said...

Dear Sir, I have been thinking about output recently.

I got into a debate with a friend over what is the optimum level of production for a person is. We were comparing Wittgenstein (low) and Peirce (high) at the time. Now I am trying to get a wider perspective.

What is, given your experience and historical knowledge, the ideal standard of output for a cartoonist or studio of cartoonists? Feel free to use whatever measurement that is intelligible.

patchwork said...

wow, that was freakin' great! I got all excited to see the Pixie & Dixie cartoon coming up

rodineisilveira said...

Johnny K.,

Did Carlo Vinci animate this bumper from The Huckleberry Hound Show (Hanna-Barbera/Columbia Pictures, 1958-62)? His "zig-zag" animation style and the facial ticks seem familiar to me.

Gabriel said...

wow, i had never heard huck's original voice. His thick southern accent makes it pretty hard to understand his words, at least to my untrained foreign ears...

James Sutton said...

Just nice..
Limited animation done right.
Presta-dijja-dijja-tater.