Sunday, November 22, 2009

More Walt Wisdom






22 comments:

JKG said...

Word up!

Bob Lilly said...

John,
Thanks for the post. I try to read every Walt Disney biography. It is amazing that Walt was wiped out several times and didn't give up. He really wasn't about the money, but what he wanted to achieve. He went from cartoons to theme parks to utopian city visionary.
His management style comes under criticism under today's standards. He ran things pretty much like most did back then..like a sweatshop. Walt is on my list of people I wish I had met.

talkingtj said...

i grew up thinking this guy was the be-all, end-all, i wanted to be as magical as i thought he was, but the more i read about him and the more i see what he says about himself, the more disillusioned iam with him. 'innocence in action' what the hell does that even mean?! 'if someone tries to get too high brow out he goes' well that explains americas current fascination with being stupid-uncle walt said its ok.i cant even read the rest of it! he just pisses me off!

RooniMan said...

The man has spoken.

Stephen Worth said...

At the CTN-X expo yesterday, Disney had recruiters looking over portfolios. One of them said, "At Disney we don't exaggerate facial features for humor." Even Walt wasn't THAT conservative!

John Young said...

"It was the most natural thing in the world for me to imagine that mice and squirrels might have feelings just like mine."

Good old Walt predates Peter Singer's "Animal Liberation" by a good 20 years.

Shawn Dickinson said...

Walt forgot to mention the magic of butt jokes.

Zoran Taylor said...

"If someone tries to get too highbrow, out he goes"

Does "too highbrow" mean genuinely intelligent in a funny way? Boy, Disney sure hated that. He didn't seem to mind fake, pretentious "intellectual" design and unfunny stories, though.

What a nutbar.

David said...

Disney had recruiters looking over portfolios. One of them said, "At Disney we don't exaggerate facial features for humor."

Can you imagine ?! Wow. People like Ward Kimball would not be able to get a job at today's Disney. (actually I don't think Walt Disney could get and hold a job at today's Disney. Crazy old guy, throwing away all that money on those projects like Fantasia. What will the stockholder's say ? )

sharpyoungbull said...

in the shadow area: "It's the story that appeals to me..."

K. Nacht said...

Missouri boy* wasn't offended by the high-brow enuff to forgo polo matches with the elite. But I guess wealth doesn't always afford sophistication. Here's to obscure creative impressions and death to narrow populists.

* Kansans called 'em "pukes" during the bloody days of abolition.

aalong64 said...

This post shows a lot of the reasons I dislike Disney. The fact that he says all this stuff like it's a good thing is probably the main thing that bugs me.

I don't know what he's even trying to say with that bit about mice and squirrels' feelings. If he's trying to take credit for anthropomorphic animal characters with personalities, that's just absurd. Felix the cat, for one, predated Oswald, Mickey, etc by a few years.
And if he's trying to say that he's got some incredible, enlightened, unique, childlike view of the world... congratulations. So did everybody else in animation at the time.

Spence M. said...

Walt did what he loved in the way he saw fit, on his nickle, in a vocation that recieved little respect in the entertainment industry.
His values and methods of labor management were in step with his times. That we see differently today speaks of recent incremental changes in the consciousness of our citizens.
It is easy to criticize the life and work of men whose time is past. My childhood was impacted greatly by the pleasure of the cartoons and movies created by Walt and his peers.
So what if Walt printed boiler plate to enable him to finance his work? It was toug financing films then. There were many risks and the money people saw respectability as bankable. Jesus, folks, it was the times, and risk takers like Walt scrambled for every dollar to bring their visions to the public.
II can't imagine what life woould be like if he had not perservered.

EalaDubh said...

"With all living things I have a terrific sympathy."

Except communists.

Nicolás Rivera said...

Where is that page from? I'd really like to read the whole thing. Any book I could find online?

Stephen Worth said...

Two more quotes from the recruiters at CTN-X today...

"Don't draw studies of toys. You can't animate them."

(While looking at a pencil test) "I can't tell if this film is well animated. It's just lines. It isn't finished. Is this an animatic? Maybe it is actually animated. It probably just needs more inbetweens."

Greg (not my name is earl) G said...

Before more people go crazy, take everything anyone anywhere says with a grain of salt. To whom was he speaking? What is the context?

If he's talking to moms & kids, I can dig dumbing down to get the butts in the seats. Anything for a buck. No one ever got rich by being nice or generous. Unless it was a con job, and every politician and business man is a con-artist.

And remember kids: Communism is always bad.

K. Nacht said...

It's been written that before Dumbo, and thus the most valuable period of the Disney studios output, Walt pursued the formal development of animation, the quality, at a monetary loss. It's said he also paid out benefits to employee's out of step with his time, quoted as saying, ca. 1936, "This place runs on a kind of Jesus Christ communism!" This way of working culminated in Pinnochio! Communists like Eisenstein and Charlie Chaplin adored Disney during this period. The labor disputes of the forties cost Disney some of his best men, who fell on the side of their own self interest. (Isn't that the cornerstone of Randian philosophy?) We can chart a decline in animation starting there. Without this interest in the ART rather than the PROFIT, animation as an artform would not have developed it's Golden Age. Nor would the competing studios of Warner and MGM been compelled to produce the quality they are known for, (whence the incentive?) and both those studios had their animation departments developed by former Disney men, Hugh Harman and Rudy Ising.

RAKninja said...

I sure do wish i could come up with a response such as that as to what my friends think of me.

Also, nice bit of contrast with the "highbrow" quote, and then the description of what makes his pictures so great.

Ray said...

Anyone else remember the days when Mickey actually had teeth in his cartoons and was somewhat of a trickster?

Bryce Johansen said...

I didn't know that was surpose to be wisdom?

Sounds like he's just yapping his chops off to me.

Payo said...

"At Disney we don't exaggerate facial features for humor." Only to perpetuate stereotypes.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/40184298@N04/3696205142/sizes/l/in/set-72157620921780167/

Wasn't this guy the voodoo priest in "Live and Let Die" already?